Falling Down
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Customer Reviews:

  • FALLING DOWN - Michael Douglas at his very best.
    This film has had more controversy surround it than most, but let me tell you, it's one kick-ass piece of work. Like Richard Burton's reverend in NIGHT OF THE IGUANA, who goes over the edge during a Sunday sermon, Douglas, as the victim of downsizing, makes that same trip while stuck in a traffic jam on an L. A. freeway during a summer heat spell. (I live in the Los Angeles area, and though I have never lost my job to downsizing, I still have total empathy for the character's breaking point every time I get stuck in similar traffic snarls!) Once he gets out of his car, leaving it abandoned in the middle of the traffic jam, and starts his march through the city to go home to his ex-wife and child, we know nothing positive is going to come. The trip is alternatively funny and tragic, thanks to Douglas's performance. He somehow manages to walk the very thin line between his character's Archie Bunker-isms and his character's horrible situation as he cuts a violent path to the ocean. There are some truly hard-to-watch moments in this film (the war surplus store sequence is particularly brutal), but one can't shy away from the out-of-control anger of this poor man, who can't understand why he's suffered his fate of unemployment after playing by all of the rules. Economic forces continue to leave many in similar circumstances, but Douglas starts connecting the dots to things that have nothing to do with his plight: a Korean mini-mart owner who marks up everything, including a can of soda; fast-food service providers who play by their policies with arrogance, etc. The tragic humor in the Douglas character is that he sees himself as the victim of all these forces and of the inner-city dry rot that he encounters on his journey. (Thankfully, most people shelve their victimhood and move on with their lives, often landing squarely and positively on both feet.) This film is great because it provokes reactions in the viewer, often creating a sense of discomfort. Not easily forgotten, FALLING DOWN should be enjoyed as the masterpiece it ultimately is.


    ...more info
  • Madness takes its toll - please have exact change
    Everyday life can cause enough stress to break the average person. Overworked and underpaid, many people are ticking time bombs, waiting for the right reason to explode. Well, Bill Foster (Douglas) and his wife are having problems, he lost his job, he can't pay child support or see his daughter because his wife's restraining order, and it's just damn hot outside. While stuck in a traffic jam - and who doesn't get angry in traffic - Bill's air conditioner breaks down. Tick, tick, tick...

    Bill decides the best way to deal with everything is to ditch his car and get a soda at a nearby convenience store. When a Korean store owner overcharges for the soda, Bill argues with him. Tick, tick...The store owner takes out a bat and threatens Bill. Tick. Bill wrestles the bat away (BOOM!), rearranges the store, and pays what he feels is a fair amount for the Coke. What ensues is a confrontation between Bill and the rest of LA, as Hispanic gang-members attempt to extort money for a fictitious toll through their land. Bill chases them away with the bat, and taunts them as they leave, yelling that they should "learn to write the f'ing graffiti in English". The gang later tracks him down and attempts to shoot him in a drive-by. Oops, they hit everyone in sight except for their target, and in their haste they crashed. Naturally, Bill picks up their bag of weapons, taunts one of the guys, and shoots him in the leg as a message.

    Several other incidents of mayhem take place as Bill creates havoc throughout the city. A scene at a restaurant that has moved from the breakfast to lunch menu by just two minutes, and refuses to serve breakfast, is particularly poignant. It seems that nobody is willing to be hospitable, further fueling Bill's feelings of mistreatment at the hands of society, not to mention the general apathy among the general public.

    This film really hits home, and rings true in many places I've been. Rampant corruption and government waste, worthless leeches sucking an already masticated system dry, and dregs of society ruining everything for those of us who try to do right. Sadly, it's seems that we are either headed for the future as shown in Idiocracy, or more Bill Fosters running around...neither is appealing....more info
  • Hey, I'm sorry too, Rick
    This movie is about a Reagan Democrat who votes Ross Perot only to end up with Bill Clinton. Naturally, he snaps. You know the rest of the story...

    "Falling Down" is a near-conservative, half-sexist and very violent movie about an angry White man, named D-Fence, who gets sick and tired of the car lines in LA, and decides to walk through the city instead. Along the way, he confronts stingy Koreans, Hispanic gangsters, a neo-Nazi shop owner and some rich White golfers. The encounters get progressively more violent, as D-Fence gets hold of more and more lethal weapons. Finally, the police is called in and tracks him down. The two police officers are arguably the most boring characters in the entire movie, real nerds!

    I'm not sure whether the movie has a real message, or whether it's simply a commercial speculation, but I suppose it's about the alienation of middle-class White males from contemporary America. Or something.

    I readily admit that I like this movie, despite the questionable political message. And no, I don't take it very seriously. It's sheer entertainment. Half of the lines and all of the absurd situations are classics. "Hey, I'm sorry too, Rick". "There goes a man with a smile on his face. I'm sure his ECONOMICALLY VIABLE". "Have you seen his wife? SMACK". My favorite character is the Black guy who protests outside a bank, which considered him economically unviable. And my favorite situation is when D-Fence takes care of the crazy Nazi guy. But hey, Rick, I'm a liberal!

    :-D

    Recommended, if you take it with a very large grain of salt...

    Breakfast, anyone?
    ...more info
  • Could have been better - the first half is great, and then...
    Have you ever had ENOUGH ALREADY of Fast Food
    places pulling the switch of breakfast to lunch
    on you? Are you tired of punk spraypainters ruining
    your neighborhood, if you live in/near a big city?
    Tired of being overcharged by store owners that
    barely speak 'the queen's Amer-I-can'? Then the
    first half of this well filmed and very well acted
    movie is for you. Based on a WASPy novel about a
    laid-off DEFENS worker who "get's back some of his
    own" on the society and the 'Political Stupidity'
    around him, Michael Douglas does a good job here.

    However I was a bit leary of this movie when I saw
    the name of Israeli arms dealer extrordinarie, Arnon
    Milchen [pronounced ar-NON MILL-chin], in the credits.
    This film could have been a "Populist" favorite for yrs.,
    to come - until the film unravels to the point of when
    Douglas character quizically says to one of Virginia's
    finest-ever Actors, Robert Duval('s character), near the
    end, 'I'm the bad guy?', and procedes to get blown away
    by pulling a water gun on the retiring-cop-on-his-last-
    day! By then you must think to yourself, "What's the use
    [or point!]..."...more info
  • Hey, I'm sorry too, Rick
    This movie is about a Reagan Democrat who votes Ross Perot only to end up with Bill Clinton. Naturally, he snaps. You know the rest of the story...

    "Falling Down" is a near-conservative, half-sexist and very violent movie about an angry White man, named D-Fence, who gets sick and tired of the car lines in LA, and decides to walk through the city instead. Along the way, he confronts stingy Koreans, Hispanic gangsters, a neo-Nazi shop owner and some rich White golfers. The encounters get progressively more violent, as D-Fence gets hold of more and more lethal weapons. Finally, the police is called in and tracks him down. The two police officers are arguably the most boring characters in the entire movie, real nerds!

    I'm not sure whether the movie has a real message, or whether it's simply a commercial speculation, but I suppose it's about the alienation of middle-class White males from contemporary America. Or something.

    I readily admit that I like this movie, despite the questionable political message. And no, I don't take it very seriously. It's sheer entertainment. Half of the lines and all of the absurd situations are classics. "Hey, I'm sorry too, Rick". "There goes a man with a smile on his face. I'm sure his ECONOMICALLY VIABLE". "Have you seen his wife? SMACK". My favorite character is the Black guy who protests outside a bank, which considered him economically unviable. And my favorite situation is when D-Fence takes care of the crazy Nazi guy. But hey, Rick, I'm a liberal!

    :-D

    Recommended, if you take it with a very large grain of salt...

    Breakfast, anyone?
    ...more info
  • Sentimentality Runs Amuck
    I have a daughter, too - like the protagonist in this film.

    She's studying English composition in high school, and I was helping her study. There was a list of composition terms, like "exposition" and "suspense" and "resolution."

    One was "Sentimentality." It made me think of this movie. The writers were trying to place the audience in sympathy with Bill Foster, and did so by creating circumstances around him that middle class white people have heard about or experienced.

    The warped edge of sentimentality is that, once you're hooked by it, you can be manipulated by it. So, interest in dramatic quality gets sidetracked by our own visceral need for resolution. We can set aside our moral objections and hope that Bill just kills somebody.

    Of course, that's exactly how the makers of the movie reel us in. Gradually we are manipulated into shifting our identification from Bill to Robert Duvall.

    What makes this a weak movie, though, is that good movies don't manipulate audiences with sentimentality. Audience identification is welcome and maybe even essential, but who likes to feel outsmarted or manipulated?

    When it was first relased, the film succeeded commercially by capitalizing on the sensationalism of its main theme. Now, so many years later, we see how the end result leaves you cold....more info
  • What a movie!
    I absolutely loved this movie! It was awesome and very powerful! The movie was also hilarious! Michael Douglas gives a great performance as William, a layed off engineer who has a meltdown and a very hectic day. Will is stuck in awful traffic because of pointless road construction and just leaves his car. He wants to see his daughter on her birthday but his mean ex wife won't let him and threathens him. She was a character that I dissliked and I felt great pity for Will. Will has a crazy day where he revolts against society. This movie is very powerful as it shows some of society's problems. Will teaches a Korean guy that the prices in his store are all wrong, beats up some mean gang members trying to steal his briefcase, holds up a McDonald'sish store because he wants a breakfast meal and not lunch, destroys a payphone and much more. The classic golf sequence and the construction site scene are awesome and hilarious and worth it alone. Robert Duvall gives a good performance also as a cop. The movie is hilarious but also sad and makes an important point. It shows how society is srewed up in so many ways.
    Here's my advice. Don't rent this movie. Buy it. It's worth it and is a remarquable film worht rewatching over and over again. I loved it and it's even in my top 25 movies of all time! Please check them out on my about me page and listamia list under my top25 movies! It's changing sometimes but I really recommend these movies to EVERYONE! So, if you want to see some excellent movies that I really enjoyed, check them out! I think that you'll really enjoy them!...more info
  • Revenge of the Nerd
    In a brilliant parody of the anti-hero, Michael Douglas portrays the faceless, pseudo-white collar employee - William "Bill" Foster/D-Fens - who finally reaches his limit in he boiling summer heat of a gridlocked Los Angeles freeway.

    With his adventures in revenge taking him the urban streets to suburbia, Douglas aptly juxtaposes the insanity of the soul and the bizarre fabric of society, no matter the setting. Robert Duvall perfectly plays Detective Martin Prendergast, who is ultimately on a collision course with trying to bring Foster's wave of terror to an end.

    It is a solid punch into the midsection of the morals, racism and sickening traps in the human rat race. Foster cries out for many when he exclaims, "I'm the bad guy? How did that happen?" ...more info
  • Time to stand up!
    Great movie. Could have done without the love interest side of the story, but it's so good, it is still a solid 5 star movie. See it!!!...more info
  • Zorba the White Guy
    I somehow managed to miss this movie when it was new and saw it for the first time a few days ago (circa mid 2005) and have been haunted by it ever since. Michael Douglas gives a masterful performance, the best I've ever seen him give, as a thoroughly forgettable middle class White Guy facing the same urban pressures many of us (at least here in the good old USA) face daily, and snapping. After being caught in an L.A. traffic jam with a disfunctional air conditioner he does the thing many of us have thought of doing but somehow never managed to quite do: He gets out out his car (license plate D-FENS) and walks away. From there, Douglas' character goes on an orgy of 'doing the things we all have been tempted to do, but somehow don't'. From trashing a rude, venal convenience store owner's enterprise to offing a homophobic Nazi sympathizer (who makes the mistake of assuming Douglas' character is 'one of us'). Douglas is on a mission and at the point of dispatching (by any means necessary) any and all impediments to that mission. The mission: to give his little girl a birthday present, ultimately to "go home" and reestablish his life (somehow) to "what it used to be" before his ex-wife (understandably) kicked him out. I won't synopsize the movie any further (except to say that Robert Duvall gives his typical amazing performance, the kind that justifies the art and profession of acting in spite of everybody else out there who call themselves actors), others here have done a fine job at that, so I won't try to repeat them. I'll just add a reaction that I had that I didn't see in other's reviews. Somewhere in the middle of the movie I realized that I recognized Douglas' character, that I'd seen this guy somewhere else and couldn't for the life of me quite figure out where. Now, this character is a pretty unlikely one, a guy whose entire being is focused down to exactly one tiny little, gleaming, diamond hard task that he will let NOTHING interfere with, or even slow down. A guy whose goals we tend to sympathize with, but whose methods we can't (quite) bring ourselves to tollerate. As Daniel Jolley put it in her review above, "in a clearly psychotic way, I find this movie somewhat touching," a sentiment apparently shared by almost all the other 'amature reviewers' on Amazon's site (who for the most part did a magnificent job reviewing this movie, by the way). Touche, Ms. Jolley! Back to my own point: After brooding over it for a long time I finally realized where I'd seen this character before; as the hero of almost all of Nikos Kazanzatkas' novels. In particlar, Douglas' character IS St. Francis of Assisi as portrayed in Kazanzatkas' novel of the same name (published as 'God's Pauper: Saint Francis of Assisi' in England), or, to a somewhat lesser extent, Jesus in 'The Last Temptation of Christ', or Zorba in Kazanzatkas' best known novel. For anyone who has ever read a Kazanzatkas novel, this should strike a chord. Kazanzatkas' heros are NEVER 'good guys', their goals are far too big for such trivial classifications to be appropriate, at least in the view of the hero in question, as they are for Douglass' character. They are habitually, and constantly, at odds with society around them, are on missions that (by their lights) are far more important than the few little people who may, regretably, become incidental casualties of their quest. They are, in a word, psychotic. I, for one, have found Kazanzatkas' work so magnificently powerful in part because of the way he manages to explore this tension between personal lunacy (his St. Francis would spend his entire life in a straight jacket today) and the quest for higher truths/goals. Perhaps, if it could have happened, 'Falling Down' would have recieved a far less ambivalent reception oh, say 200 years ago, when people were more used to thinking of the 'big picture', more willing, at least hypothetically, to sacrifice the individual in persuit of the larger truth. I'm not sure what that reception would have been, but I don't think it would have been ambivalent. I also believe that the Amazon reviewers of the early 1800's wouldn't mistake this as a movie about 'White Rage', or 'Urban Violence' any more than the story of St. Francis is a story about 'animal rights', or 'The Last Temptation of Christ' is a call for marriage in the priesthood. Kazanzatkas (and St. Francis, and Jesus, and Douglas' character) had bigger fish to fry. I won't presume to propose an opinion on the nature of those fish, since that would undermine the entire point of this movie I think, to get YOU to think about the nature of the big fish. It's had that effect on me at any rate, as a Kazanzatkas novel does.
    If you've ever read a Kazanzatkas novel (all the way through I mean) then you should own a copy of this movie. You will look at it periodically, and brood, and think of St. Francis, and big fish, and other psychotics. ...more info
  • 3 stars out of 4
    The Bottom Line:

    Falling Down is an intelligent and often blackly comic drama with an impressive performance by Douglas in the lead; it's probably not as high-regarded today as it should be, and it's worth seeking out....more info
  • Time to stand up!
    Great movie. Could have done without the love interest side of the story, but it's so good, it is still a solid 5 star movie. See it!!!...more info
  • "I'm the bad guy?"
    Joel Schumacher could've had a killer movie: a feature-length newspaper headline reading "Angry White Male Cuts Swath of Destruction Across L.A." It couldah been a contendah. And besides, how can you go wrong with Douglas and Duvall?

    But it does go wrong. First, we get recycled ethnic characters from every possible ethnic group (AWMs included in Douglas himself, wearing 60s knock-off classes, a white shirt and a pocket protector for heaven's sake). Even then, the movie could have been great in a schlocky kind of way, a fantasy revenge flick for AWMs. But then Schumacher totally blows the other parts of the story, particularly Duvall's Detective Prendergast as a recycled detective-on-the-verge-of-retirement, a cliche so common that it's been repeatedly lampooned in movies like "Short Time" and cartoons like "The Simpsons": "No! NO! MENDDDOOOOZAAA!"

    In short: great principle story and actors ruined by tired supporting characters and secondary plot.
    ...more info
  • Unique and Memorable!
    Yeah, yeah... I know, the film is loaded with stereotypes and hokey moments. Especially that scene where Duval sings to his nutty wife over the phone... Ick.

    Yet, lets get beyond that stuff. Is this film all superficial? No substance? HARDLY!!

    Number one... it is "unique." Oh sure, the retiring cop afraid of being killed on his last day is cliche, but it's not the main thrust of the movie.

    Number two... stereotypes DO have a basis in reality. It isn't over reaching to imagine the gang members, the convinience store owner unwilling to break a dollar, the fast food joint insisting on "lunch menu" only one minute after the change over, the neo Nazi militant, the snobbish country club coots, etc, etc.

    Number three... Douglas has flipped his wig. He's really not responsible for his actions, as he does everything most of us have secretly fantasized about. It's not really a "celebration" of violence, but it seems absurdly FUNNY as he acts out his retributions. He is obsessed with his ex-wife and daughter... he can't accept their loss. His mind is falling down...

    Number four... The main thrust of the movie is a societal commentary. Everyone is after the "crazy man" with a white shirt and gym bag... but when put in perspective, the wandering psycho isn't as "sick" as what is ACCEPTED in modern day LA. Gangs, drive-by shootings, rude store and food service workers, closet nazis, people who are "not economically viable," loud mouthed jerks in traffic jams, country club snobs who can't even tolerate a person "passing through," and on and on.

    This point is drummed home perfectly when Douglas says to his wife "I'm sick? Take a walk through this town... THAT'S SICK." Every weapon Douglas carries is "taken" off somebody else... he just absorbs the sickness that's around him.

    SPOILER ALERT>>> in the end, Douglas realizes he's ruined whatever chance he had for a normal life. He willing sarifices himself, so his estranged daughter could benefit. Douglas meets his end, and we weep for the "bad guy."

    Meanwhile, our sick society goes on being sick...

    This is a truly memorable movie, with a few cliche' moments.

    Jeff Messenger, author of the novel "The Shroud of Torrington."...more info
  • 3 stars out of 4
    The Bottom Line:

    Falling Down is an intelligent and often blackly comic drama with an impressive performance by Douglas in the lead; it's probably not as high-regarded today as it should be, and it's worth seeking out....more info
  • D-Fens
    Falling Down

    Drama

    1993

    Director: Joel Schumacher

    Review by: Flint McColgan

    Expertly directed by Joel Schumacher, Falling Down is the fantastic story of a man who has come to the end of his patience for the filthy, dissappointing world around him, and he sets out to fix it.

    Michael Douglas gives a startingly great performance as Bill Foster, "an ordinary man" who designs missiles to defend America from "the communists." Foster leads a rather miserable life; his ex-wife, Elizabeth, has a restraining order against him, his daughter is growing up without him experiencing it, he lives with his mother, he has a car with no air conditioning on the hottest day of the year, and he's pissed.

    The construction sign keeps saying "DELAY," "DELAY," "DELAY," the kids in the school bus next to him are loud, an ugly woman is applying way too much lipstick, a fly is driving him out of his mind, a tacky "Garfield" stuffed-animal is stuck to the window of a car with children, people are shouting into a cell phone in a convertible, and it's hot, too hot. Foster just wants to go home. It's his daughter, Adele's, birthday.

    Detective Prendergast, played by Robert Duvall, is just trying to finish up his last day on the job before moving to some town with a lake in Arizona with his mentally-ill, manipulative wife when he picks up some on connections in a string of chaotic events. He has never really been taken seriously as a cop because he is too gentle and just not one of the guys. Now he struggles to resolve the madness despite gradually becoming a civilian again.

    Bill has worked hard for his country, got a Purple Heart in Vietnam, works for the defense of the nation and all around him is filth. America is the land of the free, the home of the brave... None of these worthless pieces of garbage around him are worthy of it, even of life.

    The acting is truly amazing... Douglas almost lead me to tears in his confused reaction to his life and world crumbling, (or,rather, "falling") down around him. Duvall is bearly recognizable as the as the actor Duvall, but, instead, totally embodies his character to someone you can almost come to know as a friend. Barbara Hershey, as Elizabeth, balances both her undeniable fear of and love of Bill, who she really just wants to get better and finally be happy.

    Supporting characters and minor-role characters really shine with their characters and provide enough depth to where you actually end up hating, loving, or feeling sorry for them. Foster's mother, Lois Smith, gives a very depressing image of a mother who has forgotten how to live and tries to replace this by befriending glass statues. Frederic Forrest disgusts the audience with his interpretation of a crazy, Nazi-sympathizing Surplus Store owner who tries to ally himself with Foster.

    Falling Down presents a world, Las Angeles and surrounding areas, filled with struggling immigrant shop keepers, brutish street gangs, dirty scammers and a homeless population to compete with the homeowners. This rather chaotic, yet familiar, populace is not helping the already dreary lives of the main characters who all present their own webs of sad, lonely histories in this very memorable, compassionate, and highly enertaining film.

    4 / 5

    Notes:

    Bill Foster is commonly referred to as "D-Fens," because that was what was written on his license plate. This is wrong, because usually characters are credited as things other than their names because we do not know their real names. An example is "Bandaged Street Thug" being a credit for a character that was, well, a gang-member that happens to be prominently bandaged in some way. Another example would be crediting a spokesperson for a company as "[Company Name] Spokesperson"). An argument to this would be that Bill had changed into "D-Fens" when he went on his rampage. I don't believe this, however, because, from the backstory we learn in the film, he has always been an tempermental, dysfunctional man....more info
  • Geek pusshed too far
    sad movie about an abusive father that decides he should abuse the whole world for his failings..
    ...more info
  • Classic
    This had to be one of the funniest movies ever made. Weak ending, though....more info
  • Top notch movie...deeper than most pro critics want it to be
    This is a stunner of a movie. I have seen it many times, but had to buy it for my home library. Michale Douglas, Robert Duvall are always good, but the acting talents of minor characters like the white supremist played by Frederick Forrest is stunningly good! (Forrest you may remember as Blue Duck in Lonesome Dove and also as "Chef" in "apocalypse now").
    You find yourself rooting for the "bad guy" (Douglas) not knowing he is the bad guy, he is avenging the everyday evils that face the average city dweller each day: traffic, crazy high prices in stop and rob stores, muggers, beggars who won't leave you alone and obviously don't need the money, poor service in fast food joints/stores, etc etc.
    Eventually working his way up the ladder to socio-economis inequalities, private golf courses, overpaid medical professionals etc.
    At some point, he realizes "So I'm the bad guy?"
    Duvall plays his solid role, he always amazes me in one movie he looks so young and the next so old...either he is great at makeup or just a heck of an actor! Get this movie or rent it...great stuff.
    ...more info
  • I probably like this movie TOO much (SYNOPTIC REVIEW, LOTS OF SPOILERS)***
    After a bad day at work, from time to time I just put this in the DVD player and skip everything except the confrontations between Bill Foster (aka "D-fens"), a man who snaps for reasons revealed to us as the movie progresses, and the people who get on his bad side. Abandoning his car in gridlock traffic, he marches across LA like a video game character, acquiring weapons and unleashing them on troublesome modern stereotypes all along the way. His destination: his daughter's birthday party (without an invite from his ex-wife).

    Foster's anachronistic appearance (a nerdy, bespectacled engineer complete with white shirt and pocket protector) match his plight--the once powerful white American working man who can't move into the present and accept the changes that have taken away his power and control of the world around him. Not that he is a racist. He makes that clear during his confrontation with a real one.

    Prendergast (the cop who is on the trail of D-fens), his basketcase of a wife, and his fellow cops are a complete annoyance, especially his ex-partner who's constantly trying to get him to jump into the sack with her.

    Foster's ex-wife's unsympathetic telephone needling and admission to the police that he never actually hit her lead one to suspect there are two sides to their story and he has not entirely deserved losing his daughter.

    The confrontation scenes are a bit contrived, never allowing anyone to intrude and interrupt or disrupt D-Fens's righteous speeches and violent actions against his antagonists. The scene where he walks away from a carload of dead and dying punks after they've crashed their car trying to do a drive-by on him looks like he's walking off of a set because the girlfriend of one of the punks waits patiently on the curb until D-fens leaves before rushing up to the car hysterically.

    The one person Foster encounters during his sojourn that I liked is the sarcastically sweet waitress at the Whammy Burger. She's the only one behind the counter who doesn't lose her cool when D-fens pulls out the AK-47 or whatever it is because they won't serve him breakfast. He certainly isn't the average jerky customer, and she's going to enjoy the moment, especially watching her idiot boss squirm as he is forced to deal with the situation. She seems fascinated with D-fens, almost like she'd run away and join him on his rampage if he asked her to.

    D-fens' only purely heroic act of the day is bashing in the face of the jerk yelling at the woman for cutting him off in the gridlocked traffic. He probably killed him. That's one I have to watch over and over again. So's the scene where he cuts the phone booth to ribbons with the machine gun because the impatient jerk behind him mouths off at him for taking too long to finish using it. Yes, I get a load of vicarious thrills out of watching this film, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.

    The darkly hilarious scene where D-fens makes an old fart at the golf course regret not letting him walk through the fairway makes this my favorite golf movie. I would gladly watch a four hour version of this film if D-fens spent all the additional time wreaking havoc and spreading panic all over the golf course, slipping a 4-iron and a pitching wedge into his bag of weapons, and climbing back over the fence, leaving the course to its onslaught of police helicopters, SWAT teams, ambulances and fire trucks.

    Having far passed the point of no return by the end of the film, D-fens realizes he has lost the game and makes his most sensible decision of the day.

    I would love to have seen a series of these movies. "Falling Down 2," etc. Just imagine how much fun D-fens could have while paying a Middle Eastern convenience store clerk $3.00 a gallon to (in his mind at least) subsidize terrorism, or shaking down a roofing crew for green cards and work visas.

    ...more info