The Deep End
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  • This Emperor has no clothes, folks
    Don't be misled by some good reviews--this movie stinks.
    I like indie movies. I don't mind slow movies. Love suspense. I had great hopes for this.

    Boy, were those dashed.

    This film is about as illogical as they come. The central conceit is fundamentally hollow, there's one contrivance after another, and the filmmakers are much more interested in coincidence than suspense. Add in a juvenile fixation with water and insipid dialogue, and you've got a ruined Saturday night.

    And to those of you who've seen it, what the hell was that white flash before the credits? It was played as important , but was never explained or justified whatsoever.

    If you want to see an incredibly tight, twisty, suspenseful film with tangible sexual tension, rent BOUND instead....more info

  • Well-done modern film noir
    "The Deep End" is a great film noir thriller that's made even better by Tilda Swinton's amazing performance as a mother who does whatever is necessary to protect her son, despite the fact that he made have done a truly terrible thing. Co-directors Scott McGehee and David Siegel understand the power of melodrama and use it to full effect here. This is excellent adult entertainment.

    Margaret [Swinton] discovers that her 17-year old son is having an affair with a much older man and tries to put a stop to it. She doesn't succeed. When she finds the man dead near the boathouse of the family's Lake Tahoe home, she assumes the worst and takes measures to assure that her son's promising future is not ruined. Everything she does, though, only causes her to go deeper and deeper into a world of homicide and blackmail. The audience is draw into the story because it knows things Margaret and other characters don't.

    Of special note are the coldly beautiful cinematography by Giles Nuttgens and the haunting musical score by Peter Nashel. The script is a fine one. Sure, there are too many coincidences and improbable happenings, but these things occur in virtually all movie thrillers. Often, it's how they are handled that counts, and McGehee and Siegel handle them with finesse....more info

  • A rare suspense film of subtlety and depth
    The Deep End is one of my top ten favourite films of 2001. This moody, suspenseful and very intelligent suspense drama about a mother who finds herself in a terrifying situation with a couple of blackmailers is told with great subtletly and superb style.

    Criticised by some as being logic free, I dont disagree that some plot turns are flawed (eg anyone disposing of a body would not do so in such shallow water. Why did the blackmailers presume that the main character could come up with $50,000.00 in less than 24 hours? etc)but the taut, effortless direction, inspired casting, elegant cinematography and surprising emotional depth make The Deep End a superior and absorbing tale with characters who are truly complex and interesting to watch.

    The terrific performances only enhance the enjoyment as Tilda Swinton gives a masterly, fresh portrayal as Margaret Hall, a good, dedicated mother who will do anything for her children and Goran Visnijic who adds a real humanity to his role of Alex Spera, a initially cold hearted blackmailer whose conscious starts to kick in when he fully realises what he is doing to Margaret and her family. Supporting actors are also solid and Raymond Barry is convincingly menacing in his two scenes as Spera's more vicious crime partner.

    Oh, and Lake Tahoe looks absolutely stunning, a unique and extremely effective backdrop for this film' story. Excellent. ...more info
  • The Deep End
    In this vivid nail-biter, a remake of Max Ophuls's "The Reckless Moment," the underused, underrated Swinton gives a flawless performance as a woman who must carry on with the mundane details of her life while bearing a life-threatening burden alone. Visnjic excels as the conflicted middle-man, but Barry is most memorable as an impatient, cold-blooded gangster. Even with momentary graphic sex and some violence, the film's dramatic tension derives from Swinton's character, and our appreciation of one mother's lonely, desperate predicament. Taut and suspenseful, "The Deep End" is not to be missed....more info
  • Just Okay
    This film is beautifully photographed and very well acted by its lead, but -- spoiler alert, I'm going to talk about the plot now -- WHY did this seemingly intelligent woman choose to dump the body so close to shore rather than truly in "the deep end" of the lake where it might never be found? (I mean, Tilda Swinton could have at least found a handy kelp bed or something that might have disguised the submerged body a little better.)

    The character of the handsome extortionist was rather thinly drawn, as well, but I don't agree with the reviewers who think the teenage son should have been more open about the whole affair with his mother to start with. Wake Up Call: talking about sexual matters with your parents at that age is very awkward, probably especially so when you're gay and they're straight. (Maybe this would have played better if the son had appeared to truly be 17 or so. The actor looked to be closer to 20...to me, anyway.)

    I was glad to see a carefully crafted film, but the plot could have been more thoroughly worked out....more info

  • Not especially credible
    The dead bodies just continue to pile up here, but the cops never seem to catch on. No fingerpints? You'll have to suspend your disbelief to get through this silly genre exercise that revives a short story from the 1940s. It's an updated film noirish tale about a mom's desperate efforts to cover up what she mistakenly thinks is her gay 17-year-old son's involvement in a murder. Some suspense, but it's mostly kind of a laugh. Tilda Swinton is interesting, as usual....more info
  • Taut little early masterpiece
    A mother raising her family mostly on her own while her husband is at sea for long spells, in an upper-middle class cottage on the shores of Lake Taho. Her self-absorbed son has been exploring his sexuality with a smarmy older man, and Mom intervenes in desperation. The smarm has a few too many and comes looking for his young paramour at the family home, with disastrous consequences that plunge Mom into even more desperate waters. Then things take a turn for the worse. This film isn't going to be on your "top 100 of all time" list, but it is a savvy effort with exceptional performances from the leads, great direction and craftful filming, top-notch editing, and decent script-writing. It has the feel of early Hitchcock with better film, and you'll find yourself returning to it every once in a while to refresh your memory of the fine performances by Vilnik and Swinton at their best. The score is haunting, and the scenery is too, despite the natural beauty of it all. The movie has a polish that belies its low-budget making, and despite the occasionally contrived events as Mom faces her dilemna, the movie is most satisfying. If you enjoy watching "The 39 Steps" every once in a while, you'll not be going off the deep end when you buy this - it's not an action-packed comicbook extravaganza, but a darned good flick for a quiet evening....more info
  • A Little-Known Gem
    Usually, when you hear constant positive buzz about a film, it tends to let you down. I felt that way about "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" and "The English Patient". So when I kept reading glowing reviews of "The Deep End", I was hesitant to fall for them. I expected it to be another disappointment.

    I was wrong.

    Ably directed by Scott McGehee and David Siegel, "The Deep End" is a lovely, atmospheric, domestic drama about the lengths to which a mother will go to protect her son. When Margaret Hall (Tilda Swinton, in a fine performance) finds the body of her teenage son's lover on the beach by her home, she reacts by dumping the body in the lake, and not telling anyone about it. Soon, a dark, brooding man named Alek Spera (Goran Visnjic) appears, demanding money in exchange for a tape showing Margaret's son and the dead man.

    From there, "The Deep End" takes many twists and turns (some believable, some a bit contrived). Yet, it is essentially a simple tale, about the love between a mother and a son. Tilda Swinton deserved an Oscar nomination for her haunting portrayal of a desperate mother. Everything about "The Deep End" is wonderful, from the cinematography (Lake Tahoe has never looked so beautiful), to the music and performances. This is one of those films that are little-known, but worth digging up. It is rewarding to experience....more info

  • Beautiful and Haunting.
    I absolutely loved this movie! It has such a beautiful under-tone to it. On the surface of the movie we have themes like, betrayl, murder and deception, but on the "deep end" it had one theme: unconditional love. It really showed how selfless this mother was in regards to her children. She is willing to go to any lengths to protect them including disposing of her son's sleezy boyfriend's body after he accidentally falls off a dock and onto an anchor, after her son walks away from a cofrontation the two men had just had. The mom takes the body to a secluded part of the lake, without her son having a clue what has happened, and dumps the body.
    The body is found by police and a man shows up at her door, requesting that she pay him $50,000 or else he turns over a video tape to the police showing her son and the dead boyfriend "in the act".
    Anyways, I'm not going to give away the entire plot. But as messed up as things are on the surface for Margaret (Tilda Swimton), she is willing to do anything to keep her son in the clear, and making sure he has a good future.
    I can't recommend this movie enough, it is really great. It will stay with you after it ends, and really make you think....more info
  • Interesting Noir Film!
    This remake from the Reckeless moment has many points to wein. The interior drama, the triple crossroads feelings in this mother, and the outer intrigue of the pressure exerted by the blackmail, plus a superb photography and good cast conform to my mind a film above the average.
    The picture is far from being another explosions and special effect picture. It's a challenege to the viewer and maintains its force till the unexpecetd end.
    Recommended without reserves. ...more info
  • Smouldering intensity, but few genuine thrills
    Despite its intricate plot developments and sophisticated surface gloss, "The Deep End" (2001) - co-written and directed by Scott McGehee and David Siegel as a belated follow-up to their well-received debut feature "Suture" (1993) - is more of a mood-piece than an outright thriller. Based on the novel 'The Blank Wall' by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding (filmed once before by Max Ophuls as "The Reckless Moment" [1949]), "The Deep End" updates an old-fashioned story for modern sensibilities: Tilda Swinton (longtime favorite of the late Derek Jarman) plays the devoted mother of 'sensitive' teen Jonathan Tucker ("Sleepers", "The Virgin Suicides") who's just broken up with abusive boyfriend Josh Lucas ("Alive", "The Hulk") following a violent quarrel. After discovering Lucas' corpse in front of their beautiful lakeside house - he had stumbled drunkenly and was fatally impaled after parting company with Tucker - Swinton assumes that he was murdered, and she moves the body to another location, hoping to conceal her son's involvement in the 'crime'. When the body is later recovered by police, she's confronted and blackmailed by a handsome stranger (Goran Visjnic, 'ER') who has evidence apparently linking Tucker to the victim...

    In a Sundance Channel featurette which accompanies this DVD, McGehee and Siegel compare their work to the films of Douglas Sirk and Vincente Minnelli, most notably "Magnificent Obsession" (1954) and "Tea and Sympathy" (1956), but while "The Deep End" employs all the trappings of melodrama (multilayered story, clearly defined characters, corkscrew plot developments, etc.), it swaps the commercial artifice of those vintage potboilers for an altogether more subdued narrative style, allied to a range of intense, carefully modulated performances. Swinton anchors the film as a dedicated parent who pays a heavy price for loving her son too much, while Visnjic smoulders beautifully as a would-be villain forced to re-evaluate his moral position when confronted by Swinton's desperate reaction to his demands. Production-wise, the movie is near-flawless: Giles Nuttgens' widescreen photography makes a virtue of the glorious Lake Tahoe settings, and Peter Nashel's haunting theme music loans the film an appropriately solemn tone from the outset. Too slow for mass appeal, too clever to be dismissed, "The Deep End" is very much an acquired taste.

    20th Century Fox's region 1 DVD runs 100m 48s and provides not only a beautifully-rendered print of the film itself - the gleaming Panavision images are reproduced in letterbox format (2.35:1), anamorphically enhanced, and there's a choice of 5.1 or 2.0 Dolby tracks, both as restrained as the movie itself - but also a crash course in low budget filmmaking. The directors' audio commentary reveals a wealth of 'invisible' artistic decisions which play a vital role in selling the drama on a purely psychological level, and the aforementioned featurette (24m 5s) covers a single sequence (one of the film's best, an acting showcase for Swinton) and the manner in which this pivotal moment was developed during rehearsal, all the way through to filming - fascinating, eye-opening stuff. English captions and subtitles are provided, along with a trailer which portrays the movie as some kind of Hitchcockian thriller......more info

  • Poetic, lush and breath-taking suspense drama
    A movie I loved so much that I actually stayed on my treadmill till it was over, extending my usual hour-long workout into 2 hours (and I'm paying the price today, ouch!)
    From the opening scene to the last credit, you won't be able to tear your eyes from the screen. Tilda Swinton, the star and focus of this film, is perfect in the role of a woman trying to protect her family from tragedy while maintaining her daily routine.
    A brief summary: Her adolescent son has been piecked up by a manipulative man and then the man tries to blackmail the boy's mother for money. Afterwards, he dies in cirucmstances that make the boy a possible suspect - although he is, in fact, innocent (I'm not giving anything away here; all of this is revealed early on in the movie).
    Swinton is calmly focused (most of the time), single-mindedly determined in her quest to hold everything together in the face of nearly insurmountable odds. She is equally determined to make sure her family - son, 2 daughter, elderly father-in-law - aren't aware of what is going on, of the tragedy that took place within minutes of their front doorstep. Meanwhile, her life is changing but not in ways she could have foreseen. In spite of her best efforts, she can't control everything.
    Watching Swinton juggle all her everyday duties (cooking, cleaning, keeping the kids organized and on time for school and after school activities) while dealing with the burden of hiding a body, covering up the evidence and keeping everyone in the dark, I couldn't help marveling at her apparent selflessness in the face of so much and at her incredible ability to fool those around her.
    This movie is one of the best of the year. Don't be so swept up by the story,however, that you miss the visual details that are breath-takingly poetic in beauty and intensity. The lingering shots of Swinton's face, the color of the water, the way a drop falling from the kitchen faucet (framing a face in the drop) can punctuate the mood of the moment....more info
  • A Beneath the Surface Thriller
    This is a fantastic film. Never once does it smack you over the head and inundate you with twists. Instead it slowly lures you in and holds on until it's over. If you're reading this review, chances are you already know what the film is about, since you have to pass the synopsis to get to this point. So the best thing for me to do is to give you an honest opinion and that is to see this movie. If you have the ability to use your brain, this film is for you. If not, scroll back to the top of the page and type in 'I Know What You Did Last Summer.' Tilda Swinton is absolutely amazing, and Goran Visnjic is completely compelling. There is one close-up towards the end that will absolutely break your heart. And what is so great about it is that the movie doesn't pander to you, and that is why so many people don't like it. Sure the son is a jerk. But what teenager isn't? One reviewer has complained that the boy doesn't deserve what his mother does for him. And that reviewer is right. But Parental love is to never give up on your child and love them no matter what they do, or how they act. Swinton's character reacts to that instinct. Sure, what she does is inplausible and no one here would probably act the same way, but that's why it's a movie. Hitchcock wasn't plausible, but it is that inplausibility that draws you in and makes for a good movie. I implore you to see 'The Deep End', and come up with your own opinion. If you don't like it, 'Scooby-Doo' comes out this summer. If you do, consider yourself rewarded....more info
  • A Taut Psycho-thriller with the Amazing Swinton
    Tilda Swinton has always had the power to amaze audiences by donning an ambiguous, almost generic presence in her films. She is neither man nor woman in "Orlando" for example, and here, in this new release she proves why critics around the world consider her one of the finest actresses in film today. Denied Oscar nominations for this and Orlando, the actress shines in an almost thankless role as a mother protecting her eldest son from a potentially disastrous situation that threatens his future. When she discovers his boyfriend's body on a beach near her home, she goes to work, burying the evidence and taking great personal risks to protect her child from harm's way. Soon, she is being blackmailed by the man's cronies and ends up in a game of cat and mouse that occassionally takes the breath away. The male lead - Goran Visnjic - is a sore spot in the movie, and one reason the film in the end isn't as effective as it might be otherwise. HIs con man, who ends up with feelings for his victim, is neither here nor there - and his poor command of English doesn't help matters. Sometimes, you find yourself wondering what he's said, while other times, it's so unimportant to the plot, you're wondering why something was written in the script in the first place. That serves ultiumately to derail the film but Swinton does her best mama-protecting-her-cub layered work here. Like "Orlando" this is an actress whose time has come and who must be recognized for the ambisexual textures she brings to every performance. Again, the actress was robbed of an Oscar nod for her work here, and after watching the "Deep End" one can only hope she continues to take risky roles so that a larger audience grows to appreciate the serene presence she brings to every character on screen. A wonderful performance in a less than wonderful film...more info
  • Great movie!
    This is a very interesting and suspenseful movie. You will be so interested in the unique characters and intense plot. Great acting, great movie. I highly recommend it....more info
  • A MOTHER'S LOVE
    Ultimately THE DEEP END is about a mother's love...what she will do to protect her son, her family and their lives. Tilda Swinton is excellent as Margaret Hall, a normal everyday housewife who juggles the usual maternal duties effectively, while her naval officer husband is out to sea. Jonathan Tucker plays her son, Beau, who she discovers has been hanging out with an older guy at a gay club, and she asks the man to stop seeing her son. Once the son finds out, though, he resents his mom's interference, and meets with his lover secretly in their boat house. However, circumstances result in an altercation, and Beau runs off leaving a staggering boyfriend behind, who...well, I won't spoil it for people who haven't seen the movie.
    Tucker is effective as the closeted son, and Peter Donat does a nice turn as the children's grandfather. Raymond J. Barry again turns in a creepy performance (see BEST MEN for more) as a blackmailer who plans to expose Beau's secret unless Tilda comes up with fifty thousand bucks. His partner is played by Goren Visjnic (ER, Spartacus, Practical Magic), who finds himself sympathetic to his victim's plight. Visjnic is certainly a handsome gentleman, but his performance is weak in a pivotal role; his accent doesn't help, either. But due to Swinton's perfectly controlled performance, the movie doesn't cave in because of Visjnic.
    There's some beautiful scenery and neat directorial touches, such as the drop of water through which we see Swinton enter the house and the neat fade from the real mountains of Lake Tahoe to the fake ones at a performance of Swan Lake.
    A very good movie, with an outstanding performance....more info
  • The Impact of Subtlety
    Just as the dreamstate can produce high impact nightmares in a fraction of a second and have it all subsumed by the wakeful state, so does this powerful little low budget film impress far more than its packaging. The theatres are full of horror films and frenzied, noisy thrillers, but few have the impact that THE DEEP END holds. The undercurrents become more treasurable with repeated viewings. Tilda Swinton, always reliably fine and in a performance that deserved all kudos for 2001, captures the blind fear of a mother who would do anything for her beloved son, even shield him from what she feels to be a case of murder. A blackmailer (played with panache by Goran Visnjic) goes about his dirty work only to become involved in the plight of the victim. The interplay of these two characters is extraordinarily subtle acting which makes their developing relationship all the more credible. That such a series of nightmarish incidents could all emerge out of homophobia - both from the son in question and from the world in general - brings us to the breaking point of simultaneous fear and rage and some of the most sensitive parental caring that has appeared on film. Bravo to the writers/directors for sharing much of their behind the scenes experiences on this very well fleshed out DVD....more info
  • Swinton's performance is deeply insightful
    Despite the glowing accolades The Deep End garners as the darling of the Sundance Festival 2001, the unembellished movie cannot acquit itself from its incoherent and illogical slips at times. Yet what has mesmerized critics including Roger & Ebert is probably the dynamic performance of Tilda Swinton who clinches the psychological thriller part with her moral dilemmas and parental obligations conflicting with her anxiety for her closeted gay son. Even my cine-illiterate mother agrees that the movie is more of an exploration of mother-son relationship which is at times touching and poignant. The movie requires patience - which many of the commerical thriller fanatics have little of - and the impact of the vicarious fear comes only after the movie when you relive the horror of making one wrong turn leading to another. ER Veteran Goran Visjinic gives a memorable performance as an sympathetic money-extorting thug along with Josh Lucas as the murdered lover. It isn't every one's cup of tea but it is an interesting essay on the mother-son complex; how the son ends up comforting the mother with a protective streak. Swinton deserves every accolade she is getting with her subtle performance that provides the emotional gravitas that resonate deeper than the artful contrivance in the story....more info
  • Part poem, part domestic drama -COMPLETELY spell-binding
    From the opening scene to the last credit, you won't be able to tear your eyes from the screen. Tilda Swinton, the star and focus of this film, is perfect in the role of a woman trying to protect her family from tragedy while maintaining her daily routine.
    A brief summary: Her adolescent son has been piecked up by a manipulative man and then the man tries to blackmail the boy's mother for money. Afterwards, he dies in cirucmstances that make the boy a possible suspect - although he is, in fact, innocent (I'm not giving anything away here; all of this is revealed early on in the movie).
    Swinton is calmly focused (most of the time), single-mindedly determined in her quest to hold everything together in the face of nearly insurmountable odds. She is equally determined to make sure her family - son, 2 daughter, elderly father-in-law - aren't aware of what is going on, of the tragedy that took place within minutes of their front doorstep. Meanwhile, her life is changing but not in ways she could have foreseen. In spite of her best efforts, she can't control everything.
    Watching Swinton juggle all her everyday duties (cooking, cleaning, keeping the kids organized and on time for school and after school activities) while dealing with the burden of hiding a body, covering up the evidence and keeping everyone in the dark, I couldn't help marveling at her apparent selflessness in the face of so much and at her incredible ability to fool those around her.
    This movie is one of the best of the year. Don't be so swept up by the story,however, that you miss the visual details that are breath-takingly poetic in beauty and intensity. The lingering shots of Swinton's face, the color of the water, the way a drop falling from the kitchen faucet (framing a face in the drop) can punctuate the mood of the moment....more info
  • Beautifully filmed noir piece
    I really like this film. First of all it is absolutely beautiful to look at. Tahoe and water water everywhere - all sumptuously photographed.

    The story is an emotionally intense rollercoaster of the lengths a mother will go to protect her children. Intense, often suspensful and sometimes creepy, this is a keeper.

    Swinton is amazing here - like one raw jangling nerve. SHe is amazing to watch. The rest of the cast is fine their roles, whether shady, clueless or sympathetic.

    Well worth a view....more info
  • good thriller
    "The deep end" is a film that really catches hitchcok's atmosphere. It's a story about a housewife, mother of three kids, who get involved with a crime and blackmail. Tilda Swinton plays the role of Margaret, who finds out her 17 year old boy is having a gay relationship with an older man. After an argument between Margaret's son and his lover, his body is found near the sea deck. Margaret has no choice and needs to protect her son getting rid of the body. A few days later, two men start blackmailing her, because of a tape which reveals Margaret's son having sex with his lover.

    The great thing about this movie is that it reminds me of hitchcok's films. It's not so memorable like his movies, but really keeps hitchcoks tradition of showing a regular person, with a boring life getting involved with a crime scene and challenges she/he would never face. The affair between Margaret and the blackmailer makes the film more powerful, beacuse it's something that stays under the lines, though it moves the film and takes control of the characters action....more info

  • Gripping account of motherly love
    This movie stroke me so real, in spite of the incredible events depicted, which start happening sort-of out of control, like in a "weird" chain reaction. Nonetheless, it's a realistic filmed story, set against the beautiful and very "normal" Lake Tahoe surroundings.

    The picture's credibility and punch rests in the shoulders of outstanding actress Tilda Swinton, whose tour-de-force performance is the main reason of the movie's successful results. She plays an upper-middle class devoted mother who will do anything for her children's happiness, in this case her eldest son's. Her acting is so rich, subtle and restrained, showing the audience a "real" human being, with all the weaknesses, doubts and frailties, inherent to everyone of us.

    This is a picture that deserves serious viewing, that is simply told, devoid of all the artificiality which usually surround this type of stories made-in-Hollywood. There are no easy final resolutions, or not-to-be-believed dialogue that seem taken out of a Shakespearean tragedy, this is a true-to-life believable drama....more info

  • A Fine Romance
    This movie tends to be like the musical score that opens it and weaves through it - simultaneously haunting and irritating.

    Deep End is essentially a two-character play, an intimate dance between a protective mother and her blackmailer. The haunting element is the unexpected, rare fondness that develops unspoken between these two. Their relationship is reminiscent of the saving tenderness and respect that grows between the characters played by Audrey Hepburn and Richard Crenna in Wait Until Dark.

    We feel this blackmailer's inclination to be better than his deeds early on, when he is left briefly alone in his victim's house. We can see him being touched by the order and goodness of the home Margaret has made for her absentee husband and her son. It makes me ache to realize how seldom such quiet appreciation happens in real life. I can hardly imagine a door-to-door salesman being diverted from his strictly commercial manipulations by anything he sees in a house. How much less likely it is that a blackmailer would pause to be charmed by his victim. But then, that's the poetic license we go to movies to find.

    The irritating part of the movie could be the result of a bad editing job. Parts of the movie seem to be missing. For the first quarter of the film, I was distracted by wondering who the older man living in the household was. I may have missed the explanation that he was a grandfather. However, I don't think the puzzling gaps in the relationship between the blackmailer and Margaret were due to my having missed anything. At one point, Margaret refers to the blackmailer's gambling debts. How did she know he even had a penchant for gambling? In the only meetings they presumably have, they are not shown exchanging much personal information at all. The viewer gets the feeling that some crucial scenes definitely got left on the cutting room floor.

    This is too bad, because the main value of this movie lies in its delicate quality of blossoming in the shade. We would like to understand more of what lay at the root of the blackmailer's absorption with the person who started out to be only a job to him. Tilda Swinton, the actress who plays the role of mother, seems too spare and monochromatic to inspire such a reversal, without our seeing more of an interaction between the two.

    However, the haunting, touching aspects of the film very much outweigh its lapses.

    I hope we will get to see Goran Visnjic in more big-screen roles. He makes an indelible impression as a man whose shining impulses can't find expression in such a dull, opaque world.
    ...more info
  • LIKE THE ROMANTICS...
    This movie cannot decide what it wants to be. I will say that it holds your focus though.

    The overall effect is that of an overwrought, almost teenage in its sensibility, quasi-love story. Tilda Swinton is a REAL actress, but she's trying to turn a pile of **** into something honest and true.

    Can't be done.

    This movie is all too like the worst poetry of the romantics: over-worked, elevates too quickly, can't decide what genre it is. Nice watching the beautiful people though....more info
  • maternal love and fateful choices
    "The Deep End", set at beautiful and highly photogenic Lake Tahoe, will absorb your interest. (As area residents, we must add that we had trouble orienting ourselves and some of the directions seemed reversed in the film.) This story of a mother's tender,protective love for her son and for all of her family, when faced with evil from without, is a tale with which every mother can identify. Yet Tilda Swanson's character, Margaret, seems to make a series of wrong choices without thinking through the repercussions. The moral ambiguity in "The Deep End" is troubling, and for this reason, I was left with a bad taste in my mouth. The film resembles "In the Bedroom" in the that sense....more info