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Elizabeth: The Golden Age (Combo HD DVD and Standard DVD) [HD DVD]
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Product Description

Academy Award? winners Cate Blanchett and Geoffrey Rush join Academy Award? nominee Clive Owen in a gripping historical thriller full of suspense, intrigue and adventure!

When Queen Elizabeth's reign is threatened by ruthless familial betrayal and Spain's invading army, she and her shrewd advisor must act to safeguard to the lives of her people. But when a dashing seafarer, Walter Raleigh, captures her heart, she is forced to make her most tragic sacrifice for the good of her country.

Elizabeth: The Golden Age tells the thrilling tale of one woman's crusade to control her love, destroy her enemies and secure her position as a beloved icon of the western world.

In 1998's Elizabeth, Shekhar Kapur added a layer of suds to his history lesson; the director follows the same audience-pleasing recipe in Elizabeth: The Golden Age. Since the first film, Blanchett scored an Oscar for her note-perfect rendition of Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator, and she plays the preternaturally bemused monarch in a similar fashion. By 1585, Elizabeth I is an experienced ruler about to face two of her biggest challenges: betrayal by her Catholic cousin, Mary Stuart (Control's Samantha Morton), and invasion by the Spanish Armada. It isn't so much that the Protestant Elizabeth wishes to rid England of "papists," but that she wants her country to remain free from foreign domination. Closer to her home, she enjoys a sisterly relationship with lady-in-waiting Bess (rising Aussie star Abbie Cornish). That changes when Sir Walter Raleigh (a dashing Clive Owen) hits the scene. In order to continue exploring the New World, he seeks the queens sponsorship. She is charmed, but Raleigh only has eyes for Bess. As in the previous picture, Elizabeth enjoys better luck at affairs of state than affairs of the heart, but the conclusion is more beatific than before (and Kapur intends a third installment if Blanchett is willing). Elizabeth: The Golden Age is a rush of royal intrigue, bloody torture, fantastic headpieces, and irresistibly ripe dialogue, like "I have a hurricane in me that will strip Spain bare if you dare to try me!" To Kapur, victory for the Virgin Queen was a viable alternative to sex. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

Beyond Elizabeth C The Golden Age on DVD

More from Cate Blanchett

British Royalty on DVD

More Drama from Universal Studios

Stills from Elizabeth C The Golden Age (click for larger image)







Customer Reviews:

  • Command the Wind! Summon the Hurricane!
    Shekhar Kapur picks where he left off in telling the story of Elizabeth Tudor in 1998 by presenting his interpretation of the latter half of the Great Gloriana's reign in this 2007 sequel.
    It begins in 1585. Elizabeth has been England's ruler for over a quarter century, and is now 52.
    She deals with threats of invasion by Spanish King Phillip II(Jordi Molla), her ex-half-brother-in-law, and plots against her that are a little closer to home by Scottish Queen Mary Stuart(Samantha Morton), her Catholic cousin, whose legitimate claim to the English throne is supported by Spain and Rome, but who arguably overplays her hand in dealing with her cousin.
    Meeting with her council members, her chief advisor Francis Walsingham (Geoffrey Rush)advises her to monitor England's Catholic population more closely. While omitting her famous line, "I will not make a window on men's and women's souls", the Queen's(onscreen) actions reveal this. She vows to punish her people only based only on their deeds, not their beliefs (which in reality, didn't happen).
    The story omits the Queen's most trusted advisor, William Cecil, as well as Robert Dudley, Sir Robert Cecil, and Robert Devereaux, and focuses on her relationship with Sir Walter Raleigh (the ruggedly handsome Clive Owen, with radiant charisma, but looking as though he stepped from the canvas of an oil painting), who has just returned from the New World, having named the colony of Virginia in honor of the Virgin Queen, with the bounty of the New World, a few Native Americans, and pirated treasure from Spanish ships in tow.
    One has to overlook many historical inaccuracies to enjoy the performances of the beautifully intelligent Abbie Cornish as the Queen's ward, and most-favored lady-in waiting, Bess Throckmorton, Christian Brassington as the Archduke of Austria ( whose appearance recounts an episode of the storied Queen's life that took place earlier than the 1580s), David Threfall as Royal Astrologer, John Dee, whose prediction of a war between two Empires, and vaguary surrounding those details troubles Elizabeth, Eddie Redmayne, as Anthony Babington, the Jesuit's recruit to assassinate the English Queen, Rhys Ifans as co-conspirator and envoy to Spain, Robert Reston, and Adam Godley as Francis Walsingham's traitorous brother, William.
    We are led through sundry intrigues, and court rituals, as well as the Queen's dramatic response to a threat by a Spanish Ambassador in which she claims to have an internal "hurricane that can strip Spain bare", before we come to the high drama surrounding the trial and execution of Mary Stuart, an incident which causes Elizabeth much distress and may well have made her re-live the similar scenario involving her own mother, although she may have been too young to remember the latter.Tom Hollander's Sir Amyas Paulet, presides over the Scottish Queen's demise.
    Under the observant eye of his daughter, the Infanta Isabel (who was actually 21 in 1588, but here is portrayed by child actress Aimee King, decked out like a 16th century Wednesday Addams),a vengeful King Phillip, who supported Mary Stuart, declares Holy War on England.Elizabeth has to forgive Raleigh's seduction of Bess to appoint him as captain of her naval forces.
    The climax of the film is the dramatic confrontation of the Spanish Armada, where Henry VIII's once unwelcome daughter presides over an astonishing victory. The cinematography of this scene is particularly bold.
    Dealing with life and death matters among her closest subjects shortly thereafter, she settles into her role as mother of her people, and helps England close the 16th century on a golden note.
    The acting and the costumes are superb, and I have often felt the best historical dramas are ones that resemble moving oil paintings of the time they depict on canvas. Director Kapur succeeds in creating that effect here.
    ...more info
  • Wrong Region
    My DVD player is set for Korea. It won't play the DVD, it says "check the region".

    COuld I return it? But I really want this product - how can I get one for the right region?

    Thank you...more info
  • The best Elizabeth ever made!!!
    I have been astonished by few movies in my short life of 36 years, but this movie exceeded my expectations of drama and virtual reality by bringing the spectator to the middle of the story . Will always remember this one. Anna...more info
  • much underrated
    This sequel to Elizabeth is perhaps the most underrated film of 2007. Visually it is gorgeous and for the most part maintains the high standards set by the original. Here and there it slides a wee bit into the realm of soap opera, but that is more than made up for by its better merits. I am giving The Golden Age 5 stars for the best camera work of '07 and for having been overshadowed by lesser offerings... like Atonement for example. :)...more info
  • Cate Blanchett is the definitive Elizabeth, and she proved it in the first film...
    "Elizabeth," the first film, was about a young woman coming to the throne in a period of great turmoil, and how she dealt with that... It was love in the context of power, betrayal, and survival...

    In "Elizabeth: The Golden Age," we're dealing with the most famous aspects of her regime, the Spanish Armada, the Babington Plot, which was a major plot against her, and Walter Raleigh bringing back the very early understanding of the New World, and the horizons beyond Britain... It is the exploration of unrestricted power...

    Elizabeth, as cultured and as intelligent and eloquent as she was, had never left the shores of England... And into her court, strides an explorer who has literally been where the maps end... The gallant Raleigh (Clive Owen) was a free spirit who thrills the queen with his tales and discoveries at sea ... The classic 16th-century adventurer who doesn't play by any official rules, and he does bring into the world of the court something very alluring, enigmatic and charismatic, which has a big impact on the queen...

    The relationship between Raleigh and Elizabeth was very complicated... There were things holding Elizabeth back... "We mortals have many weaknesses; we feel too much, hurt too much or too soon we die, but we do have the chance of love." These words were spoken by Sir Walter Raleigh to the Virgin Quenn...It's very rare that the Queen takes interest in a man, and she does...

    At this special point, England was very weak militarily... Elizabeth had discharged the navy... And once again it was the old problem of religious instability, which harasses the human race frequently...

    Anybody that's interested in this period of history will find it fascinating just how capable Elizabeth was in regards to how she dealt with the captive Queen of Scots...

    Mary Stuart (Samantha Morton) had great respect for the Protestant Elizabeth, and was remarkably intrigued by her, and desperate to meet her, and fascinated... For several years Elizabeth suffered about her execution because she really believed two things... She believed that any queen was divine... She accepted as true that her Catholic cousin was there by the will of God, and therefore, Mary was there by the will of God... And in executing Mary, she would disintegrate her one belief that she herself was divine...

    Mary found it in death... Elizabeth had to find it in life... So if you look at the Armada, Elizabeth finally does become divine, and that's why we had to admire how the scene of the Armada is shot, by Shekhar Kapur, in that way... It's not actually a fiery sea battle between two countries... It's a 'Holy War' with Spain... Therefore, the defining moments of the Armada is when Elizabeth walks up across the verdant cliffs in flowing white nightgown... She's no longer the Avenging Queen... She's instead a supernatural being, a disembodied soul defeating the enemy, dominating the fearless of the waves, the force of the storm, and the strength of fire...

    Dripping with intrigues, plots, battles, mysteries, and strong emotions, the film captured the ecclesiastical spaces of the cathedrals to look more like a palace environment... It also captured the feel of the16th century architecture, linking and matching it to the proper locations... ...more info
  • Childish, and peppered with thinly-veiled racism...
    To begin with, Kate Blanchett is good, no matter what you put her in. But then there is the matter of the director, Shekhar Kapur. This Pakistani born, managed to paint Spaniards in a cartoonish depiction, whereby their walk and mannerisms are equated to The Planet of the Apes. They used several actors who don't even look like Spaniards, and who can't even speak the language! The accents are completely ridiculous. As is typical of right-wing financed films, they got a director of color to push their agenda. It is expected of Hollywood to rewrite history, and paint Spaniards as animals, but this one goes over the top, to the point that it is obvious and laughable. YOU BE THE JUDGE. It is understandable that it must be central to the film to portray Protestantism as "the light" and Catholicism as brutal dogmatism, if you are to paint Elizabeth as the hero that she was. But there are ways of doing it tastefully and with historical accuracy, none of which are present in this film. It is obvious that it isn't for a mature, educated audience, but rather one more of the new wave of light and fluffy period films for a new breed of morons who know nothing about history, and who are easily manipulated and polarized by the new wave of hatred-filled propaganda in the U.S. and England. In a sense, the Neo-Conservatives behind this film, in an attempt to discredit Spaniards, actually made a portrayal of themselves, because THEY are the anachronistic imbeciles that humanity is desperately trying to get rid of. How's THAT for irony?...more info
  • Nice to look at, boring to sit through
    The costumes and props in this movie were incredible. I enjoyed the first Elizabeth movie, so I thought I'd enjoy the sequel. And it starts off promising - but it quickly became tedious and boring. I'm a history buff, I love history movies. But I did not love this one. It had a good amount of historical inaccuracies, and the script was plodding. I let out a sigh of relief when it was over....more info
  • Enjoyable but Historically Inaccurate
    Needless to say the performaces, the set designs and script are maginficent...but it was not Walter Raleigh but Sir Francis Drake (who is not even mentioned) who was the main hero in the defeat of the Spanish Armada...However the film is totally enjoyable and the historical shots are awe inspiring....
    ...more info
  • Stunning beauty in filmmaking!
    If you love period epics, fantastic costumes, and each frame a visual beauty. Oh yes, and a really good story pulled from history. Than you will enjoy this film! The acting is top drawer, Kate is fantastic as as this amazing woman who was Queen Elizabeth! Enjoy!
    (My only regret is they have not, released this on Blu-Ray!) ...more info
  • Elizabeth: The Golden Age
    The best of the two Cate Blanchett portrails of Elizabeth I. This one had move of a decent storyline and dramtics than the other. This is pretty much what I was taught at Oxford University during a course on Tudor History.

    I recommend this picture for anyone interested in Elizabeth and the Tudor era....more info
  • Not a disaster but less than commanding
    At once more ambitious and less intriguing than its predecessor, Elizabeth: The Golden Age certainly isn't the abject disaster reviewers claimed on its theatrical release, although it's not nearly as engrossing as the original. Unfortunately, while Shekhar Kapur opens up the action and opts for a much lighter palate this time round, with at least a trailer's worth of striking visuals, the results are not particularly compelling. By focusing on the best-known part of the Virgin Queen's reign there's less of the constant sense of danger that marked its predecessor even though it amps up the threat by pitting her not against her own court but the might of the Spanish Empire and its Armada. Yet, being a sequel, it adheres to the `the same but different,' and there's certainly a strong element of dj vu: the dastardly Catholics are still plotting her death, with Rhys Ifans and Samantha Morton taking on the Daniel Craig and Fanny Ardant roles of Jesuit hitman and conspiring Scottish queen. And, as before, history isn't well served, with the film offering the notion that Philip of Spain conspired to force Elizabeth to execute Mary Queen of Scots to give him an excuse for a holy war.

    The script certainly could have been better, running down rather than gaining momentum as the Armada approaches and dropping the ball in many of the obvious slamdunks. Certainly if you're going to omit Elizabeth's famous "I may have the body of a weak and foolish woman, but I have the heart of a king" you need to come up with something with more guts and bravado than the tired horseback speech she gives to rally her troops. Even worse, the Armada itself is something of an anti-climax. The almost painting-like CGi effects aren't as much a problem in a film as occasionally stylised as this as are the all-too obvious budget limitations that reduce it to the odd running commentary that makes it somewhat akin to listening to a football game on the radio.

    Performances are highly variable. Blanchett is suitably regal in the lead, with Geoffrey Rush and David Threlfall fare best among the courtiers, but Abbie Cornish makes little impression, Rhys Ifans just seems to be going through the motions and Samantha Morton is fairly awful as Mary. Both bland and risibly hammy at the same time, with her risibly overemphatic delivery she feels like a smug prefect in a school play playing up to the gallery rather than a credible conspiring monarch, giving easily the worst performance in the film even after the worst of her performance hit the cutting room floor. Yet the biggest surprise in the film is Clive Owen's Walter Raleigh.

    If at first it seems disastrous casting the zombie-like Owen as the representation of the life and love Elizabeth can never have, but, amazingly, for once he almost rises to the occasion. Like many a bad actor he's utterly hopeless in the moments that aren't about him, looking bored when he's supposed to be listening, displaying complete disinterest in his scenes with Abbie Cornish and sleepwalking through the battle with the Armada, but for once he handles his monologues - the best writing in the film - surprisingly well, even changing his expression a few times, though quite why he chooses to play his early scenes with a bad American accent remains a mystery. It's not a perfect performance (the deleted scenes on the DVD show that his flat delivery and lack of timing botched a gift of a scene with Rush), but for the first time there are signs that if he was willing to really put in the work and had a director who wouldn't mistake talking in a bored Coventry accent for a performance he could be a capable jobbing supporting actor.

    The 1.85:1 widescreen transfer is a bit disappointingly short on detail in some scenes, though there are a decent set of extras.
    ...more info
  • Loved it!
    This is a fabulous movie! I don't care how historically inaccurate it is; I didn't watch it to learn history! I watched it to be entertained, and it did just that. It was as good as the first Elizabeth movie, and it makes me want to look for the next installment of Elizabeth. Because of these movies, I thinks she's my favorite queen....more info
  • Elizabeth is Golden!!!
    This is very well done there are some great reviews on here but I do have one complaint and there is something Historically In-accurant and that is Elizabeth was a Protestant and did not seek Oricals and seek the stars for direction, she prayed to God, other than that the movie was very well done.

    Enjoy the first one and this second one WONDEFUL!!...more info
  • Beautiful Portrayal of Elizabeth I
    Picking up shortly after Elizabeth I left off the movie portrays the complicated life of one of England's greatest Monarchs. Elizabeth The Golden Age, shows us the balance which was required of Elizabeth, balancing the incredible tenacity and guts it took to rule England and her fears and longings for real love and security.

    Elizabeth's life is a story of overcoming the odds. Born second child of Henry VIII and his second wife Anne Boleyn, she was supposed the be the long awaited and promised son of the King, yet Henry's wishes for a son were dashed upon her birth. In the first movie we see the growth of her strength which Elizabeth must muster to survive, and in The Golden Age we see the strength come into full bloom, the strength she will need to overcome the looming Spanish evasion and the always present question of marriage and producing a male heir.

    Europe has become divided by Protestant and Catholic, and Elizabeth's own country and family has fallen along divided lines as well. Queen Mary of Scotland sits to the north imprisoned by Elizabeth, but Mary possesses something that Elizabeth does not have, the backing of Catholic Spain and France. For Elizabeth it is only a matter of time until she will be called upon to do something about the looming threat of Mary. When that time comes we find Elizabeth torn between what must be done to a trader and the rights of a sovereign Queen like herself.

    It is this decision which leads to the climax of the movie. Mary is favored by Spain and with the outcome of Mary's fate, Spain steps into action to crush the Protestant [...] Elizabeth. Elizabeth faced with an impeding invasion of the Spanish steps forward to encourage her countrymen in the battle and protect her beloved England.

    However The Golden Age is not solely about the battles between countries but the battles of the heart. Elizabeth although known as the Virgin Queen is not without the need of love and passion. Yet Elizabeth knows that this could pose as big a threat to her and her country as the Spanish and French.

    This film is truly a feast for the eyes - incredible costumes and sets are only the beginning. I would recommend that one watch The Golden Age after first viewing Elizabeth I. It will assist in knowing where Elizabeth has been and the amount of growth in Elizabeth is amazing to watch. ...more info
  • A Worthy Sequel For a Queen
    Others have covered the details sufficiently, so I will stick to a simple review. This sequel was one of those rare films that was as good as the original in every aspect. When a sequel is this good, it doesn't have to rehash the first film, it can just get on with the story telling. Fine work, a worthy watch, enjoy!...more info
  • Elizabeth-the Golden Age?
    I looked forward to seeing this sequel to the 1998 release but somehow despite the great production values and Cate Blanchett's great performance in the lead role, I was disappointed. Most of the problem concerns the script which seems to lack focus. First we are treated to Elizabeth's problems with Mary Stuart, then her relationshop with Walter Raleigh (an excellent Clive Owen) and then the struggle with Prince Phillip of Spain to maintain diplomacy which culminates in war. In comparison to the original, there was a distinct point of view but in this sequel, everything is scattered with a lack of focus. The 3 stars I give this to are the superb HD DVD transfer, Blanchette's performance and of course the battle scenes. This is disc you would need to show off the virtues of HI-DEF!! If you like this type of history, do check it out but there are better films on this subject such as "Elizabeth and Essex" and "The Virgin Queen". ...more info
  • A superb sequel to the masterful Elizabeth!
    I was deliriously happy to see that this sequel to Elizabeth was in production and waited most impatiently for its release. We bought both segments in the glorious HD format and were delighted by the quality and depth of color and detail.

    The Golden Age does not disappoint as so many sequels do and it most definitely lives up to the integrity of the first movie....more info
  • Golden Age, Bronze Movie
    "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" is a continuation of the life and loves of Queen Elizabeth I of England as portrayed by Cate Blanchett and directed by Shekhar Kapur. The first "Elizabeth" was a perfectly watchable costume drama, but never quite made it to excellence. The sequel leaves more to be desired.

    Familiar themes from the first movie remain a source of contention for Elizabeth. Religious strife threatens to rip the country in half and Europe teeters on war. Elizabeth, despite the advice of spymaster Sir Walshingham (once again played by the great Geoffrey Rush) takes a restrained approach to dealing with the English Catholics. Less restrained is she in the affairs of the heart when the dashing Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen) returns from plundering the Spanish. Plunder is a dish best served with potatoes. (Just watch it ...)

    Of course, when devout religious believers, politics, and a megalomaniac monarch meet, things get a little dicey. King Philip of Spain, under the pretext of avenging the execution of Mary Stuart (history is a little distorted here) launches his massive Armada to England, but is defeated by a storm.

    The film lacks the emotional depth and lacks pathos for the character. Also, the defeat of the Armada completely lacks any sense of urgency or desperation that the English must have felt.

    It may have been Elizabeth's Golden Age, but it only wins a bronze medal....more info
  • Same director? Really?
    I adored the first Elizabeth. It was perfect in it's script and flawless in it's acting. After watching The Golden Age however, I was utterly distraught. I cannot believe that this is made by the same man who directed the first film. It just doesn't seem possible.
    Everything from the script, to the editing to the actors that don't belong, it just doesn't work or flow. If there is one redeaming aspect of this film, it is the once again brilliant performance by Cate Blanchette. She can do no wrong. She is one of the most skilled actresses out there, anywhere. However, my gripe is actually with her character. She doesn't even seem to be the same Queen from the first Elizabeth. Granted, years have passed, but this Elizabeth comes off as weak and undecided, jittery even. It doesn't feel right. Abbie Cornish also feels very wrong as the Queen's favorite lady-in-waiting. She is very out of place, no matter the beautiful costume she is wearing.

    Samantha Morton as Mary Stewart is UTTERLY wasted. They could have just cast some unknown, so small and barely noticable a part she played. One of my favorite actors, Geoffry Rush was shamefully placed in the background and barely had anything to do with this film. His character was a favorite of mine in the first film.
    Clive Owen is pointless in this. His character feels neither here nor there. Wrong choice in actors, I guess.

    The plot was also confusing, it jumped around way too much and you never really know how much time has passed. There is no mystery or intrigue. Nothing to captivate. The final and supposedly huge battle is a few boring minutes long and feels almost out of place.

    The costumes and wigs are magnificent, as in the first film. Again, one of the only bright spots.

    This is an extrememly dissapointing film that probably should not have been made. It seems very unnecessary. This is definitely one of the instances where a sequel is so much worse than the original. ...more info
  • The epic of power!
    Elizabeth The Virgin Queen, who bet her own happiness in pursuit of her people, and knew to move the pieces of her Army and navy with notable intelligence is carved in relief once more in this mesmerizing film who allows us once more to admire Cate Blanchet one of the top ten actress all over the world, in this gripping and colossal movie, told with impeccable sobriety thanks to a dynamic and fluid script.

    With monumental stages and unforgettable landscapes, the film is not only a fest for your eyes but also an important reflection about political leadership in those hard times She was the decisive turning point who conveyed England to become the next Empire of the Western world, after the fall of Spain.

    Recommended without reserves.
    ...more info
  • Fabulous Costumes
    I anticipated the arrival of this DVD very much after I ordered it.
    Historically correct, with a few tweaks, this film gives a very insightful view of England's "virgin Queen".
    The film only captures a very short amount of the life of Elizabeth, and provides a very dry love story, but I must say that the costumes and make up in this movie are fabulous, fabulous.
    All in all, it was very entertaining, I'm proud to own the DVD, but I will probably only pull it out about once a year or so.
    ...more info
  • Superb Acting but Little Historical Accuracy.
    The acting, costumes, and set designs are exquisite in this move. If you are not a history buff and are just looking for a drama full of superb acting (especially CB as Elizabeth) and supreme coustumes, then you will enjoy this movie. For those that pick apart historical dramas for accuaracy, many of the "liberties" taken in this movie may bother you. Like with many historical dramas, ages and events are not aligned with when they happened in real life. For those who are watching for more than mere entertainment purposes, this movie may not live up to your standards....more info
  • Que lastima!! Suffers from hollywood excesses - 2.5/5
    This is indeed a very colorful production and the acting is all pretty good, especially Kate Blanchette.
    However it has two main problems
    -- First there is the mis-blending of plots and episodes in the movie: Elizabeth's affairs at court with Sir Walter Raleigh shares about the same screen time as does the war with the spanish. But neither get dealt with properly or fully - they get dabbled in ... pity.
    I am not sure how accurate the movie is. I honestly don't know but as a general history lesson it brings up interesting stuff about the religious background to spain etc. If it is correct in it's depictions then as a believer in secularism I am glad the spanish armada did not succeed againt England. The church has a lot to answer for in history no doubt. I say that tough I now live in Spain myself and love it to bits.
    -- The second problem is the presence of Hollywood - the over-iconiation of Elizabeth is a pain amidst all the continuous background synthesized wall-to-wall dribble music. When will these producers ever learn? With all the classical music available not to mention endless abstract pieces that could have been used, I cannot understand the dullness of mind which the director is guilty of here. This is why this movie will always be a "B" flick. What a pity! A bit of simple taste and it might have been a classic. Certainly the stunning visual settings and costumes were all up to it.
    I wish Hollywood would learn. Maybe take a page from A Man for all Seasons - pace things on the screen a little bit more rather than bombarding the viewer with this overproduction. Modern technology is great but we need to know when not to apply it.
    Especially having spend all the time and money.
    Let me give one small example of what I mean: There is a scene at a late stage of the file where the camera rotates a few times round a beautifully crafted doll/statuette of the queen(Kate Blanchette). Really marvelous idea but not at this stage of the story and for so long with all the meaningless background music raging. The film at this stage was boring and the scene served only to irritate this viewer - I just wanted it to end. Why not have this maybe in the opening scene and without the sound assault?!
    The mark of a great film is wanting to watch it again at every excuse. Not this one
    Que lastima!...more info
  • A Triumph of Film-Craft!
    Far superior to the earlier film by the same name; plot lines are tighter, costuming is eye-popping, and the tension between Blanchett's Elizabeth and Clive Owen's Raleigh is palpable. Historical inaccuracies aside, a great film!...more info
  • This is a MUST see
    Okay, so I'm a little impartial; I'm a huge Cate Blanchett fan and also love historical movies. That being said I think this is a great movie, and even better than the first. There has been a lot of criticism that the film is not historically accurate, and while that may be true, it is called historical fiction for a reason; if you're looking for a documentary on Elizabeth I, I would recommend Elizabeth: The Acclaimed Saga of England's Virgin Queen produced by the History Channel. Some people have said this movie is only good for eye candy and that the plot is incidental and weak, that it isn't complex or motivate the viewer to think. While I don't necessarily disagree with this opinion, I would argue that there are at least two types of cinematic styles that can make a film extraordinary. The first is the intellectual type that requires abstract thinking, attention to detail and a good memory, the type of film that when all the pieces fall into place it seems almost like an epiphany. The second type of extraordinary film is one that is poignant, sensuous, ecstatogenic and fills one with exaltation. Elizabeth - The Golden Age is the latter type of film. It truly is sublime in the Romantic sense; attempting to analyze, interpret, and dissect this film will all cause you to miss the point! One can only appreciate the sublime when one ceases to try to comprehend, label, and order it; you can only stand in awe of it and allow it to overwhelm you. This is not to say that one type of film is better than the other, simply that they cannot be appreciated in the same manner. Think of the joy the first time you solved a complex equation or suddenly grasped a complex scientific theory; this is analogous to appreciation of a highly complex detail oriented film. Now think of the first time you heard Beethoven's "Ode to Joy"; you certainly wouldn't have been able to appreciate it if you had approached it in the same analytical fashion as say, the Golden Ratio. So, try to approach this film on its own terms, and you won't be disappointed. ...more info
  • Que lastima!! Suffers from hollywood excesses - 2.5/5
    This is indeed a very colorful production and the acting is all pretty good, especially Kate Blanchette.
    However it has two main problems
    -- First there is the mis-blending of plots and episodes in the movie: Elizabeth's affairs at court with Sir Walter Raleigh shares about the same screen time as does the war with the spanish. But neither get dealt with properly or fully - they get dabbled in ... pity.
    I am not sure how accurate the movie is. I honestly don't know but as a general history lesson it brings up interesting stuff about the religious background to spain etc. If it is correct in it's depictions then as a believer in secularism I am glad the spanish armada did not succeed againt England. The church has a lot to answer for in history no doubt. I say that tough I now live in Spain myself and love it to bits.
    -- The second problem is the presence of Hollywood - the over-iconiation of Elizabeth is a pain amidst all the continuous background synthesized wall-to-wall dribble music. When will these producers ever learn? With all the classical music available not to mention endless abstract pieces that could have been used, I cannot understand the dullness of mind which the director is guilty of here. This is why this movie will always be a "B" flick. What a pity! A bit of simple taste and it might have been a classic. Certainly the stunning visual settings and costumes were all up to it.
    I wish Hollywood would learn. Maybe take a page from A Man for all Seasons - pace things on the screen a little bit more rather than bombarding the viewer with this overproduction. Modern technology is great but we need to know when not to apply it.
    Especially having spend all the time and money.
    Let me give one small example of what I mean: There is a scene at a late stage of the file where the camera rotates a few times round a beautifully crafted doll/statuette of the queen(Kate Blanchette). Really marvelous idea but not at this stage of the story and for so long with all the meaningless background music raging. The film at this stage was boring and the scene served only to irritate this viewer - I just wanted it to end. Why not have this maybe in the opening scene and without the sound assault?!
    The mark of a great film is wanting to watch it again at every excuse. Not this one
    Que lastima!...more info
  • Last part of the Queen Elizabeth I trilogy
    Long anticipated part three of the Queeen Elizabeth trilogy is finally out there with beautiful Kate Blanchett in the lead role. Film focuses on the time in British history when Spain, the most powerful country in Europe, attempts to invade Britain in the name of the Catholic faith. The premise film makes is that Spanish are using Mary, Queen of Scotland, as a bait for Elizabeth to give Spain a reason for invasion. Important favorite at that time of Elizabeth's reign is Sir Walter Raleigh, who ends up marrying her favorite lady-in-waiting Bess. Film attempts to cover many aspects of that time: clash between catholic and protestant faith, conflict between liberty and inquisition, Elizabeth's internal struggle between her duty as a queen to her country and her own need for love and loyalty of the man. One constant about all films about this fascinating queen is that she was strong, wise and dedicated ot her service toher people. Her sense of duty and leadership overrode principal requirement of the time - to marry another prince and create political alliance with another strong European royal powerhouse. She has managed to deliver prosperity to England and help protestanism establish its roots there. She has redefined history as a woman, ruler and a political figure of her time who was able to control church, her court and her royal subjects with her wit alone. However, the full acting credit in this film should go to Samantha Morton in her role of Queen Mary. Ms. Morton has delivered wonderful depiction of the queen who dies for her faith and her belief of what is righteous life and reign ought to be....more info
  • Ok movie
    Cate Blanchett does an outstanding performance in this second of thia two movies abouth Elisabeth II. But I have to say, it is a litle boring... Hd dvd quality is good, both picture and sound....more info
  • Magnifficent visual feast
    An immaculate and glorious visual feast, featuring Elizabeth I's inspired leadership of England, during the 1580s.
    The basic threads involve her enlightened rule and refusal, of the advice, by her council to persecute her Catholic subjects, the imprisonment of Mary, Queen of Scots (Samantha Morton) and the Babbington Plot leading to Elizabeth being forced by her council especially Francis Walsingham (Geoffrey Rush), the relationship of Elizabeth (Cate Blanchett) with Sir Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen) and his love of Elizabeth's beautiful lady in waiting, Bess Throckmorton, played charmingly by the exquisite ( Abbie Cornish), and of course Elizabeth's rallying of England against the Spanish armada which threatened to invade and conquer England and bring with it all the horrors of the inquisition.
    It also briefly features Elizabeth's consultation with the astrologer and psychic John Dee (David Threlfall).
    Most inspiring is Elizabeth's leadership in resisting the Spanish invasion and her rousing speech to the assembled English troops (although not including her famous word about having the feeble body of a woman but the heart of a king): "My loving people. We see the sails of the enemy approaching. We hear the Spanish guns over the water. Soon now, we will meet them face-to-face. I am resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all. While we stand together no invader shall pass. Let them come with the armies of Hell; they will not pass! And when this day of battle is ended, we meet again in heaven or on the field of victory".
    While there is much that is not historically accurate, this is high drama at it's remarkable best, never falters in it's pace or it's majesty, and capture both the greatness and capriciousness of Queen Elizabeth I.
    It is inspiring and exciting to see how she leads her nation in struggling against the darkness that would be imposed by the Spanish Conquest of England, with an imposed inquisition.
    A struggle of a free land against the darkness of backward religious intolerance and destruction.
    This period peace should inspire people to read up more on Queen Elizabeth and 16th century Britain. ...more info
  • Well done Cate!
    There have been so many versions of Queen Elizabeth's life, but I believe this one will stand out. I loved Clive Owen as Sir Walter Raleigh, and of course Cate was superb. A young queen is torn between her country and allowing herself to fall in love or be loved. Focusing on her country at a time when her throne and people need her undivided attention is an intense, bittersweet glance into another Era. When Elizabeth is tricked into allowing her cousin, Mary, Queen of Scotland, to be sentenced to death and beheaded, Elizabeth's spirit and ability to face and fight the mighty Armada of Spain are fully tested.

    Chrissy K. McVay - Author...more info
  • A Triumph of Film-Craft!
    Far superior to the earlier film by the same name; plot lines are tighter, costuming is eye-popping, and the tension between Blanchett's Elizabeth and Clive Owen's Raleigh is palpable. Historical inaccuracies aside, a great film!...more info
  • cate is endlessly fascinating--as an actress
    to me, cate blanchett is one of ten english-speaking actresses that could croak the abcs and i would buy a ticket for it. so, i didn't find my way to 'elizabeth: the golden age' for a history lesson. likewise, i'm not an anglophile and have some feeling that the english have done some really funky things in the name of their queen. but that aside, i have nothing but admiration for blanchett's second take on the virgin queen under kapur's fanciful direction.

    blanchett and kapur made their chapters in the queen's life a romantic, lush film with hints of political intrigue accompanied by stunning visual and design effects (the watching eyes of the ladies in waiting as elizabeth and sir dudley make love turning in to prints of eyes on her drapes is still so wist ful and enchanting). kapur was also able to give screen time to more than a few actors like daniel craig. craig is now the british flavor du jour. not to mention kelly macdonald and emily mortimer as two of elizabeth's ladies in waiting and the wonderful kathy burke as queen mary.

    now the visuals are just as stunning--and from what i gather as anachronistic--as before. alexandra byrne's costumes are even more sumptuous than before and very worthy of their academy award. and geoffrey rush is on hand again as elizabeth's advisor and he is even more authoritative.

    and as for cate--she is just as magnificent as she was before. now she is power incarnate as she presses through the cavernous sets in her array of silks and brocades. and she has more than a few moments of vulnerability as she watches her favorite lady bess dance with her favorite lord, sir walter raleigh and relives when she was younger. her last night talks with her lady bess are also warm and filled with many depths.

    now i wish that the score could have been a little more right and less a wash of strings and whatnot that make up the standard historical epic score. and even though it may or may not be a huge part of british history, i would like to have seen more of samantha morton. after all, she is a very good actor and mary, queen of scots is a very good role.

    it would have been too much to expect blanchett to take many (if any) awards for this performance but the work still stands strong--even if it's not buoyed up by statuettes....more info