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Wall Street (20th Anniversary Edition)
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Product Description

Studio: Tcfhe Release Date: 09/18/2007 Run time: 125 minutes Rating: R

Michael Douglas won an Oscar for perfectly embodying the Reagan-era credo that "greed is good." As a Donald Trump-like Wall Street raider aptly named Gordon Gecko (for his reptilian ability to attack corporate targets and swallow them whole), Douglas found a role tailor-made to his skill in portraying heartless men who've sacrificed humanity to power. He's a slick, seductive role model for the young ambitious Wall Street broker played by Charlie Sheen, who falls into Gecko's sphere of influence and instantly succumbs to the allure of risky deals and generous payoffs. With such perks as a high-rise apartment and women who love men for their money, Charlie's like a worm on Gecko's hook, blind to the corporate maneuvering that puts him at odds with his own father (played by Sheen's offscreen father, Martin). With his usual lack of subtlety, writer-director Oliver Stone drew from the brokering experience of his own father to tell this Faustian tale for the "me" decade, but the movie's sledgehammer style is undeniably effective. A cautionary warning that Stone delivers on highly entertaining terms, Wall Street grabs your attention while questioning the corrupted values of a system that worships profit at the cost of one's soul. --Jeff Shannon

Michael Douglas won an Oscar for perfectly embodying the Reagan-era credo that "greed is good." As a Donald Trump-like Wall Street raider aptly named Gordon Gecko (for his reptilian ability to attack corporate targets and swallow them whole), Douglas found a role tailor-made to his skill in portraying heartless men who've sacrificed humanity to power. He's a slick, seductive role model for the young ambitious Wall Street broker played by Charlie Sheen, who falls into Gecko's sphere of influence and instantly succumbs to the allure of risky deals and generous payoffs. With such perks as a high-rise apartment and women who love men for their money, Charlie's like a worm on Gecko's hook, blind to the corporate maneuvering that puts him at odds with his own father (played by Sheen's offscreen father, Martin). With his usual lack of subtlety, writer-director Oliver Stone drew from the brokering experience of his own father to tell this Faustian tale for the "me" decade, but the movie's sledgehammer style is undeniably effective. A cautionary warning that Stone delivers on highly entertaining terms, Wall Street grabs your attention while questioning the corrupted values of a system that worships profit at the cost of one's soul. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews:

  • Boring, confusing, lacking in character depth...
    I didn't like this movie. It was VERY dull and confusing, and it was nearly impossible to relate to, sympathize with or understand any of the characters. The acting was pretty good, but overall I just couldn't wait for the movie to be over!...more info
  • The higher the building the higher the pile of ...
    The film avoids as much as possible the sentimental side of things and concentrates on the financial depth of the business. There is a slight touch of romanticism with the cover-girl, sorry home decorator. There is a little bit more feeling with the father, maybe because the father is playing the father and the son is playing the son, though it remains essentially business, in this case union business. Then there is nothing but buying and selling, owning and dumping, saving and killing, and the game is only pleasant if it is always both together. To kill one by saving another and to buy one in order to make the other sell and then buy him out. Even the police and justice are used that way. I expose you to the police to humiliate you and have you arrested, but then you trap me for the police with a tape-recorder and you will get a rap on the fingers from the judge while I will get to prison. When you know that that I was the one who wanted to kill a certain company that that you decided to save by having it bought by the sworn enemy of that I, you understand what inside business and inside dealing and inside embezzling and inside anything you want means. Just read or watch American Psycho, Unrated Version, and you will have the schizophrenic reading of the same situation. This film is maybe slightly too technical, but it is the way we are totally messed up in our lives by a bunch of psychopaths who have enough money to buy the federal government out of the federal reserve at Fort Knox, or vice versa, which might even be funnier. As Gekko said so simply: "You're not naive enough to think we are in a democracy. It's the free market." And we are the bait to catch the fish or the fish caught by the hook, or even maybe nothing but the hook itself to catch the shark.

    Dr Jacques COULARDEAU, University Paris Dauphine & University Paris 1 Pantheon Sorbonne
    ...more info
  • I LOVED YOU IN WALLSTREET!!
    What a great line from Hot Shots 2!! This movie was great. Sheen gets thrown in the slammer, and Douglass acts like a big shot the whole movie. Ten piece suits and a lot of other stuff. Sheen probably became a garbage man like in the movie, "Men At Work" after being released from prison. ...more info
  • Always Entertaining
    Good actors and directing. Stone as usual throws in his idealogical slant and has Martin Sheen in the cast to give us the solid socialist perspective. But I think Gordon Gekko though flawed (obviously since he was created by Stone), delivers the right message that without capitalism and the pursuit of profits we as a society would be stagnant and doomed. Sorry Oliver your Friend Castro got it all wrong. From an artistic point of view a good solid movie. ...more info
  • Zeitgeist on Film
    Let's start with 2 definitions:

    A. Economics as the rigorous analysis of incentive and utility in any social institution.
    B. Game Theory as the calculus of conflict and cooperation between 2 or more parties.

    Now let us take these precepts as the backdrop of a canonical film that scrutinizes the Reaganomics-fueled roaring 80s and corporate transgression and you get something called "Wall Street," an incredible epic that works because its creator knows that business is ultimately a long game of chess....more info
  • The Disease of Accumulation
    WALL STREET is Stone's best film. Better than PLATOON. Better than JFK. Better than NATURAL BORN KILLERS. I can't believe how little praise it gets.

    WALL STREET is more than just an indictment of the 80's. It's a treatise on wealth and how quickly it makes you rationalize behavior you didn't think you were capable of. Obviously, this is a relevant lesson in any era.

    Plenty of other film have attempted to preach this same message. Most of them have failed. And even the good ones don't contain anything that can compare to the scene where Sheen gets busted. Or Gordon's famous "Greed is good" speech (sounds a lot like what we're hearing about globalization, doesn't it?).

    Anyway, WALL STREET is a film that muckrakes as it entertains. How many movies can you say that about?...more info

  • Swimming with Sharks
    A good look into the Jungle of Big Business, the Corruption of Power, Personal Growth, and morality. ...more info
  • "Forced" to opine.
    I was pleasantly surprised to find the movie as current and as interesting as it was when it first came out. A brilliant director and talented actors contributed, but the most
    important was, and is, the script, still fresh and very much to the point. One does not quote any more "Greed is Good" because it is politically incorrect. But, believe it, it still rules Wall Street and the corporate world. The latest news about the selling of America proves it. I can recommend this DVD without any qualms.
    ...more info
  • Arguably Oliver Stone's best film
    Wall Street is the story of young, naive stockbroker Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen) who is too impatient to go through the right channels to success and instead lets him impatience get him in trouble. Sick of cold calling, Bud Fox goes straight for the big fish... in this case, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) an entrepreuneur who is often written about in Fortune magazine, aka the Bible. When Bud gets involved with Gordon, before he knows it he's losing all his inhibitions, caring nothing about the consequences of his actions, and is involved in an insider trading scam that threatens to ruin his family.

    Wall Street is arguably Oliver Stone's best film, and has the solid acting, stellar film quality, and impressive use of light and sound to earn itself the title. It's even more relevant in the insider trading obsessed climate of the early 21st century, and I think its tale of backstabbing and betrayal will--sadly--always have a place in modern society. Charlie Sheen shines as a naive, impatient young buck who refuses to take the necessary time to achieve success on his own and instead is willing to cut any corners on the path to fame and fortune. Michael Douglas plays the villain perfectly, without remorse and with no qualms about who gets crushed in the process. For anyone who enjoys Oliver Stone films or impressive drama with a solid cast, I'd recommend Wall Street....more info
  • How Much is Enough?
    It seems to me there's a certain type of photographic quality in most of the 80s movies that sets them apart from any other era. I'm not arguing it's either better or worse than others, it just feels different and very distinctive. In this light, "Wall Street" reminded me vividly of "No Way Out" for instance - which happens to be from 1987 as well - and several De Palma films. Don't ask me why. It just does.

    Useless considerations apart, "Wall Street", directed by always controversial Oliver Stone, pictures the almighty frenzy in corridors of high finance where no one has a chance to fade away. They always burn out, in a snap of fingers. And bigger they are, harder they fall, right?

    The story in itself is nothing new or previously unseen, featuring a bright young "sport", Bud Fox (played by Charlie Sheen) who happens to have a lot of potential but is not exactly happy with his stock broker life. He wants more, and hotshot Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) is another broker who embodies everything he wants to become - powerful, vicious, influential and a sure winner. By sheer force of will and unprecedented persistence, Bud sneaks into Gekko's office and tries to prove his value to him. From here on the bulk of the movie shows us the average - but rather well executed in this particular instance - story of the young proteg¨¦ who rises to the top at breakneck speed until, unexpectedly, something shatters his bond to the master. Something that hits home and makes Bud question his beliefs. What this is and how it plays out is the very heart of the movie, so I'll let that for you to find out if you didn't see it yet.

    All the acting is quite superb, especially the relationship between Gekko and Fox. Martin Sheen - who is Charlie Sheen's father both in real life and on the screen - is particularly compelling as a man who believes in hard work, not selling out and not letting others - and yourself - down. He reminds me of Donald Sutherland simply because he also seems to have that ability to outshine everyone whenever he's on screen a couple of minutes at a time.

    If you like high finance intrigue, big guys pulling the strings on each other, twists and turns, then "Wall Street" is probably essential. And it will probably give you an excuse to read Sun Tzu's "The Art of War"....more info
  • One of the Best Movies of the 1980's
    Oliver Stone will never be known for subtlety. "Wall Street" bashes you over the head with its message- getting to the top in society requires duplicity, dishonesty, and the willingness to destroy any obstacle. However, unlike Ayn Rand, Stone vilifies rather than lauds this dubious morality. Bud Fox is a fresh faced, innocent stock broker trying to get ahead through hard work and elbow grease, as he was taught by his father. Bud soon meets powerful, charismatic corporate raider Gordon Gekko, incapable of love, remorse, or empathy. Gekko, we are told, sold NASA short 15 minutes after the Challenger exploded (impossible since the shuttle was destroyed in 1986 and the film is set in 1985!). Gekko predictably seduces Bud with his world of "perks", and Bud's star rises dramatically the farther he falls into corruption.

    Throughout the film, Bud serves as a sounding board for the rival values of Gekko and his father. The speech most cited by critics and fans is the immortal "Greed is Good" monologue. While this speech, standing alone, is a vigorous defense of capitalism and selfishness, it is important to note that Gekko is using it at a shareholders' meeting against a lousy, entrenched, and greedy management!

    Inevitably, Bud is forced to decide whether to follow his father's philosophy or Gekko's, and to pay the price for his misdeeds. A slight complaint with the ending- the fate of Gekko is hinted at rather than displayed. Gordon Gekko has become something of a hero for young, wanna-be big shots, who are attracted to the glamour of his lifestyle and his "up your's, I got mine!" attitude much as Bud was. Perhaps seeing Gekko get his comeuppance could have made an impression.

    Overall, Wall Street is a tight, well done character drama populated with iconic characters delivering iconic dialogue that acts as an indictment of a decade. The movie and its message will stay with you long after viewing it.

    As for the DVD, the sound, although in 5.1, is relegated almost exclusively to the center channel. One does not hear the sounds of Manhattan from all directions as Bud navigates the concrete jungle. The video quality appears grainy in some areas. This is a great movie worthy of better treatment on DVD....more info

  • Capitalist crime
    'Wall Street' must have some authentic merit given the amount of brokers and actual convicted insider traders that worked on the film. Oliver Stone's father was a Wall Street broker from a previous era. In fact Oliver Stone has been a fan and a supporter of the Wall Street world in which he grew up if anyone had taken the time to read any interviews with him. The difference between his father's time and the 80's financial world he was documenting was a rise in the culture of speculation, a system which in relation to his father's business values, creates and produces nothing for society. Indeed Hal Halbrook's character is Stone erecting his father's ghost, the voice of old Wall Street, where capital brought industry, peace and reason.

    Ironically the rise of high profile busts for insider trading in the 80's may have more to do with a more stringent form of policing rather than a rise in financial greed. Reagan took his eye of corporate mergers, allowing the SFC to concentrate on the brash yet ultimatly small fish of insider trading. As corporate mergers got larger and larger, hostile takeovers skyrocketed and the rise of the parasite financers living off the buying selling of others was here to stay.

    Gordon Gekko's "greed is good" speech has been quoted in more T.V., newspaper and magazine retrospectives of the 80's than I care to remember. There are few characters in modern cinema who have had such a divisive response. Seen as a villain by many and a hero by many others. Gekko is a perfect symbol of the economic and political divide of the 80's...more info
  • STONE TRIED TO DISS CAPITALISM, GLORIFIED IT INSTEAD
    In 1987 OLIVER STONE again starred Charlie Sheen, this time as Bud Fox, along with Martin Sheen and Michael Douglas, in "Wall Street". Stone, like Coppola's "Patton", tapped into a part of America he really wanted to discredit, but instead glorified. Based on the go-go stock markets of the Reagan '80s, it is loosely based on inside arbitrageurs and junk bond kings like Ivan Boesky and Michael Milken. Fox/Sheen is an idealistic, ambitious young stockbroker, his father is his conscience, and Douglas as Gordon Gekko is pure tantalizing temptation. Fox must violate SEC laws and get inside information in order to do business with the "big elephant" Gekko. Gekko's star fades when a big deal-gone-bad has personal ramifications, and Fox turns a dime on him. The film is supposed to show that America is a greedy place that "produces nothing" in a "zero sum game" in which the rich only make money on the backs of the poor. Gekko's (Stone's) statements about economics are pure, unadulterated economic lies shown to be lies simply by...observing factual things. Where Stone may have had second thoughts was the reaction the film got. As the years went by, he and others were approached countless times by Young Republicans and Wall Street execs who told him the depiction of the exciting world of finance led them into that very career, which they thanked him for! Stone had hoped to create an egalitarian class. Instead, he created a decade full of Gordon Gekkos. They in turn fueled the dot-com boom. It was not unlike the Democrats who hoped to expose Oliver North and the Republicans in the Iran-Contra "scandal," only to discover that millions thought Ollie and his White House pals were doing God's work in fighting Communism.
    Res ipsa loquiter.

    STEVEN TRAVERS
    AUTHOR OF "BARRY BONDS: BASEBALL'S SUPERMAN"
    STWRITES@AOL.COM...more info

  • Gekko The Great
    Real-life bigtime investment banker Jeff Beck not only advised Oliver Stone when he made 'Wallstreet' but also stars in this film for a few minutes playing himself at a climactic meeting of topdog-lawyers and bankers. He delivers one of the many exhilarating monologues in this Epic tale of greed, pride and innocence lost. "Now your boss will really start thinking he's Gekko the Great!" He shouts at Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen) who plays a struggling young stockbroker who's desperately trying to get on the fast track to becoming a "player".
    Michael Douglas who plays 'Gordon Gekko' (not 'Gecko' as the Amazon review suggests, the name can be seen in the scene where Charlie Sheen turns on his computer in the morning and finds out it's "Gekko's Birthday") puts on such a mind-blowing performance he really can be dubbed 'Gekko the Great'. The character is right up there with Don Vito Corleone, Tony Montana, Begbie, Popeye Doyle and some other members of that elite group of high-octane male movie-characters that will long outlive the actors that created them.

    Gordon Gekko is a high profile corporate raider that was probably modelled after Ivan Boesky (the biggest corporate raider of the 80's who eventually went behind bars for insider-trading), Michael Milken (creator and unchallenged 80's king of the high yield or junk-bond) and John Guttfreund (CEO of Salomon Brothers in the 80's who's extravert and bizarre behaviour is documented in the classic books "Liar's Poker" (Michael Lewis) and "Barbarians at the Gate" (John Helyar).

    Michael Douglas seems to have been born to play this part and from the moment he is introduced ("Lunch? whaddaya kiddin' me, lunch is for wimps!") to the moment we viewers have to part from his hypnotic character ("I gave you Darian, I gave you everything!") he reduces any leaps of faith that his character may present us with to tiny hops due to his powerhouse presence. In fact, whenever I see Michael Douglas in another movie I have the strange feeling that Gordon Gekko is trapped inside and might burst out at any time to hose us down with sardonic one-liners. ("Love is just an old lie created to keep people from jumping out of windows.")

    Gekko is truly the mother of all high rollers, and his performance alone more than warrants the purchase of this film. Apart from that it looks great with crisp Miami Vice type of clean-cut shots and scenery. The whole set up is utterly believable. I work in Derivatives Sales in London and deal with brokers, traders and senior decision makers of the world's leading investment firms on a daily basis. Either they all modelled themselves after Gordon Gekko or for some reason Michael Douglas got it exactly right. Aggression, impatience with political correctness and urgency to get deals/trades done is what this movie and real Capital Markets are all about.

    Charles Sheen plays a believable 'Bud Fox' but one wonders what a late 80's Tom Cruise or Kiefer Sutherland might have done with the part. Charlie never really creates the electricity that Douglas shocks the audience with. A baffling fact is that Stone admits on this DVD in an interview that Cruise called him to say he'd love to play the part but Stone "had already promised it to Charlie".

    I won't get into the details of the story here but will post some comments on the general themes in the movie.

    There's the theme that Stone had already explored in 'Platoon' of two fathers fighting for the soul of their son. In Platoon it was Tom Berenger and Willem Defoe battling for custody of Charlie Sheen's spirit. In Wallstreet it's Douglas and Martin Sheen representing the 'exciting but evil' and 'wholesome but tedious' ways to go for Charlie Sheen's character. This theme introduces some good tension in the storytelling.
    The other theme that Stone put into this narrative is the bleeding heart "Capitalism is bad and unfair" jingle. "I don't produce anything...I own..." Gekko confesses at one point. "How many boats to water-ski behind do you need? When is it enough?!" cries a shocked Bud Fox. The moral comments on successful capitalists come across somewhat naive and in my opinion don't really work. I won't go into the details but most people I've met who've seen the movie don't even remember what it was about Gordon Gekko that was so wrong. All they remember is the classic "Greed is Good" speech and ironically most of them agree with Gekko on the issue. The fact that Oliver Stone lets Gekko initiate industrial espionage is the reason I gave the movie only four stars instead of five.

    I personally think this was a real blooper. A man in Gekko's position doesn't need the aggravation of blatantly breaking the law. There's a good plot line concerning a fictive company 'Bluestar Airlines' that Gekko has perfectly legal plans with to make himself rich and get scores of hard working people fired that adds enough suspense to the tale. It seems as though Stone was so set on painting a negative picture of egotistical an a-moral Wall-Streeters that he went one bridge too far.

    Fact is that, if anything, this movie is like a recruiting video for Investment Banking. What "Top Gun" did for Naval Aviation "Wall Street" has done for Investment Banking. Big corporate banks have never had to complain about the amount of interested well-educated young hopefuls but nowadays there's probably not one person sitting in any dealing room anywhere in the world who has not seen Wall Street. For one I am convinced that if it wasn't for the scenes that have the camera following runners and stressed out yuppies yelling "How about those September fifties!" I wouldn't have been in this racket.

    The dealing room-scenes are some of the most exhilarating scenes in the history of cinematography. Spielberg immersed audiences with his scenes of Normandy's beaches in '44. Stone creates the same spellbinding grip on the audience without getting anybody shot or brutally maimed. That alone is a great achievement for any director in Hollywood. More so for the man who made a career in gory cinematic violence with the screenplay for 'Scarface' and directing 'Platoon' and 'Natural Born Killers'.

    All Hail Gekko the Great! See this movie again and again. It's full of catchy one-liners that will make you not only the toast of any party but might provide you with more of an energy boost than any Tony Robbins video ever will. "Life all comes down to a few moments, this is one of them..."
    ...more info
  • Great!!
    Flawless acting by Michael Douglass (Gordon Gecko), and Charlie Sheen (Bud Fox). Great Movie!...more info
  • A Classic!
    This is a simply a must have. An 80's classic with and excellent perfomance of Michael Douglas, with one of the most powerfull names ever... Gordon Gekko!...more info
  • Wall Street is a Classic
    One of my favorite movies of all time. Made in the mid 80's, the lessons of money and greed on Wall Street reverberates more than ever in these tough economic times. A must see for everyone....more info
  • 3 stars out of 4
    The Bottom Line:

    Wall Street wastes Daryl Hannah but makes up for it with a magnetic Michael Douglas in the lead; it's not one of Oliver Stone's best but it's effective and enjoyable enough....more info
  • Invest your time to watch this one, Finance professionals.
    Proves the point: Grees is good at times !...more info
  • My favourite movie
    I found this movie to be fantastic. I loved every minute of it. Most of this movie seemed to tie in with politics. Being a conservative, I found this very interesting. The plot of millionare Gordon Gekko followed along the ways life should be lived. Greed, power, and self-confidence.

    Revenge was another big part in this movie. I liked how Charlie
    Sheen played his role of Bud Fox. Towards the end the focus was to screw over Gekko and to have sweet revenge.

    From this movie came my favourite quote of all:
    "... greed, for the lack of a better word , is good. Greed is right, Greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essense of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all its forms-greed for life, for money, knowledge has marked an upward surge of mankind..."

    I'm not sure that my way is the way that Oliver Stone intended his movie to be interpereted. Oh well, I don't necessarilly care. Greed is Good!...more info

  • Oliver Stone's Best FIlm...
    Oliver Stone is one of my favorite "Hollywood" filmmakers, and I have enjoyed many of his movies over time. While I haven't seen a few of his works, he has given more than his share of fine cinema from his beginnings, and I count "Platoon," "Born on the Fourth of July," "JFK," and "Nixon" as among his better efforts, and I applaud and repeatedly watch parts of all of these. However, to me, Oliver Stone's "Wall Street" is, overall, his best.

    For one thing, it avoids a lot of the overlength and filler in many of his other films, as well as his sometimes uncomfortable mixture of fact and fiction/speculation. "Wall Street" is pretty much a standard length and mainstream studio production, and while, as in almost all Stone films, it has a message to preach, in this one, he goes for a much lighter, more obscure, and subtle but just as powerful approach. And while this is fiction, and does not really deal with actual known historical or present-day people, the message here, both moral and profound, seems as timely these days as when the movie was first released in the 80's. That "morality" message posits that pursuit of profits and materialistic riches above any/most other considerations, especially above individual human integrity and decency, is an eventually losing proposition for any truly decent, thinking person, with true integrity.

    Being a more "conventional" film, the "morality message" here may pass way over a lot of people's heads, especially those Oliver Stone haters who've never seen this and/or who are automatically turned off to any Oliver Stone effort, but the message remains Stone's most powerful, if obscure. And this is a must see, and Stone's overall best movie.

    Charlie Sheen, (and to a lesser extent, his real life father and cinematic icon Martin Sheen, who amazingly enough plays the main character's real life father), as well as an outstanding performance by oscar-winning Michael Douglas, and other acting gems, as well as a fast-pace, little filler, linear plot and execution, add up to something really special.

    The junior Sheen plays an up and coming and hoping, Wall Street, poor, "player" wannabe, who works as a going nowhere fast financial investments seller within the legal stock market system, whose main goal is to get close to one of the real players in the American financial market. After much effort, he finally and with dogged persistence, gets a short "meeting" with an all powerful, super-rich, almost legendary established player in the form of Michael Douglas.

    Selling his soul early on, "Bud" (Charlie Sheen) soon begins to throw aside all of his roots and basic decent, moral upbringings, as well as the fate of his father and many decent working folks, in order to happily fall under the spell of his sociopathic leader/teacher (Gordon Gekko - Douglas), and enjoys enormous financial "success" within the philosophy of his indecent mentor. For awhile, the almost religious mantra of Gekko's "greed is good" more than succeeds, but for a short time only.

    Before long, Sheen finds himself in a swank upper-east side Manhattan apartment, with money and the company of a beautiful, intelligent, but shallow girl (the best that can be bought), and sees a promising future as a true Wall Street player and wealthy corporate parasite. Trouble is, he loses his soul and moral fiber somewhere along the way, and realizes that for all his material gains, he has hurt the real people closest to him, and has betrayed them and his own self as well.

    While Oliver Stone could've resolved and ended the film in a way he might've these days (strangely and sadly and even more so the same as it ever was concerning rich versus poor, haves versus have-nots, etc.), when corporate interests and money hunger rules over substance, he gives us instead a character who finally and deeply realizes the evil he has helped create, and does something about it.

    If only the true humanitarian message and morals of this film could be realized and understood by our present day corporations, CEO's, power brokers, and by our indecent PTB and politician/law-makers (and the superficial and sensationalist-driven mainstream media and Hollywood elite), this world would be, I believe, a lot better one in which to live.

    This is a film as topical as anything since, unfortunately, but the lessons have yet to be learned, and if anything, the PTB (powers that be) have only since gained more and more, at the expense of others less fortunate. For those viewing this as simply a pretty decent flick, without any heavy moral undertones, it is still Stone's most satisfying and easily understood filmic experience. In addition however, for those who read between the lines, and truly get the under-the-surface morality message here, it simply but powerfully renders upon the viewer a deep questioning of what "success" really is, and at what acceptable cost.

    "Wall Street" was produced in the 80's, but its message and power, seem as true today as ever. Unlike so many other murky or over the top Oliver Stone films though, it remains, and probably will for some time, the definitive cinematic morality play from one of America's greatest filmmakers. Its message is clear, upon repeated viewings, and that is that reality is, we are all in this together, we sink and/or swim together, and harming others in the pursuit of selfish gain, is a moral philosophy doomed to spiritual and individual failure, in the end. No matter how great the temporary materialistic gains.

    If you only see one Oliver Stone film in your life, let it be his best, in my view, this one. If its subtle but sublime morality message does not grab you at first, it probably will eventually, as you think about it more and more later on....more info
  • STONE TRIED TO DISS CAPITALISM, GLORIFIED IT INSTEAD
    In 1987 OLIVER STONE again starred Charlie Sheen, this time as Bud Fox, along with Martin Sheen and Michael Douglas, in "Wall Street". Stone, like Coppola's "Patton", tapped into a part of America he really wanted to discredit, but instead glorified. Based on the go-go stock markets of the Reagan '80s, it is loosely based on inside arbitrageurs and junk bond kings like Ivan Boesky and Michael Milken. Fox/Sheen is an idealistic, ambitious young stockbroker, his father is his conscience, and Douglas as Gordon Gekko is pure tantalizing temptation. Fox must violate SEC laws and get inside information in order to do business with the "big elephant" Gekko. Gekko's star fades when a big deal-gone-bad has personal ramifications, and Fox turns a dime on him. The film is supposed to show that America is a greedy place that "produces nothing" in a "zero sum game" in which the rich only make money on the backs of the poor. Gekko's (Stone's) statements about economics are pure, unadulterated economic lies shown to be lies simply by?observing factual things. Where Stone may have had second thoughts was the reaction the film got. As the years went by, he and others were approached countless times by Young Republicans and Wall Street execs who told him the depiction of the exciting world of finance led them into that very career, which they thanked him for! Stone had hoped to create an egalitarian class. Instead, he created a decade full of Gordon Gekkos. They in turn fueled the dot-com boom. It was not unlike the Democrats who hoped to expose Oliver North and the Republicans in the Iran-Contra "scandal," only to discover that millions thought Ollie and his White House pals were doing God's work in fighting Communism.
    Res ipsa loquiter....more info