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Red Dragon
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Customer Reviews:

  • Above and Beyond
    Thomas Harris's novel, Red Dragon, comes to life. Riveting expose of a life gone wrong. The movie starts out with an explanation of where "Silence of the Lambs" left us wondering. Hannibal is an out of control psychologist who just loves to mingle his love of culinary delights with his lust for murder. The beginning of the movie sets the scene - Hannibal at home, doing what he does best... Cooking up a frightful appetizer made from a flautists pancreas, served to the elite society that he loves to hate... Will Graham, FBI agent, pops in for a visit to discuss his latest thoughts of who the killer may be... Too bad Will, you are very close to being the main course -A flip of fate causes Graham to end up living a long life in the Florida Keys -- Deep scars from Hannibal's stiletto are vivid reminders of what the world holds for Graham. The story takes us through erotic turns and twisted horror -- A real page turner... The Dragon becomes a character we can all love to hate and who we all can understand -- he is a broken child. The product of a terrible life.

    This is a keeper....more info
  • Good Movie...
    After reading the book, it was good to see how the movie complimented it nicely. However, if it was a movie all on its own, it would have had a little bit of loose ends on some parts.

    The good things:

    Great acting. The characters truly play the parts. The troubled lives are shown very nicely.

    Good plot. A killer who picks out families and plans their deaths. An FBI agent who turns to a killer for advice. A murderer who is controlled by a fictitious painting. Its great.

    Good ending. Issues resolved. A good start for the next movie...

    Number of characters. There were many, but all of them accounted for and easy to keep up with.

    Bad things:

    Elaboration. The murderer (Dolarhyde) had a horrible childhood. Only about 30 seconds of his childhood are played in his mind. Not much idea of how troubled he really was.

    Overall, a great movie if you like forensics. Recommended on its own. Even more recommended if youve read the book.
    ...more info
  • Same scenario than "Silence of the lambs"
    Nothing new here, this is simply a pale copy of the first movie "The silence of the lambs", there is absolutely nothing new here. The kind of movie we have seen over and over again. Stick with the first movie. ...more info
  • Entertaining, if not distinctive
    Red Dragon is the prequel to the acclaimed Silence of the Lambs, and details how Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) was captured and his first cat-and-mouse game with FBI agent Will Graham (Edward Norton) as they hunt the serial killer known as the Tooth Fairy.

    There is an older version of Red Dragon known as Manhunter which did not star Hopkins in the signature role. That's probably why Universal opted for this remake, and there's definitely some appeal in seeing Hopkins do his thing again. The cast is made up of Hollywood all-stars. The script and acting are solid, and the movie is quite entertaining as a psychological thriller/horror film.

    The problem is that the film isn't really distinctive. Whereas Silence of the Lambs had a gritty feel, Red Dragon occasionally reeks of its Hollywood polish. It reuses a lot of what made Silence of the Lambs memorable, but doesn't add anything new. Even Hannibal, the controversial third movie, was very unique in what it did. Brett Ratner, though he's now done this, Rush Hour, and X-Men 3, still hasn't established a directorial style. He puts out a solid effort, but also because so much of the development and talent was already there. This is truly a Hollywood product that could've directed itself, and no matter how fun the film is, there's no escaping that.

    Fortunately Ratner packed the 2-disc edition with lots of bonus material, and he looks like he gave the film his all. We get a nice documentary, as well as lots of screen tests of various effects and makeup. It's a very strong dvd package, and worth the purchase over the single disc.

    Red Dragon comes up short when matched against the pedigree of the films before it, but its still an entertaining film and completes the Hannibal series nicely. ...more info
  • mediocre at best
    Prequels are usually like sequels in that they should never have been made. Just see Star Wars for a prominent example. Silence of the Lambs was a great movie and Anthony Hopkins was great as Hannibal Lecter. Red Dragon occurs before that story and we see a little of the crimes Hannibal committed as well as his capture, but little else. Instead we are shown a ho-hum story about another serial killer played by Ralph Feinnes. The story is not as suspensful and the killer is not as interesting as in Silence. Also, while I like Ed Norton, he was a poor choice to play the FBI investigator-very bland and dull. It was also tough to accept that this was before Silence since Anthony Hopkins looked older, fatter, and balder than in that movie. With such a strong cast I had high hopes for this, but it was ultimately disappointing. HD DVD picture quality was ok, but dark movies like this rarely look much better than the DVD-perhaps a bit sharper on my 106" screen. Maybe worth renting if you like this genre, but definitely not worth buying.

    ...more info
  • To understand the origin of evil, you must go back to the beginning.
    PLOT: The film opens with a brief prologue in Baltimore, 1980. A Baltimore Symphony Orchestra concert is going on, and in the audience is none other than everyone's favorite cannibal, Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins). The first flautist, Benjamin Raspail, doesn't seem to be too talented and botches up quite a few notes. A week later, Lecter has the members of the Symphony Board over for a dinner party. One of them mentions the fact that Benjamin Raspail is missing and presumed dead. Lecter serves everyone a strange, yet delicious dish. When one of the board members asks what it is, he replies, "If I tell you, I'm afraid you won't even try it." Later that night, FBI criminal profilist Will Graham (Edward Norton) shows up at Lecter's home. Graham and Lecter have been working together to track down serial killers for years. Graham thinks he has new evidence about an active serial killer dubbed the "Chesapeake Ripper". Graham noticed that all of the victim's lost some body part used in cooking. He believes that the Chesapeake Ripper is not keeping his souvenirs, he's eating them. Lecter asks Graham to come back in the morning so the two can revise their profile. He then leaves the room to get Graham's coat.Upon looking around at the object's in Lecter's office, Graham notices an antique medical book. Upon seeing Lecter's handwritten notes for "sweetbreads", Graham immediately knows that Lecter has been the Chesapeake Ripper all along. He turns around and gets stabbed in the abdomen by Lecter. Just as he is about to get killed, Graham stabs Lecter with a bundle of antique arrows. He then manages to fire a couple of shots into Lecter before the two lose consciousness. Years later, Graham (now retired and living in Florida) gets a visit from his old partner Jack Crawford (now played by Harvey Keitel). Crawford informs Graham that there is a new serial killer on the loose, dubbed as "The Tooth Fairy", and that he has already killed two families. He pleads with Graham to consider coming back to the FBI in hopes of trying to find the killer before he kills again. After careful consideration, Graham says goodbye to his wife Molly (Mary-Louise Parker) and son Josh and goes back to the FBI. Graham carefully studies the case file and sees that the Tooth Fairy killed both families in the exact same manner. He inserted mirror shards in their eyes after killing them and even left jagged bite marks on some of them (hence the nick-name). After reaching a dead end, Graham can't find any connection between the two families or why the Tooth Fairy chose to murder them. He decides to consult Dr. Lecter who now resides in solitary confinement in a maximum security facility; after all, Lecter did help Graham catch other serial killers early on in his career. Lecter decides to help Graham and looks at the case file. Graham knows that only Lecter can help him get in the mind of such a bizarre serial killer, but he hopes that he finds him before the next full moon, the only time the Tooth Fairy (Ralph Fiennes) strikes.


    COMMENTS: Brett Ratner's film adaptation of Thomas Harris's novel is not the first. It was originally made in 1986 under the title Manhunter. Now, thanks to Ratner, we can finally see Harris's original vision. Manhunter director Michael Mann changed around the story in his screenplay, and several elements of the story were either lost or watered down, including the titular sub-plot involving the Tooth Fairy's obession with the Red Dragon. Since Manhunter's release, two other films based on Harris's novels were released which firmly established Anthony Hopkins as Dr. Hannibal Lecter, so it was only natural that he play Lecter again in Ratner's film. Silence of the Lambs screenwriter Ted Tally returned to adapt the screenplay for Red Dragon. I especially liked the prologue at the beginning which shows how Will Graham captured Lecter, a scene which was actually absent from the novel. Tally also completely restored the sub-plots involving the reasons for Francis Dolarhyde's (The Tooth Fairy) madness, as well as his obsession with the William Blake paintint "The Great Red Dragon and the Woman Clothed in the Sun." Since this film takes place before The Silence of the Lambs, Rattner went to great efforts to make Hopkins appear younger. At one point he even considered digitally de-aging the actor, a technique he later used in his film X-Men: The Last Stand (2006). It brought back chills to once again see Lecter occupying the original cell from Silence. The Hannibal Lecter films starring Anthony Hopkins all seem to follow the same formula. All three were made by very different directors (Jonathan Demme for Silence of the Lambs, Ridley Scott for Hannibal) who in turn made three very unique moods for the films. Even though the films are part of a trilogy, they all work as stand alone films as well. You don't need to watch them in any particular order to know what is going on. Sometimes I watch the films in release date order and sometimes I watch them in chronological order; it doesn't really matter. The film itself features an all-star ensemble cast. I thought that Harvey Keitel as Jack Crawford was a good replacement for Silence's Scott Glenn. Lecter's nemesis Dr. Chilton (played by Anthony Heald) makes a return from Silence, as does Barney Matthews (played by Frankie Faison) from Silence and Hannibal. The character of Barney Matthews actually doesn't appear in the novel, but Ted Tally felt that it would only make sense that he be in the film. Ralph Fiennes gave a very creepy performance as Francis Dolarhyde; not necessarily better than Tom Noonan's in Manhunter, but different. Tally also restored Harris's original ending for the film. He even added an epilogue which sets up the film for the events in The Silence of the Lambs. Overall I think that the film is a much more faithful film than Michael Mann's Manhunter. After this film was released, Hopkins announced that he would never be portraying the character of Dr. Hannibal Lecter again. Harris wrote a prequel novel, entitled Hannibal Rising, in 2006. The novel chronicles the life of the young Hannibal Lecter. A film adaptation was released in early 2007, but unfortunately Hopkins refused to appear in the film for a brief cameo or even a voice narrative. This DVD features the film in the original theatrical widescreen ratio. It is loaded with special features including a Making Of documentary, Commentary by Brett Ratner and Ted Tally, Hannibal Lecter's FBI Case File, The Life History of Hannibal Lecter, and much more. ...more info
  • ANTHONY HOPKINS STEALS THE SHOW...
    Based upon the wonderful, well-written novel "Red Dragon" by Thomas Harris, this is a superior and chilling thriller. Grim and gripping, it features Edward Norton in the role of troubled, retired FBI agent, Will Graham, who is called back to service in order to track down a bizarre serial killer, known as the "Tooth Fairy". It appears that Graham has the uncanny ability to get into a killer's mindset and figure out what his next move might be. It is as if he and the killer become one. In his preparation for this, Graham even consults the imprisoned Hannibal Lecter (yes, THE Hannibal Lecter), deliciously played by Anthony Hopkins. Unfortunately for Graham, Hannibal has not forgotten that Graham was responsible for his changed circumstances.

    It is Hannibal Lecter, after all, who was the catalyst for Will Graham's retirement. The viewer is treated to scenes of Lecter's life, before he was revealed to be Hannibal the Cannibal, one of the sickest serial killers ever to strike. The viewer sees the renowned psychiatrist in his milieu as an erudite, cultured, and wealthy patron of the arts. A noted gourmand, Dr. Lecter liked nothing better than to give intimate dinner parties for the favored few. Of course, some of the ingredients used for his dinners were best left unsaid. It was nice to see the always excellent John Rubenstein in the small role of a dinner guest, heaping accolades upon Hannibal for his dinner parties.

    The movie is compelling and, at all times, gripping. Anthony Hopkins reprises his career defining role and steals the show (Really, Hannibal Lecter has become all but a cottage industry for him!). With a twinkle in his eye, he is, in his low key way, deliciously malevolent. Edward Norton, one of the best young actors around, gives a decent and sensitive portrayal of Will Graham, the angst ridden former FBI agent and profiler, but lacks the grittiness and hard-edged veneer that the role really demands. He also simply looks too young and soft for the role. Ralph Fiennes gives a fine performance as the tormented Francis Dolarhyde, but his portrayal is hampered by the fact that too little is revealed in the film about what makes him tick.

    Emily Watson affectingly plays a blind woman who becomes romantically involved with Francis Dolarhyde. It is her involvement with him that helps bring the film to its stunning conclusion. Moreover, Ms. Watson is a wonderfully talented British actress who manages to get her American accent down pat. Good performances by Harvey Keitel, as Graham's former boss, and Mary Louise Parker, as Graham's wife, round out this fine, ensemble cast.

    This film is a taut, unnerving psychological thriller that is subject to comparison to its 1986 predecessor "Manhunter". Having seen both, I call it a draw. This current version had a bigger budget, so obviously it has better production values. Also, the opening scenes in the current version are more interesting than those in the 1986 one. Music, however, was used to much better effect in the earlier version. Moreover, the final scenes in the earlier version were much better than in this later version, as they were much more suspenseful. Both films, however, are worth watching. Do yourself a favor and view both. Then, judge for yourself....more info
  • Very powerful
    "Red Dragon" is a very interesting piece of modern cinema. It is scary, filled with action and suspence and has a very subtle underlying sense of humour. The cast performs very well, Anthony Hopkins reprising his probably most well known role as evil incarnate, Hannibal Lecter, and Edward Norton giving a performance nothing short of sheer brilliance. Norton was not really my bag prior to seeing this movie, but he performs so well that it immediately changed my mind. We can quite easily identify with his troubles, his tormented self and can almost hear the gears churning when he investigates a murder scene. Ralph Fiennes also delivers a great performance as the twisted murderer the "tooth fairy". There is a subtle feeling of madness underscoring the rage in him. Very good indeed. Very notable also is Philip Seymour Hoffman as the hack writer Freddy Lounds. In the short screen time that he has he still manages to leave us all with a very deep impression. In fact, the movie is, in a word, well cast and well performed.

    The direction, editing and scoring of the film is equally up to par and really captures the mood perfectly.

    The ending, as another reviewer remarked, is, although similar to the one in the book, not as powerful. This is probably because of the crowdpleasing factor. It is after all a hollywood movie. Then again, one shouldn't measure it against the book, but see it as an independent picture.

    In short: this is definitely a film to watch. Highest possible recommendation....more info
  • Good Re-Make Of Early 'Lecter Film'
    This is a very good "remake" of Manhunter" which was the first Hannibal Lecter movie but didn't get the press the others did because it didn't have Anthony Hopkins as the famous criminal.

    After "Silence of the Lambs" became so popular, and the sequel, "Hannibal," it was decided to re-do that first film and this time obtain Hopkins' services.It worked because not only do you have the incomparable Hopkins at Dr. Lecter but you have one this generations best actors, Edward Norton, as the leading character "Will Graham."

    Norton, as always, gives a solid performance. And - look at the backup cast: Ralph Fiennes, Emily Watson, Harvey Keitel, Mary Louise Parker and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Not bad.

    This is one of those movies that gets better and better with each viewing. On my first look, I was disappointed Hopkins didn't have a bigger role but, after I knew what to expect, subsequent viewings made me appreciate the film's effort as a whole, and it's an underrated flick and a fine addition to the "Lecter" series.
    ...more info
  • Highly Rewatchable
    I don't know what it is about this movie, but it's one I find myself watching alot. While all the performances are above average, I found Fiennes and Watson to be the most interesting part of the film. Their tragic romance, coupled with the infamous scene w/Hoffman, help liven up what could have been a very average thriller. I thought Norton was a little ho-hum, and while I like Hopkins alot, I was somewhat disheartened to see him primarily used as comic relief. But these are actually minor flaws, and while this film is far from perfect, it generally sticks to the novel by Thomas Harris(one of the best thrillers ever written; if you haven't read the book, you should...). An enjoyable, B-grade masterpiece....more info
  • ANTHONY HOPKINS STEALS THE SHOW...
    Based upon the wonderful, well-written novel "Red Dragon" by Thomas Harris, this is a superior and chilling thriller. Grim and gripping, it features Edward Norton in the role of troubled, retired FBI agent, Will Graham, who is called back to service in order to track down a bizarre serial killer, known as the "Tooth Fairy". It appears that Graham has the uncanny ability to get into a killer's mindset and figure out what his next move might be. It is as if he and the killer become one. In his preparation for this, Graham even consults the imprisoned Hannibal Lecter (yes, THE Hannibal Lecter), deliciously played by Anthony Hopkins. Unfortunately for Graham, Hannibal has not forgotten that Graham was responsible for his changed circumstances.

    It is Hannibal Lecter, after all, who was the catalyst for Will Graham's retirement. The viewer is treated to scenes of Lecter's life, before he was revealed to be Hannibal the Cannibal, one of the sickest serial killers ever to strike. The viewer sees the renowned psychiatrist in his milieu as an erudite, cultured, and wealthy patron of the arts. A noted gourmand, Dr. Lecter liked nothing better than to give intimate dinner parties for the favored few. Of course, some of the ingredients used for his dinners were best left unsaid. It was nice to see the always excellent John Rubenstein in the small role of a dinner guest, heaping accolades upon Hannibal for his dinner parties.

    The movie is compelling and, at all times, gripping. Anthony Hopkins reprises his career defining role and steals the show (Really, Hannibal Lecter has become all but a cottage industry for him!). With a twinkle in his eye, he is, in his low key way, deliciously malevolent. Edward Norton, one of the best young actors around, gives a decent and sensitive portrayal of Will Graham, the angst ridden former FBI agent and profiler, but lacks the grittiness and hard-edged veneer that the role really demands. He also simply looks too young and soft for the role. Ralph Fiennes gives a fine performance as the tormented Francis Dolarhyde, but his portrayal is hampered by the fact that too little is revealed in the film about what makes him tick.

    Emily Watson affectingly plays a blind woman who becomes romantically involved with Francis Dolarhyde. It is her involvement with him that helps bring the film to its stunning conclusion. Moreover, Ms. Watson is a wonderfully talented British actress who manages to get her American accent down pat. Good performances by Harvey Keitel, as Graham's former boss, and Mary Louise Parker, as Graham's wife, round out this fine, ensemble cast.

    This film is a taut, unnerving psychological thriller that is subject to comparison to its 1986 predecessor "Manhunter. Having seen both, I call it a draw. This current version had a bigger budget, so obviously it has better production values. Also, the opening scenes in the current version are more interesting than those in the 1986 one. Music, however, was used to much better effect in the earlier version. Moreover, the final scenes in the earlier version were much better than in this later version, as they were much more suspenseful. Both films, however, are well worth watching. Do yourself a favor and view both. Then, judge for yourself....more info
  • Wonderfully Creepy!
    When Red Dragon first came out on DVD, my wife raved about it, but I never got around to seeing it until this afternoon. Red Dragon is a tightly wound psycho-drama, and very tense crime suspense drama. This is really Anthony Hopkins best role, and Edward Norton is an actor who always surprises me. He seems so unassuming but always manages to pull off the believable hero. Here as a retired FBI profiler who bested Hannibal before only after he managed to get "killed" first, is using the mad doctor's "help" to catch another serial killer, if he can only protect himself and his family long enough to do it.

    Red Dragon takes you right up to the timeline when Lecter meets Claire at the begging of The Silence of the Lambs (Two-Disc Collector's Edition) and is absolutely a good (if somewhat disturbing) watch. Not for Kids or Family viewing, this is a definite "R" movie.

    But if you are in the mood for something "Dark" Red Dragon may be right up your metaphorical alley!
    ...more info
  • Very eatable pulp
    First there was "Manhunter", Michael Mann's ice cold, clinical approach of what would later be series of `Hannibal Lecter series'. And to say this is to make a mistake a lot of people make: Hannibal Lecter is just a suporting character in the book by Thomas Harris and the movie (then played by British actor Brian Cox).

    The real story is about Will Graham, a retired cop who comes back to the scene of homocide, because his keen eye for detail must help the local police department in their desperate search for a brutal serial killer, called the "Tooth Fairy". Graham was played by the then relatively unknown William Petersen and it is his troubled mind and his ambivalence against going back to the very technique of profiling and re-living the feelings and thoughts the alledged killer must have that sent him to early retirement, that gives his character and the movie an underlying sense of unease.

    "Manhunter" remained rather unnoticed at the time of release. And only because of the fact that it is now officially the first in an on going series with a highly likeble classic literature quoting cannibal, it has coem out of oblivion a bit, and justifiably so; the movie is better than expected, even though it seems to be a bit dated with it's typical eighties electronic soundtrack.

    Then there was "The silence of the lambs", the highly acclaimed movie by Jonathan Demme with a bigger part for the Lecter guy. And again it would be wrong to call it "another Hannibal Lecter movie". But Anthony Hopkins does have his moments as the caged-in psychiatrist a.k.a.man-eating monster, who drops viable clues at the right moment so a dedicated FBI trainee, Jodi Foster, could help the Department catch another brutal slayer.

    Hopkins immediately was and still is the embodiment of Hannibal Lecter, and would return in two more movies, "Hannibal" and the "Manhunter"-remake "Red Dragon". The latter was obviously created to give the Hannibal character more time and space then in the Michael Mann original, giving the fans of the New Movie Psycho what they wanted.

    Having said this I want to make clear that Hopkins may be synonymous to Hannibal, that doesn't mean that he is per se better than Brian Cox. Hopkins, with his hissing, sneering and his constant sardonic looks from under his eye brows, is more of a movie-bad guy, while Cox, with his naturalistic approach, was more realistic.
    In other words, within two seconds you can see that Hopkins' Hannibal is a nasty goul you should ignore when he invites you to diner, while Cox' version is that of an ordinary man who can easily delude and deceit without you knowing for a second you will be the dessert for that night.

    Now there is "Red Dragon" and first of all it can be said that it doesn't have the qualities of the original "Manhunter". Edward Norton is simply unconvincing as an experienced FBI profiler, Harvey Keitel goes through the numbers and doesn't add anything to the part, Ralph Fiennes does his best being the tormented Tooth Fairy, as does Emily Watson, and Philip Seymour Hoffman has a funny bit as a sleazy reporter. Movie goers like to see familiar faces, likable faces of the moviestars they like, but "Red dragon" shows that an overkill of instant-recognizable actors can also damage things. Perhaps a cast of lesser known actors would be better so the carefully build-up tension remains, in stead of being shattered by another cheap sensation of "Hey, I know that face. Last year he was in that and that movie..."

    But being inferior to the original doesn't mean that your time is wasted. Just watch the movie for what it is, easy degestable pulp. Good story about a troubled cop going after a troubled maniac, being helped in the process by a troubled ex-psychiatrist who again drops viable clues at exactly the right moments.
    ...more info
  • ANTHONY HOPKINS STEALS THE SHOW...
    Based upon the wonderful, well-written novel "Red Dragon" by Thomas Harris, this is a superior and chilling thriller. Grim and gripping, it features Edward Norton in the role of troubled, retired FBI agent, Will Graham, who is called back to service in order to track down a bizarre serial killer, known as the "Tooth Fairy". It appears that Graham has the uncanny ability to get into a killer's mindset and figure out what his next move might be. It is as if he and the killer become one. In his preparation for this, Graham even consults the imprisoned Hannibal Lecter (yes, THE Hannibal Lecter), deliciously played by Anthony Hopkins. Unfortunately for Graham, Hannibal has not forgotten that Graham was responsible for his changed circumstances.

    It is Hannibal Lecter, after all, who was the catalyst for Will Graham's retirement. The viewer is treated to scenes of Lecter's life, before he was revealed to be Hannibal the Cannibal, one of the sickest serial killers ever to strike. The viewer sees the renowned psychiatrist in his milieu as an erudite, cultured, and wealthy patron of the arts. A noted gourmand, Dr. Lecter liked nothing better than to give intimate dinner parties for the favored few. Of course, some of the ingredients used for his dinners were best left unsaid. It was nice to see the always excellent John Rubenstein in the small role of a dinner guest, heaping accolades upon Hannibal for his dinner parties.

    The movie is compelling and, at all times, gripping. Anthony Hopkins reprises his career defining role and steals the show (Really, Hannibal Lecter has become all but a cottage industry for him!). With a twinkle in his eye, he is, in his low key way, deliciously malevolent. Edward Norton, one of the best young actors around, gives a decent and sensitive portrayal of Will Graham, the angst ridden former FBI agent and profiler, but lacks the grittiness and hard-edged veneer that the role really demands. He also simply looks too young and soft for the role. Ralph Fiennes gives a fine performance as the tormented Francis Dolarhyde, but his portrayal is hampered by the fact that too little is revealed in the film about what makes him tick.

    Emily Watson affectingly plays a blind woman who becomes romantically involved with Francis Dolarhyde. It is her involvement with him that helps bring the film to its stunning conclusion. Moreover, Ms. Watson is a wonderfully talented British actress who manages to get her American accent down pat. Good performances by Harvey Keitel, as Graham's former boss, and Mary Louise Parker, as Graham's wife, round out this fine, ensemble cast.

    This film is a taut, unnerving psychological thriller that is subject to comparison to its 1986 predecessor "Manhunter. Having seen both, I call it a draw. This current version had a bigger budget, so obviously it has better production values. Also, the opening scenes in the current version are more interesting than those in the 1986 one. Music, however, was used to much better effect in the earlier version. Moreover, the final scenes in the earlier version were much better than in this later version, as they were much more suspenseful. Both films, however, are well worth watching. Do yourself a favor and view both. Then, judge for yourself....more info
  • Maybe I'll watch Manhunter, some day
    While it lasted this seemed quite respectably sick and nasty, but after it finished I thought: Hmm. Then I read the seriously critical reviews, and they began to explain why this show didn't satisfy. There was something empty about it, although I had a sort of advantage, in that I'd seen Silence, but not Manhunter. With this fine cast I thought I couldn't go wrong, but it became obvious that it was mostly just a cash-cow, milking the crowd-pulling Hannibal. Actually, I didn't think Silence was all that marvellous, either. The idea is that one homicidal loony can understand the mentality of another homicidal loony; but that's the only real idea, and after that it's just play it again, Sam. Oh, I suppose underlying this is that we're all loonies, since we can understand the other loonies. Then we can thrill to the sight of the handicapped, hare-lipped and blind, and the thought that happy, healthy, normal, nuclear families are getting massacred. It's all fairly sick, really. Richard III is better. ...more info
  • The best sequel of the film The Silence of The Lambs
    Like the silence of the lambs ,this movie is based on a novel,this movie was made to have the look of the original Dr. Lecter film , unlike Hannibal.Anthony Hopkins reprices the role who won an academy award for his brilliant and creepy interpretation.This is a prequel to silence of the lambs.
    In this one a crazy psycho,who like Buffalo Bill kills people very carefully and with style,is on the loose.His name is the tooth fairy.The only way to stop him is to get help from Hannibal the Cannibal who is behind bars(actually a glass) for his crimes and cannibalism.This is a great movie!...more info
  • Very awesome movie
    Its better than manhunt the original of this movie I think it picks up parts that were left out in the original even thou its diffrent actors it is the same stoyline but i like the way this one plays out it has more action in it....more info