Ubuntu 8.04 [OLD VERSION]
List Price: $12.99

Our Price: $0.01

You Save: $12.98 (100%)

 


Features:
  • Award-winning Linux operating system with complete set of open source applications for desktops, laptops, and servers
  • Office productivity suite, Web browser, and email for your everyday needs
  • Instant messaging, image editing, and various tools for accessing and managing your multimedia files
  • Free security updates delivered via the Internet for 18 months on the desktop and server
  • Comprehensive DVD with desktop and server installation, alternate installation (e.g., OEM install), plus all of the supported add-on software and translations for dozens of languages

Customer Reviews:

  • Ubuntu for Linux
    This CD was an excellent way to get started with Ubuntu. (I highly recommend Ubuntu as a well rounded Linux operating system distribution. It is well supported with LOTS of software available on the internet (for free) to meet your needs) While Ubuntu can be downloaded from the internet for free, I found that even with DSL it was going to take several hours. Once installed, updates are easy to get and install. This item was shipped and delivered in a very timely manner....more info
  • bad disk
    the disk that I received had more than 168 errors on it. I could not install...more info
  • Great Product, but Only Buy if You Must
    I like this Ubuntu build. It seemed to suit me well, and since I didn't know anyone with a copy, use a limited Internet speed PC, and wanted to receive the DVD free second day, I chose to purchase free Ubuntu 8.04 on Amazon.com. If you find yourself in a similar situation, avoid getting bogged down with the philosophical aspects of life and just go for it; Let's not get weird about it. With a price tag showing under [...] bucks for open-source use on an unlimited number of systems, please do not let anyone insult your intelligence by comparing the sale of this product on Amazon to a company that shamelessly sells single-workstation operating system software at prices in excess of $[...]. By the way, I'm enjoying learning about ubuntu linux, and hope to fully convert to this type of shareware in the future. Thank you for reading, and God bless you. : )...more info
  • Rate the product not Amazon
    I have read several "reviews" here and find one at least to be simply silly. Note to complainers about the charge here for Ubuntu: If you don't want to support the folks who actually go to the trouble of making a professionally produced installable DVD, take your $13 elsewhere. You are only making yourself look stupid - like you need this review to do that.

    There are myriad people who do not want to be bothered with downloading a huge file and then figuring out how to make an installable CD or DVD who want to get an alternative to M$ who also trust Amazon. This is only one of several options available.

    Personally, I downloaded it and burned 30 DVDs for people who were somewhat timid but who now are very satisfied getting away from Vista to an O/S that actually works and gives them Open Office and GIMP.

    The implied suggestion here is to go elsewhere but don't downgrade a great, entry level piece of software because you don't want to pay a lousy $13.

    As for this distro, well done, easy to install, I put it on a couple of homebuilts, an HP desktop, an Acer desktop, and a Lenovo Thinkpad. All went flawlessly - no driver issues at all. Plain and simple, Ubuntu is a class act making the open source world available for everyone, not just those with enough smack to "buy" XP or Vista. The only better alternative is Leopard but the outlay for the machine stands in many people's way. This O/S can go on any machine out there, legacy to SOTA....more info
  • The BEST bargain in computing
    Ubuntu 8.04 DVD
    I have replaced my 150.00 copy of Windows XP with this operating system.
    In addition, I have used it to install a huge amount of mathematical and
    astronomical software- free of added charge. Finally, I installed WINE,
    a Windows emulator which enables me to use some of my old, paid-for, software. What a marvelous product, and what a wonderful spirit behind
    the development of it.
    I recommend this product without hesitation!...more info
  • No Windows
    Works great and is a lot more user friendly than the last version of SUSE linux that I tried....more info
  • It is outdated version. New release is available.
    Ubuntu always gets my best words but new version 8.10 (released on October 30, 2008) is already available:
    Kubuntu Ubuntu Ver. 8.10 and Linux Training Library 2DVD+CD...more info
  • Ubuntu: Not Easy to Learn, but Well Worth the Effort!!
    First off don't get Ubuntu, load it onto your computer, and expect to be off and running right away. If you've spent years using Windows or Mac OSX, Ubuntu's learning curve is about as steep as it gets.

    Secondly, make one-to-one backups as often as possible of all your data.

    Lastly, Ubuntu is not Windows. I won't go into detail about it here. Do a Google search to find out more.

    After saying all this if you do decide to get Ubuntu and put the effort into learning how it works, and if you're like me, then you won't regret it. Even if you dual-boot with Windows, like I do, you will spend most of your time using Ubuntu. It is more secure, stable, and efficient than windows. It will use fewer resources on your computer but make better use of them.

    I've been back and forth a few times. Recently I switched back to using Vista for three months because I thought Vista must surely be fleshed out by now, and be at least as rock-solid as Ubuntu. I thought wrong. After just a few months Vista began to slow down. It seemed to be using more and more resources. And I just didn't find I was getting work done as easily as I did with Ubuntu.

    One very disconcerting thing that happened to me was when the Outlook trial I downloaded seemed to disappear, taking all my contacts, mail, and data with it. I never learned what was wrong with it. Good thing it was a trial and I made backups of everything.

    You don't have to be a geek to learn to use Ubuntu (although it helps). You do have to be patient and be willing to take on that learning curve. It's like learning a new language. And like anything in life, what you put into it will be what you get out of it.

    For me the rewards of having a reliable, stable, secure computer to store all my valuable data far outweighs the costs of spending the time to learn how to use it. And knowing that I'm no longer reliant on a corporation to be able to access and store my personal data gives me a feeling of security and self-reliance that you just can't put a price-tag on.

    ...more info
  • Terrific transition to linux.
    I have a Mac and two Windows based PCs. When the hard drive on the laptop died, Windows died with it because it came loaded on a partition and not with a disc. I took the plunge with Ubuntu. Wow, as soon as it loaded, I was up and running with terrific software all for free. The only thing I still have not figured out is the WiFi so I am stuck with a connection to my router for now. If you need the idiot proof built in solutions to everything then stay with Windows, but if you can follow step by step directions, then go with Ubuntu. Personally, I am a convert. No more frightfully expensive programming for me....more info
  • It is old, outdated version! New version is available.
    Ubuntu always gets my best words but version 8.10 (released on October 30, 2008) is already available:
    Kubuntu Ubuntu Ver. 8.10 and Linux Training Library 2DVD+CD...more info
  • So you want to use Linux?
    I abandoned Windows a year ago and got a Macbook pro with OS X and put Ubuntu on my other Laptop which had previously contained windows. Well after months of using Linux I found that it was nothing more than a pain. I was sick of being limited to everything: games, programs, sound, wireless internet and I was sick of reading threw Linux books and forums getting nowhere. All the great things that Ubuntu users list here that they can do with Linux and comparing it to Windows.....these people know how and like to spend all their time configuring an operating system just to get the functionality you automatically get with Windows or OS X. I hear talk of the WINE program....Linux will never run games like Windows or as smoothly. Linux is no more secure than OS X or windows with the security updates and Windows Live One Care. With Linux you can configure for long periods of wasted time to make your screen look cool and do tricks....wow....I want an OS that works for me and has functionality not an OS I have to make work in every aspect at every corner by configuring for hours on end. I can use Linux, OS X, and Windows (3.1-Vista) exceptionally well, but to release a new Ubuntu that still has all the same wireless, sound and sanity problems is just lame. If you are an average computer user avoid Linux you'll never get it to work, if you are an avid computer user save yourself wasted time and use Windows/OS X, if you are a technical space caddett with no life other than Linux then try Ubuntu Linux 8.04 you will have lots of configuring to do. One comparision for average users: Boot up two computers one with any Linux version and one with any windows/OSX version. Try something simple like access the internet or play an mp3, see which one gets it done first from scratch. With OS X or windows it's a double click with Linux.....good luck. Linux is open source which means it's free. It also means that it isn't maintained and your updates or fixes come from an unknown party rather than a reliable company. Who do you trust your OS to? Apple? Microsoft? or some guy from a linux forum....more info
  • Ubuntu
    Put the disk in your CD drive and let it fly. I am new to Linux but did not have any problems with the install on an older laptop. With some help from the on-line Ubuntu community, I was able to install printer drivers and deal with a troublesome issue with the wireless card that was install on the computer - the wireless chipset maker would not release the specs so someone in the community reverse engineered the drivers!...more info
  • Much Better Than Most Know & Windows Had Better Watch It!
    Before I begin, let me state that I've been in computer tech services for the last 20+ years in one form or another. I've tried Windows from version 3 on up to Vista, Mac from every OS imaginable (and even when they were known as Apples or MacIntosh) along with DOS, FreeDOS and several versions of Linux (Suse, DSL, Red Hat, Ubuntu, etc).

    Without a doubt, Ubuntu 8.04 is the most polished Linux version I've seen recently. Some may argue that versions like Suse 11 look better, and I can't argue with the artistic merits of the latter, but I'm referring to overall user friendliness. Ubuntu is going to give Windows and Mac a run for the money and considering Ubuntu costs little to nothing, you getting more bang for the buck.

    For my experiment I got a 32 bit version of Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron) and put it on an HP Pavilon DV9000 laptop running, unfortunately, MS Vista Home Premium as the original OS.

    Here are the high points in comparison with that version of Vista (which, by the way, was the new "improved" SP1 variation):

    * Cost. Vista Basic, about $175 on sale. Home Premium runs about $225 or so. Business and Ultimate versions can approach the dangerously high $400 mark. OS X runs about $170. Ubuntu? Free if you download it, about $5 if you buy a disk and, again, free if you order a disk from the Ubuntu website (it does take 4 to 8 weeks to get it through the mail, though). Beware of places selling them for $12 or more. That's a clip. In case you didn't know, Windows preloaded on a new computer generally adds $200 to the price.

    * Initial installation time. Ubuntu erased my hard drive and installed itself within 35 minutes, including yanking some updates off my DSL connection. What about Windows? On average, about 2 hours not including updates.

    * Installation parameters. Want to install Vista on your old XP machine? Fat chance, you'll probably get an "incompatible hardware" error message. With Ubuntu, or any version of Linux, you can pretty much load it on any old piece of machinery out there. I've installed it on old 20 pound laptops running at 20Mhz with 64 MB RAM. I even got it to run on an early 80s Apple Lisa (for those of you who remember than stinker computer).

    * Boot time. About 30 seconds with Ubuntu and 256 RAM. Vista with 1 GB RAM can take minutes to boot and cycle. Even with the 3 GB on my laptop, it still took at least 2 minutes to boot with Vista. Add another couple minutes if you have anti-virus, firewall, or both running.

    * Overall safety. Ever heard of a virus being written strictly for Linux? Chances are you never will. When I was in college for computer studies a couple years we purposely loaded a virus written for Windows on a Linux computer and forced it to run. It did absolutely nothing to the machine. Windows accounts for roughly 85% of the computers out there so guess what the average hacker will right nasty programs for?

    * RAM usage. This was frustrating. I had a RAM and CPU usage meter on my Vista OS and it showed all 3 GB being used by Vista during peak times. This resulted in a slow processing of some information and programs. Even at idle it hogged 1 GB. Ubuntu? It doesn't care. 128 MB is the minimum but anything above that is gravy.

    * Recognition of hardware. Ubuntu recognized my SATA hard drive (this was problematic with earlier versions), my wireless card, my NVDIA video card, USB ports, etc, etc. The only thing it didn't recognize was the Lightscribe drive (it recognized it as a burner, but not as a Lightscribe burner); however, it did download the necessary drivers when I booted up. Vista? It refused to accept my wireless card nor did it recognize Lightscribe or attempt to download the necessary software. For whatever reason, Vista did not recognize my 250 GB hard drive as a single unit (on my model it is, I dumped the split hard drive when I bought it). Vista insisted on splitting it in 2 and naming one C and the other D thereby relegating my CD burner to E. Of note, the wireless card was a standard Atheros model, nothing special. This should prove no challenge for any OS.

    * Outside hardware recognition. Vista offered to find a driver for my Samsung laser printer and then never found it. I had to hunt on my own. Ubuntu took less than 15 seconds to accept my printer and never blinked an eye. Ditto for my digital camera. In fact, Vista refused to accept a flash drive that was 8 GB in size. In one case, I had a flash drive I used under XP that was listed as drive E on that computer and Vista recognized it as drive F and then refused to access the files on it because they were loaded when the drive was E. I understand this problem has been solved with SP1. No problem with Ubuntu with the same exact drive.

    * OS wizardry. Do you like the Aero effects in Vista? Ubuntu has those, too, but I ignore them. I use a computer to compute, not be dazzled by special effects. If you want them, Ubuntu has them.

    * Eye candy. Ubuntu comes with a limited variety of desktop wallpapers, all of which are various shades of brown. While Vista does have a wide array of desktop wallpapers, fact is you can merely download what you want when you want off the Internet. Again, this is personal preference. Most computer users I know have pictures of their families, pets, or both on the desktop so what's included is academic.

    * Acceptance of outside programs. I use Opera or FireFox as web browsers and ignore Internet Explorer. Guess what? Vista doesn't like that. So much so it would take over a minute to open Opera. Ubuntu doesn't care. It takes less than 10 seconds to open either version. Want MS Office on your computer? That'll set you back about $200 or more. Instead I use OpenOffice and its suite. Grand total cost? $0. It's free just like 99% of the Linux programs out there. Besides, if you want MS programs, you either have to go to a store or order online. With Linux, merely use the apt-get command at the terminal and download them for free within a few seconds or minutes. If this is Greek to you, it won't be once you start using it. You can find online tutorials that will help you in this matter. If nothing else, take the money you saved on not buying Windows and purchase a book titled, "Ubuntu for Non Geeks". Great book that covers the basics and advanced aspects.

    * Software compatibility. Windows is the master of this domain. When you hear document compatibility you usually hear "Word" in deference to the MS word processor. Ditto for Excel (spreadsheets), Access (databases) and PowerPoint (presentations). Problem is, this dominance is based upon user ignorance - they just don't know that other programs exist out there than can do the job just as well. Corel's WordPerfect has suffered from this for over a decade (it costs a lot less and does just the same as Word). Ubuntu's version of these programs is included in the OpenOffice suite that comes prepackaged on the disk. It will run Windows documents and it will also save in the Windows format. You can trade back and forth as you like. Same can be said for most other programs. If there is a Window's version, there will be a cross compatible Ubuntu version and the cost will generally be 100% less.

    * Software upgrading. Vista software, such as MS Word, will cost you dearly to update and the OS itself doesn't remind you to update or that an update exists. Ubuntu will notify you that an update exists and asks you if you want to upgrade for free.

    * Number of programs. Vista and Linux have thousands of programs. The problem is finding them. Not all stores carry all versions of Vista software and, truthfully, most stores seem to carry about 10% of what's available. With Linux you merely go to the repositories available and download what you like for free. The nice thing about Linux is that each distribution knows what works and what doesn't. When Vista first came out a couple years ago one frustrating problem was Vista's insistence on sometimes accepting XP programs and sometimes not. Unfortunately, you didn't know until you attempted to load it and then you'd find out no refunds for opened software.

    * Wireless acceptance and usability. Vista does have an edge here. I never went under 3 bars inside my house with Vista but Ubuntu seems to stall at 2, possibly 3 on a good day. I understand this is a Linux software problem that should be solved soon. Of note, Ubuntu lags in download speeds on wireless. I could never best 250 Mbps consistently while Vista pushed 480 all the time on my DSL wireless connection. Again, a software problem; however, if you have your network connected via hard wire, the download speeds are the same between both Vista and Ubuntu.

    * Other considerations. Linux by its virtue of being "open source" (aka, free) has a problem playing DVDs with copyright restrictions; however, it'll be more than happy to download the necessary free software to get around that problem. Weird thing is, Ubuntu has no problem playing MP3s and will even play sound files with odd suffixes attached.

    * Insistence on interfering. Vista insists that you are an idiot that needs to be guided in everything you do. Just about everything requires a password and if you should bypass the password requirement, it will bug you to no end to reinstate it. Ubuntu can be the same way in some respects, but generally when you're downloading programs from an unknown source. It pretty much leaves you alone otherwise.

    * User friendliness. Linux has definitely gotten better from the days it was a command line OS much like DOS. Many users are weaned on Windows or Mac and are wary of Linux because it's "different". The fact remains it is different but not so much so that you can't pick up on it within a couple hours. I can remember when Windows came out and users were afraid to switch from DOS. For years Windows packaged DOS with Windows for those who were reluctant to switch.

    Overall, Ubuntu is a much better OS than Vista and comes close to matching OS X Leopard from Apple. From a cost and expandability standpoint, it beats both. It is much more forgiving with older computers than either Vista or OS X.

    Oh, and by the way, don't forget to pick the proper version. 32 bit works with any computer out there but the 64 bit OS will only work with 64 bit processors. If you don't know what you have or plan to use Ubuntu on several computers, I would recommend the 32 bit version as a safe bet.
    ...more info
  • Great Product, Awful Price
    Normally I'd choose amazon.com to find the lowest prices. However on Linux operating systems this isn't the case. To anyone in the U.S. who is interested in Ubuntu I'd recommend going to [.....]. Their service is great and I haven't had one bad disk from them. They charge a flat rate of $0.99 per cd and $1.99 per dvd. Shipping is only $1.99 for the whole order. However if you can come up with a reason to spend more than $20 on your order shipping is free. They accept paypal, checks or money orders (you have to email them to find out how to pay with a check or money order).

    The system requirements listed by amazon are a bit sketchy. For Ubuntu 8.04 and Kubuntu 8.04 a minimum of 384 MB of RAM is required. For Xubuntu 8.04 a minimum of 256 MB of RAM is required. I have personally used Xubuntu 8.04 on 2 old computers one with a 766 MHz celeron processor and 256 MB of RAM and the other a 1.3 GHz celeron processor with 256 MB of RAM. Both have worked fine. I've used Ubuntu 8.04 and Kubuntu 8.04 on a 1.5 GHz celeron processor with 512 MB of RAM and both OS's worked great.

    Support for Ubuntu/Kubuntu/Xubuntu is second to none in my opinion. The forums at [....] are great. You have alot of people who are eager to help people make the transition from Windows to Linux. If you do decide to switch from Windows to a Linux OS you need to be aware that there is a learning curve and things may not go as smoothly as you may wish. But if you are fed up with Microsoft it's worth taking the time to learn.

    The main difference between Ubuntu, Kubuntu, and Xubuntu is the desktop environment. Which is essentially the way the computer looks and feels.

    Ubuntu uses the Gnome Desktop Environment
    Kubuntu uses the KDE Desktop Environment
    Xubuntu uses the Xfce Desktop Environment

    On some forums asking what is the best desktop environment will cause a flame war. The best way to find out which one you like is to try a few and pick which ever one you like. At the prices that frozentech charges that option isn't too expensive for most people.

    Edit: 11/19/08

    I looked back at my review and realized that amazon deleted my links to a few websites. I didn't realize that it was against amazon's review guidelines (my error). The first mention of [....] was to frozentech's website. And the second was to the ubuntu forums. I'll have to be more careful in future reviews. My apologies to amazon....more info
  • Ubuntu: Not Easy to Learn, but Well Worth the Effort!!
    First off don't get Ubuntu, load it onto your computer, and expect to be off and running right away. If you've spent years using Windows or Mac OSX, Ubuntu's learning curve is about as steep as it gets.

    Secondly, make one-to-one backups as often as possible of all your data.

    Lastly, Ubuntu is not Windows. I won't go into detail about it here. Do a Google search to find out more.

    After saying all this if you do decide to get Ubuntu and put the effort into learning how it works, and if you're like me, then you won't regret it. Even if you dual-boot with Windows, like I do, you will spend most of your time using Ubuntu. It is more secure, stable, and efficient than windows. It will use fewer resources on your computer but make better use of them.

    I've been back and forth a few times. Recently I switched back to using Vista for three months because I thought Vista must surely be fleshed out by now, and be at least as rock-solid as Ubuntu. I thought wrong. After just a few months Vista began to slow down. It seemed to be using more and more resources. And I just didn't find I was getting work done as easily as I did with Ubuntu.

    One very disconcerting thing that happened to me was when the Outlook trial I downloaded seemed to disappear, taking all my contacts, mail, and data with it. I never learned what was wrong with it. Good thing it was a trial and I made backups of everything.

    You don't have to be a geek to learn to use Ubuntu (although it helps). You do have to be patient and be willing to take on that learning curve. It's like learning a new language. And like anything in life, what you put into it will be what you get out of it.

    For me the rewards of having a reliable, stable, secure computer to store all my valuable data far outweighs the costs of spending the time to learn how to use it. And knowing that I'm no longer reliant on a corporation to be able to access and store my personal data gives me a feeling of security and self-reliance that you just can't put a price-tag on.

    ...more info