The Web    www.100share.com    Google
 
Sharp Objects: A Novel
List Price: $14.00

Our Price: $9.99

You Save: $4.01 (29%)

 


Product Description

As loyal Entertainment Weekly subscribers, we have been fans of Gillian Flynn for her smart, funny, and spot-on reviews of books, movies, and TV, but we were not prepared for her stunning debut novel Sharp Objects, a wickedly dark thriller that Stephen King calls a "relentlessly creepy family saga" and an "admirably nasty piece of work." We're calling it a cross between Twin Peaks and Secretary--sinister, sexy, and stylish. Perfect fall reading. --Daphne Durham


10 Second Interview: A Few Words with Gillian Flynn

Q: Do you prefer writing novels or reviewing?
A: I think writing is more pure--and actually a bit easier for me. It's just me and my laptop, not me and my laptop and a TV show that 30 people have worked on. Reviewing keeps you sharp--I can hardly watch or read anything without taking notes now--but plain old writing I find actually relaxing.

Q: Do think your writing is influenced more by books that you have read, or shows/movies that you have seen?
A: My mom spent her career as a reading teacher and my dad is a retired film professor, so I was really steeped in both books and movies growing up. To this day, when I get my dad on the phone, pretty much his first sentence is "Seen anything good lately?" I love putting words together (I've never met a simile I didn't like), but when I write I often think in "scenes"--I want these two people, in a dirty bar, with this song playing in the background.

Q: I hear you are working on your second book...is it is too early to ask what it's about?
A: I'm still playing around with the whole plot--when I wrote Sharp Objects, I wasn't even sure who the killer was for a bit. But I can say [the new book] has to do with family loyalty, false memories, a wrenching murder trial, and a dash of good 'ole 1980s hair metal and devil worship.

Q: What is your writing process like? Have you changed anything about how you work since your first book?
A: My writing process is incredibly inefficient, and hasn't changed between books. I really don't outline: I know basically how I want the story to start, and vaguely how I want it to end (though like I said, with Sharp Objects even that changed!). Then I just write: Some characters I start finding more interesting, some less. I write entire swaths that I pretty much know I'll cut. I have an entire file of "deleted scenes." I guess the one thing that has physically changed is I moved into a new place since my first book--it has a great bathtub, and I'll prop my laptop up and write in the bath for hours. Which is, admittedly, weird.




WICKED above her hipbone, GIRL across her heart
Words are like a road map to reporter Camille Preaker’s troubled past. Fresh from a brief stay at a psych hospital, Camille’s first assignment from the second-rate daily paper where she works brings her reluctantly back to her hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls.

NASTY on her kneecap, BABYDOLL on her leg
Since she left town eight years ago, Camille has hardly spoken to her neurotic, hypochondriac mother or to the half-sister she barely knows: a beautiful thirteen-year-old with an eerie grip on the town. Now, installed again in her family’s Victorian mansion, Camille is haunted by the childhood tragedy she has spent her whole life trying to cut from her memory.

HARMFUL on her wrist, WHORE on her ankle
As Camille works to uncover the truth about these violent crimes, she finds herself identifying with the young victims—a bit too strongly. Clues keep leading to dead ends, forcing Camille to unravel the psychological puzzle of her own past to get at the story. Dogged by her own demons, Camille will have to confront what happened to her years before if she wants to survive this homecoming.

With its taut, crafted writing, Sharp Objects is addictive, haunting, and unforgettable.


From the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews:

  • Incredibly dark, and hard to put down...
    Recommended by my niece, I finally got around to reading Sharp Objects by Gillian Flynn. This is an extremely dark crime novel that spends far more time in the psychological realm than the criminal world, but it works OK if you're in the right mindset.

    Camille Preaker is a reporter for a second-tier newspaper in Chicago. Her editor decides to send her back to her home town of Wind Gap to write a story on the murder of two young girls. The murders have all the signs of a serial killer, as the bodies are both missing all their teeth. It's his hope that this story will scoop the larger papers and earn the paper some respect. But there's far more at stake for Preaker than just the story...

    Camille grew up in a severely dysfunctional home that left her with emotional and physical scars. One of her sisters died of a mysterious illness when she was growing up. She also has a 13 year old sister that is heavily into drugs, sex, and manipulation. When Preaker arrives in Wind Gap to write the story, plenty of old wounds are opened up, and her whole warped relationship with her mother starts to play out all over. The town has their ideas as to who killed the girls, but Preaker is coming to some uncomfortable realizations as to who might be responsible for it all. And if those realizations are accurate, she has to face some difficult questions about her own personality.

    While there is a crime that's being investigated here, the main plot-line revolves around Preaker and her emotional issues. You learn pretty quickly that she is a cutter, hence the name of the book. It's bizarrely compelling to see how those compulsions play out in her life during periods of stress, which is pretty much all the time. And since it's written in first-person form from Preaker's perspective, you quickly become immersed in her own private hell.

    For a debut novel, Flynn has done a very good job. If you're looking for a pure crime novel, the heavy psychological slant will probably make you a bit uncomfortable. But if you're open to a dark blend of crime and warped minds, this will be a book you'll have a hard time putting down.
    ...more info
  • Sooooo Boring
    I received this book through BookMooch, it was highly recommended. So for me it was HUGE disappointment. Wanted to give up within the first 15 or 20 pages, made myself read until page 70 or so, then skipped to the back. I was completely bored. The ending wasn't even close to be surprising....more info
  • A goog read
    "Sharp Objects" was a good read and a good first effort by the author. You feel for the protagonist, Camille, coming back to her home town after many years away. Some of the characters are poorly developed but overall, it's a good story and one that most of us can relate to on some level....more info
  • Great Book
    I could hardly put this book down, I read it in a day. It kept me on my toes and intrigued the entire time. I felt pulled in and almost like I actually lived there while this was going on. Her writing style was easy to read and very beautiful. I would definitely recommend this book to others. ...more info
  • Delightfully disturbing
    Let me preface this with the fact that I've been a longtime Entertainment Weekly subscriber and a reader of Gillian Flynn's TV reviews. (I'm also a Chicagoan and fan of dark, offbeat mysteries.) This said, although this book started off slightly choppy (er, contrived), by the end I was mesmerized by its dysfunctional story and the mystery itself. The writing was snappy (I wouldn't have expected less)... there were a few red herrings (though I kind of/partially suspected the who)... but by the end I found it both dark and disturbing, yet with a sense of jaded humor. In short, I loved it... and hope her next novel has similar tones (and, hopefully, stays in the mystery genre). ...more info
  • Dark, Insightful, Disturbing
    Book Club Review
    Sharp Objects
    by Gillian Flynn

    Our book club's book for April was SHARP OBJECTS, by Gillian Flynn. We decided on this book because we wanted to try reading something that is more issues-based, and this is a story about a young woman who engages in the disturbing practice of "cutting" (self-mutilation). As a club we do not mind an intense read, and we thought we could all learn more about the psychology behind cutting by reading it.

    The narrator of the book is a reporter for a third-rate Chicago newspaper who is sent back to her hometown of Wind Gap, Missouri, to investigate the murder of a little girl--the second such murder in a short amount of time, which makes it seem like a serial killer is on the loose. The editor thinks that Camille Preaker will be able to get the townspeople to open up and talk, because she is a native. However, Camille goes back only under duress, because she has a very (and I do mean VERY) unpleasant relationship with her mother and stepfather (she doesn't even know who her real father is). She also has a sexually precocious half-sister who alternates between being a sort of Lolita and an almost catatonic clinging vine. Camille's investigation uncovers some truly creepy things going on, including the fact that the two murdered girls were actually quite hateful, and that her own mother had odd relationships with those girls. To say more would be a spoiler.

    We found a lot to like and admire about this book. First, the author is an incredibly sharp writer, full of insights and observations that are often disturbing, delivered in a way that slaps you across the face with their vividness. Second, it was interesting to see the author going so much against "type" -- in other words, having the audacity/courage to make little girls into nasty, vicious creatures instead of sweet, innocent victims. The insights into the narrator's "cutting" are deep and disturbing...The reader comes to realize the source of her behavior and how she is almost powerless to stop herself from playing out the script created in her childhood. There are also some really intense plot surprises here, even if the middle of the book drags a bit.

    What we liked less were some of the more "Southern Gothic" aspects of the book, moments that seemed like they were lifted directly from MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL. Several of the characters are little more than cliches, and the pacing was inconsistent. Still, we all agreed that Flynn is a terrific writer, and we look forward to more by her. It probably does go without saying that this book isn't for the squeamish. It is true noir but it does have just that little ray of hope/possible redemption that keeps you rooting for the heroine.
    ...more info
  • Whoa, what a story!
    This book is incredible. It is like nothing I have ever read before and I am completely in love with it. :D I could not stop reading it until I finished it, it just grabbed me and wouldn't let go. This is a real page turner.
    The main character is Camille, a reporter, who has a troubled past thanks to her EVIL mother. Her next assignment for the not so popular Chicago newspaper she works for, is to go to her home town and find out about the strange little girl murders that occurred there. She has a really hard time as she tries to do her job in this place that brings bad memories of her dead kid sister and seeing her mother just makes it worse since Adora (her mom) is EVIL, ehem, um since Adora never loved her and things are not changing any time soon.
    Camille goes through so much and reading about this is just too interesting you want to read faster and faster in order to find out what's going to happen next.
    I have never read anything by Gillian Flynn and now have got to get me some more of her other works. I loved her writing and this just was not enough, I need more!!!
    -tvandbookaddict.blogspot.com...more info
  • Get past the first 30 pages...
    Ok so I was ready to just donate this book during the first 25-30 pages; and I set it aside for 2-3 weeks; then i picked it up one Saturday afternoon, and was obsessed with it until I finished it on Sunday. Very dark. I really enjoyed the way the plot evolved - the characters were developed slowly, and answered the questions I had during my reading. Good, intense, but very dark. Just get through the soft, slow beginning....more info
  • Fascinatingly gruesome
    I cannot wait to read what Gilliam Flynn writes next! I had a hard time putting this one down. Flynn wrote an intriguing, horrifying, gruesome, and clever tale. This novel delves into taboo subjects, but in no way repells a reader. She tackled serious subject with finesse....more info
  • sharp objects
    this is a great book. It was well paced w/ no dull moments. I highly recommend this book amd also her second book Dark Places. I can not wait for a 3rd one!...more info
  • Dark, Insightful, Disturbing
    Book Club Review
    Sharp Objects
    by Gillian Flynn

    Our book club's book for April was SHARP OBJECTS, by Gillian Flynn. We decided on this book because we wanted to try reading something that is more issues-based, and this is a story about a young woman who engages in the disturbing practice of "cutting" (self-mutilation). As a club we do not mind an intense read, and we thought we could all learn more about the psychology behind cutting by reading it.

    The narrator of the book is a reporter for a third-rate Chicago newspaper who is sent back to her hometown of Wind Gap, Missouri, to investigate the murder of a little girl--the second such murder in a short amount of time, which makes it seem like a serial killer is on the loose. The editor thinks that Camille Preaker will be able to get the townspeople to open up and talk, because she is a native. However, Camille goes back only under duress, because she has a very (and I do mean VERY) unpleasant relationship with her mother and stepfather (she doesn't even know who her real father is). She also has a sexually precocious half-sister who alternates between being a sort of Lolita and an almost catatonic clinging vine. Camille's investigation uncovers some truly creepy things going on, including the fact that the two murdered girls were actually quite hateful, and that her own mother had odd relationships with those girls. To say more would be a spoiler.

    We found a lot to like and admire about this book. First, the author is an incredibly sharp writer, full of insights and observations that are often disturbing, delivered in a way that slaps you across the face with their vividness. Second, it was interesting to see the author going so much against "type" -- in other words, having the audacity/courage to make little girls into nasty, vicious creatures instead of sweet, innocent victims. The insights into the narrator's "cutting" are deep and disturbing...The reader comes to realize the source of her behavior and how she is almost powerless to stop herself from playing out the script created in her childhood. There are also some really intense plot surprises here, even if the middle of the book drags a bit.

    What we liked less were some of the more "Southern Gothic" aspects of the book, moments that seemed like they were lifted directly from MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD AND EVIL. Several of the characters are little more than cliches, and the pacing was inconsistent. Still, we all agreed that Flynn is a terrific writer, and we look forward to more by her. It probably does go without saying that this book isn't for the squeamish. It is true noir but it does have just that little ray of hope/possible redemption that keeps you rooting for the heroine.
    ...more info
  • "It is impossible to compete with the dead. I wish I could stop trying."
    Horror skates blithely through this novel, surfacing periodically in frissons of malice. This author enjoys a special talent: the painful excavation of the female psyche. Women receive no special treatment, are expertly dissected, demystifying the myth of kindness and comfort associated with females. As in Dark Places, Flynn's female characters are unpredictable, unlikable, often intimidating, sometimes violent. This grim view of womankind continues in Sharp Objects, as reporter Camille Preaker is sent on assignment by her third-rate Chicago newspaper, The Daily Post, to cover the death of a young girl and the disappearance of another in her home town of Wind Gap, Missouri. Staying with family, mother, step-father and thirteen-year-old step-sister, Amma, does not make for a happy homecoming. Rather, a tension-filled, antagonistic atmosphere permeates the family home, a pristine Victorian house filled with expensive objects and bad intentions.

    Clearly, Camille has private demons, not the least of which is a dependency on alcohol to soften the edges of reality and a compulsive scribbling of words on her wrist, as though to seal them in memory. As Camille works her sources, forced to confront her past in Wind Gap, one death becomes two when the missing child is found, both children bearing a common horrifying mutilation. Camille interviews old friends and former acquaintances, the reluctant families of the dead girls, a Kansas City cop brought in on the case. Here is troubled territory, indeed. Meanwhile, Camille's distant mother refuses to tolerate the ugliness her daughter brings into her carefully controlled environment. Under her mother's roof, a long dead younger sibling competes with an enigmatic half-sister, a changeling who is a sweet, compliant daughter at home, a wild, cruel creature in the world. Menace bubbles just beneath the surface, a thin veneer of domesticity hiding family secrets deep and dark.

    Not for the faint of heart, Flynn writes with the ferocity of a feral child. Reduced to the helpless pawn of a controlling mother, Camille flails about, discovering facts about the murders that threaten to unravel her hard-won peace of mind. While the police favor a transient or the brother of one of the victims, Camille is pulled in an entirely different direction. At one point I found this dance on the dark side nearly unbearable, a nightmare of past and present, unresolved issues and night terrors, Camille's only defense to drink herself into oblivion. In Flynn's disturbing, unforgettable thriller, every place has its own brand of violence, comfort is transient and terror waits patiently on the other side of the door. Luan Gaines/2009.


    ...more info
  • I wouldn't really recommend this....
    Unless you're interested in reading yet another book about a "damaged" heroine. Someone who's tragic and scarred and traumatized by emotional/sexual hurts from childhood that dictate that she can't possibly live a halfway functional adult life. I wanted so much to like Camille but her behavior (acting out in her 30s) ticked me off as did the attitudes of just about everyone in this quaint, little Missouri town. What a toxic place! No wonder the heroine is such a train wreck between the seething malice of everyone she encounters and her nut-job family (i.e. a thoroughly unbelievable, highly sexualized/manipulative 13-year old sister and a hateful, one-dimensional mother)! Anyway, I did finish this book because I so wanted this novel to move past the abject hopelessness. But, unfortunately, that never really happened. I truly wanted Camille to have some redeeming qualities, but, ultimately, I couldn't connect with a grown woman who characterized a little girl as "the piggy middle child, who now waddled dazedly into the room, [who] was destined for needy sex and snack-cake bingeing." ...more info
  • Better Than I Expected
    I almost gave up on this one about 25 pages in, for the same reasons others have hated it. A VERY unsympathetic protagonist and unrealistic depiction of small town life and teenagers. For lack of anything better to read I stuck with it, and it turned out better than I thought. There are reasons Camille behaves the way she does, and it's actually rather brave of Flynn to depict such a messed up, apparently unappealing lead (esp. a woman). So kudos for that. For the story itself -- it would be a good airplane or beach read....more info
  • Fabulous...if you're dark....
    ...and I appreciate a dark worldly view so I loved this first novel. The main character is nothing like you've seen before and there is even a surprise ending. The author took a lot of chances in creating her main character and I applaud the courage it took to make her sooo godawful flawed. The basic plot is: very troubled reporter goes to her hometown to investigate some ghastly murders and comes face to face with her own ghoulish family. Southern Gothic all the way. I raced through it because it was so well-written and suspenseful. ...more info
  • Oh, But For the Few
    From the second you open Gillian Flynn's "Sharp Objects", you know you're not reading a dime mystery novel. From the get-go, Flynn's sharp writing drives the story with the force of a turbine engine. Her prose is easy to follow, compact, and beautiful - written with the type of thin, "Say-What-You-Mean" edge that would make Stephen King drool.

    For her debut novel, Flynn has crafted a beautifully twisted story dealing with the intricacies of small town wickedness (hello again, Mr. King), dysfunctional families, and the dark places of the human mind. The story's leading lady is a compelling, and disturbed journalist named Camille Preaker. Flynn leads Camille through a serious of disturbing murders which continually reflect her own childhood, forcing her to confront demons of her past.

    For a first release, Sharp Objects is captivating. A feat many other authors would be jealous of. The book will haunt you, begging to be picked up again. While it won't scare the living daylights out of you, you'll probably find yourself squeeming in your chair.

    However, Sharp Objects does have it's flaws - for all it's twists and unpredictable moments, there are equally predictable and forseen moments. The conclusion feels rushed, and almost forced (though satisfying at the same time).

    Sharp Objects will appeal to any thriller/suspense/mystery/horror fan. It's non-literary, so-real-it's-twisted reading. Definitely worth checking out. Puts Gillian Flynn on the map for future reading. ...more info
  • Sharp Objects
    What a fantistic debut novel! Creepy mother, dead sister, eery 13 year old half sister who alternates from sing-song childishness to drugs and promiscuity. A murder mysetery in a small town. A protagonist who carves words on her body. I am the complete target audience for this book. What's not to love?...more info