Taxi Driver
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Customer Reviews:

  • inspiring is an understatement
    I just bought the 2 disc dvd, and watched it last week. I just thought "there are no actors who can act like that nowadays".
    I also thought the humour was good. Trying to chat up Betsie, chatting to the special security services man, chatting to the pimp. He was so natural. Ive been around a lot myself, and you do get bad ideas in your head, and want to do exactly what Travis did. I suppose thats the point of good acting - making you believe it is real. Given that De Niro was only about 30, he really was amazing. Two thumbs up. The Dear Hunter was also in the same league as this.
    ...more info
  • A slum-land superhero for realists.
    Martin Scorsese, the writer/director of the Taxi Driver, has admitted that this film is the cathartic result of a bevy of dark thoughts that surrounded his mind during a very low period of his life. By the time the credits finally make their merciful way on screen, we can see exactly what Scorsese saw during those days and the residual effect it has on us, the viewers, will likely stay hauntingly familiar long after we have watched the conclusion of this film.

    PLOT:

    Tavis Bickle, a taxi driver and volunteer for a New York City political campaign, has tried it all. He's attempted doing things the right way, treating people with kindness and women with respect. Nevertheless, he is ignored and his chivalrous advances continually stepped upon or altogether discarded by one person after another. It is when Tavis realizes that he will forever be average and overlooked that he decides to make drastic changes in his world. Almost at once he begins driving the most dangerous portions of New York in his taxi, scouring the nighttime landscape with his mind cultivating a solution to his own personal, dark problems. Soon, his decision becomes conclusive: he will become a vigilante, and his first offering to the world will be in aiding a young teenaged prostitute by providing her a way out, no matter what it may cost Tavis personally in the process.

    Perhaps Scorsese's most poignant film, The Taxi Driver offers a bleak, but somehow refreshing, alternative to the concept of "taking it lying down." Here, in his vision, there is another solution, and one in which while many of us fantasize about, almost all of us refuse to make a reality.

    4.5 out of 5
    ...more info
  • SCORSES'S GENIUS IS OBVIOUS
    In 1976, Martin Scorsese directed "Taxi Driver", starring Robert DeNiro. Calling this a "conservative" movie is a stretch, but it is a prescient look at New York attitudes that preceded the age of Giuliani. Paul Schrader wrote it. His story is a hoot in and of itself. He and his brother were raised in a strict Calvinist Pennsylvania family, emphasizing the strictest tenets of Scripture and absolutism. The Calvinists are big on pre-ordained destiny. Released from this environment, he came to Hollywood and tried everything. Naturally, he was a mess; a drug addict, an alcoholic and a heterosexual so confused he tried homosexuality just?to try it. Given the assignment to write a screenplay, he was holed up in a downtown L.A. hotel for weeks, then months. He had little social contact except occasional taxi rides to restaurants in and around L.A.'s skid row. He began to see the world from inside the taxi, and came up with a character and a plot revolving around the concept.
    DeNiro's Travis Bickle is a Vietnam Marine vet, off kilter but moral, who is sickened by the crime, drugs and immorality of 1970s New York City, seen from the taxi he drives night and day. He has an ill-fated fling with a pretty campaign worker (Cybil Shephard), goes off the deep end and portrays himself as a possible assassination threat to a Presidential candidate, although this is never fleshed out. In the end, he commits an act of vigilantism to save the life of a teenage prostitute with potential (Jodie Foster), and like in "Death Wish" (Charles Bronson), is made a hero.
    The message of "Taxi Driver" is that peace comes from strength. It was a popular theme in a number of flicks. Hollywood seemed to fail to grasp some important realities about its marketplace. Time after time, movies that veered away from "touchy feely" liberalism and gave teeth to conservative characters (Eastwood's "Dirty Harry", Bronson, DeNiro, and others) made boffo box office, yet the industry has never come to grips with itself. They return time after time to premises that insult conservative audiences, and wonder why the lines get shorter....more info
  • SCORSES'S GENIUS IS OBVIOUS
    In 1976, Martin Scorsese directed "Taxi Driver", starring Robert DeNiro. Calling this a "conservative" movie is a stretch, but it is a prescient look at New York attitudes that preceded the age of Giuliani. Paul Schrader wrote it. His story is a hoot in and of itself. He and his brother were raised in a strict Calvinist Pennsylvania family, emphasizing the strictest tenets of Scripture and absolutism. The Calvinists are big on pre-ordained destiny. Released from this environment, he came to Hollywood and tried everything. Naturally, he was a mess; a drug addict, an alcoholic and a heterosexual so confused he tried homosexuality just?to try it. Given the assignment to write a screenplay, he was holed up in a downtown L.A. hotel for weeks, then months. He had little social contact except occasional taxi rides to restaurants in and around L.A.'s skid row. He began to see the world from inside the taxi, and came up with a character and a plot revolving around the concept.
    DeNiro's Travis Bickle is a Vietnam Marine vet, off kilter but moral, who is sickened by the crime, drugs and immorality of 1970s New York City, seen from the taxi he drives night and day. He has an ill-fated fling with a pretty campaign worker (Cybil Shephard), goes off the deep end and portrays himself as a possible assassination threat to a Presidential candidate, although this is never fleshed out. In the end, he commits an act of vigilantism to save the life of a teenage prostitute with potential (Jodie Foster), and like in "Death Wish" (Charles Bronson), is made a hero.
    The message of "Taxi Driver" is that peace comes from strength. It was a popular theme in a number of flicks. Hollywood seemed to fail to grasp some important realities about its marketplace. Time after time, movies that veered away from "touchy feely" liberalism and gave teeth to conservative characters (Eastwood's "Dirty Harry", Bronson, DeNiro, and others) made boffo box office, yet the industry has never come to grips with itself. They return time after time to premises that insult conservative audiences, and wonder why the lines get shorter....more info
  • Powerful! Gripping! Excellent!
    This movie is very powerful and is certainly deserving of its Top 100 AFI rating. This is the story of madness and the slow decent into criminal violence that it leads Taxi Driver Bickle when he sees it as the only way out of a hopeless situation. Loneliness can be a terrible thing to deal with and while most people struggle with it and choose a more conventional and healthy solution others with mental illness or who are prone to it "choose" different paths that may lead to self-destruction or as in the case of Travis Bickle, vigilante-ism and taking the law into his own hands to set things "right." The lonely angry psychopath who reacts in this way is the ticking time bomb that unfortunately is almost never recognised until the effects of their madness come to fruition e.g. the Unabomber etc. DeNiro does an excellent job in portraying this individual and is genuinely scary in his role; even scarier is the realisation that perhaps at some point in our lives the vast majority of us have at least contemplated taking things into our own hands and so to some extent perhaps even identify and even find ourselves rooting for Travis. The violent end may have shocked 70s audiences and you get the sense that Scorcese even toned it down a little for fear of a public backlash but it's interesting to me that as violence in film has been getting worse and worse over the years, I felt that it was pretty tame given what we are exposed to these days e.g "Kill Bill", "Blade" etc and I thought the final scenes were not violent enough relative to today's films. Ironically, Bickle is treated as a hero and is not punished for his murders in the end which is also interesting as this ticking time bomb is released into the streets in an ominous ending which leaves us expecting a sequel of some sort. I would like to see a Director's Cut of this movie and to see how Scorcese would "modernise" this brilliant film for today's audiences. In my opinion, this is the best film since "Midnight Cowboy" to expose the seady side of the 70s New York City underbelly although it is just as powerful a film for its impact on its audience.

    This dvd version of the film though is a bit of a mixed bag as although the picture and sound quality have been cleaned up the sound quality in 2 channels isn't very good and I'm glad that in the newer 2-Disc and upcoming Blu-ray versions you'll get the Dolby Digital 5.1 Surround sound option which I hope sounds much better than what we get here. The picture quality isn't perfect as a few frames here and there have spots and other imperfections on them but I thought it was done well enough to not detract from the overall viewing enjoyment. The Special Features includes a good making-of documentary with interviews with Scorcese and the cast.

    Overall this is a great study into the lone, crazed anti-hero and is certainly one of the better films that I've ever seen. You may however want to give this particular dvd version a miss and go instead for either the Blu-ray or the other 2-disc standard version with the improved sound quality....more info
  • One of the most overrated movies ever
    I gave it 1 star for Robert DiNiro's mohawk. Story is about a bunch of low end, useless people that the politicians use constantly as excuses to raise taxes. Robert DiNiro and Jody Foster are the most over rated actors in the biz. The academy award should have gone to Harvey Keitel one of the most under rated actors, he was terrific as Jody's pimp. Don't bother with this one....more info
  • "All the animals come out at night......."
    This is the main observation of Travis Bickle, rookie NYC cab driver who has recently returned from active duty in the Viet Nam war. He cruises the mean and scummy skid row streets on the midnight shift, loathing the locals while he steals from his employer by "doing it off the meter".

    Played by Robert De Niro (in what must be his twenties), Travis exudes all the makings of a spring wound too tight and ready to explode into a million pieces. Obvious signs of post traumatic stress including dependence on drugs and alcohol, inability to relate to "normal" people back in the USA, combined with a repulsion of those "night animal people" he services with his taxi, latent racist tendencies, and an underlying contempt for authority and the society who seemed indifferent to the war or those in it create a character who is a walking time bomb with many potential targets to choose from to vent his rage. It is a rage that simmers just beneath the surface and is never physically visible to those around him.



    "She appeared like an angel out of this filthy mess."

    Travis's first sighting of Betsy (Cybill Shepherd) was nicely photographed in slow motion. He finds a way to meet and charm her into having lunch with him. He asks her to a movie, she agrees and he now has an opportunity to have a relationship with a smart and beautiful woman. But on his way to the date the music is somber and we see Travis plodding slowly toward what we know will be a doomed encounter. The only world to Travis is fifty square blocks of seedy, dirty, crime infested neighborhoods including the local porno theatre where (to Betsy's horror) Travis takes her for their movie date. He thought it would be okay because "lots of couples go there". He wasn't trying to be salacious; he just didn't know any better. She leaves abruptly. Across the street from the porno theatre is a regular movie house showing regular movies.

    He sends her flowers numerous times, phones to ask forgiveness and another date. This scene is probably the most pivotal and one of the best scenes in the movie. As he is going down in flames and it is too painful to watch, the camera mercifully and slowly pans away, focusing on the busy street outside as we can still hear the one way conversation. After he hangs up the phone his infatuation with Betsy is immediately over and he feels she has now become "cold and distant" and is "just like all the others."

    The director, Martin Scorsese, makes a cameo appearance as an unhappy and creepy fare that is stalking his cheating wife and plans to kill her for her infidelity. A young Peter Boyle has a small role as "Wizard" the street wise career cab driver who tries to console Travis with guidance and life philosophy when Travis (in his time of grief over losing Betsy) says to Wizard he wants to go out and "do bad things".



    "He called you a little piece of chicken."

    As Travis descends into madness, he once again encounters a child prostitute named "Easy", real name Iris, (played by a very young Jodie Foster) being used and exploited by a punk, street thug pimp (played by a very young Harvey Keitel). He tries to convince her that he will rescue her from her sordid life style. She is not interested.

    At the same time Travis plots to kill the Presidential candidate (that Betsy was working for). The fact that she jilted him seems the only reason he wants to do that. After a bizarre conversation between Travis and a secret service agent at a supporter rally followed by a failed assination attempt, he escapes into the crowd. Once back at home he begins to feel that his real purpose in life at this time is to rescue Iris from the clutches of the scum he detests even if she is unwilling.

    He illegally purchases many weapons, shaves his head into a Mohawk and sets out to administer justice, punishment, and do the "right thing" because "here is a man who stood up and wouldn't take it anymore".

    The ending was not unexpected but did have some surprising and thought provoking twists. The soundtrack is haunting and the cinematography is terrific. Overly bright neon lights sometimes seen through a rain washed windshield or cruising the grungy, seedy, skid row streets that show the color of blood brighter than anything is a tribute to Scorsese's ability to put us right in it.


    I have to agree with the American Film Institute that this is one of the best 100 films ever made. I think it is De Niro's best work followed by Goodfellas (also directed by Scorsese).
    ...more info
  • De Niro standing in front of the mirror practicing his insults ('You talking' to me?') is one of the landmarks of contemporary H
    The opening images of the yellow taxi cab moving slowly through clouds of steam, seems an authentic vision of the city as netherworld, a landscape of gaudy nightmares... Travis himself is an unnerving combination of psychopath and naive innocent, a victim whose attempts to put the World to Rights produce yet more victims...

    Like other troubled heroes of the era, Travis is an ex-Marine, working nights as a New York taxi driver, observing with increasing disgust the human flotsam that comes into his cab... His attempts at human contact are a failure... An icy political worker whom he takes on a date (Cybil Shepherd) is repelled by his taste of porno films... He tries to rescue Iris, a teenage hooker (Jodie Foster), but increasingly his mind is under tension, and, prevented in his attempt to assassinate a Presidential candidate, he murders Iris' pimp Sport (Harvey Keitel) and a client in an orgy of what he intends a redemptive violence...

    Scorsese's film: a study of urban alienation, and a restless, fluid camera contributed to a view of New York as hell on earth, and mirrored the protagonist's growing insanity... ...more info
  • Different take
    *Taxi Driver* is an excellent movie featuring superb acting by DeNiro, Foster, and Keitel. The cinematography is fantastic in that its combination of lighting and location sets perfectly the mood. The story is important in that it served as a warning when American society began changing drastically (i.e. nuclear familial breakdown) from the late 1960s - mid 1970s. Its ultimate message is correct in its asessment of spiritual isolation's consequences (as well as the results of unjustified violence).
    The movie, however, goes too far in its acceptance of youth exploitation. Keitel's character, a child's pimp, is portrayed as somewhat caring and paternal. As another reviewer noted, "he is not a monster." Such is dangerous acceptance (even if only intellectual for the movie's sake) of a vile practice which should never be tolerated under any circumstances.
    Anyone who abuses children in any way (especially sexually, physically, or emotionally) for any reason (especially in a rational way for financial gain) is nothing short of a monster. While vigilantism is also not acceptable, those who hurt children should be prosecuted to the fullest legal extent. They should never be portrayed as anything other than what they are; selfish, abusive, and cowardly.
    Foster's character portrayal has a serious flaw; while she is supposed to be 12 years old, she is actually depicted as an adult. This film would have viewers think Foster's character is not really being abused or exploited, as she independantly decided to begin prostituting herself. The film further implies that attempts to rescue her are in vain, as she has already lost her innocence and cannot return to a normal girl's life.
    That characterization fails to consider an extremely important premise; 12 year-old children do not have the maturity, experience, or soundness of judgement to decide they want to be prostitutes. Such is the entire basis for all minimum age laws (be they sexual consent, alcohol purchase/consumption, driving, or voting related). As children cannot rationally decide they want to be prostitutes, any adult who partakes of this activity in any way is an accomplice at the very least.
    Furthermore, not all those who want to help child victims are deranged lunatics looking for an excuse to shoot people or use violence. Helping the powerless is what being a good person is all about. This movie would have people believe anyone who wants to protect the innocent or offer a helping hand has serious psychological problems. How ridiculous!
    Finally, giving up on lost children is not the reasonable answer. While underage prostitutes will have obviously lost much innocence and will not be their pre-street selves if rescued, there is no excuse for allowing their continued abuse. Coal miners trapped for extended periods after cave-ins often must live with serious mental problems if rescued. Would it therefore make sense to argue they should not be rescued because they will not be their original happy selves?
    While this is a great movie, please watch it with the understanding that child prostitution is inherently abusive and should never be condoned....more info
  • stunning on many levels
    obviously one of the greatest movies ever, i had not seen it in years. enjoyable and informative extras. still i bought it for the haunting soundtrack, amazing story, and excellent acting...i am very pleased. ...more info
  • An Incredibly Thought Provoking And Groundbreaking Piece Of Cinema.
    One of the most cotroversial movies in cinema history, with an ending that has been analyzed by any and every true film scholar, Martin Scorsese's 1976 classic "Taxi Driver" is a masterpiece in every aspect. The themes of the film (delirium, insanity, isolation) have never been more deeply explored by any other film, the acting (in addition to De Niro's brilliant portrayal of Travis Bickle, everyone other actor involved in the film performs their best efforts, especially the [...] year old at the the time Jodie Foster), and the plot is genuinely disturbing and well developed.

    The special edition dvd comes loaded with a heap of extras, and the sound and picture quality are fantastic. I recommned this to all fans of great cinema....more info
  • De Niro standing in front of the mirror practicing his insults ('You talking' to me?') is one of the landmarks of contemporary H
    The opening images of the yellow taxi cab moving slowly through clouds of steam, seems an authentic vision of the city as netherworld, a landscape of gaudy nightmares... Travis himself is an unnerving combination of psychopath and naive innocent, a victim whose attempts to put the World to Rights produce yet more victims...

    Like other troubled heroes of the era, Travis is an ex-Marine, working nights as a New York taxi driver, observing with increasing disgust the human flotsam that comes into his cab... His attempts at human contact are a failure... An icy political worker whom he takes on a date (Cybil Shepherd) is repelled by his taste of porno films... He tries to rescue Iris, a teenage hooker (Jodie Foster), but increasingly his mind is under tension, and, prevented in his attempt to assassinate a Presidential candidate, he murders Iris' pimp Sport (Harvey Keitel) and a client in an orgy of what he intends a redemptive violence...

    Scorsese's film: a study of urban alienation, and a restless, fluid camera contributed to a view of New York as hell on earth, and mirrored the protagonist's growing insanity... ...more info
  • ARE YOU TALKIN' TO ME?
    You've got to have been in a coma for the past 30 years not to have seen this movie. Robert De Niro as Travis Bickle, the "troubled" cab driver is awesome and scary. Jodie Foster (Iris) is alarmingly sexy, Cybill Shepherd (Betsy) is dreamy, and Harvey Keitel (Sport) is the evil pimp. The big shoot-out towards the end of the film is an unforgettable "classic." Tension-building direction from Martin Scorsese. Robert De Niro - The Best. ...more info
  • Great Film Holds Up
    I saw this when released in 1976 - lines around the block in NY to see it on opening week. It scared the pants off me and after didn't want to get a cab in NY for some time. After seeing it again when it went to VHS, it still gave me chills, and again in DVD- it's a Scorsese master work of film and Robert Deniro about as weird and bone chilling as one can get. A great film for a cold night and a big bowl of popcorn; and lock the doors!!...more info
  • Shows Its Age Horribly
    This is one of those 70's flicks that meant to shock the audience, and it did...back then. "Taxi Driver" is slowly-paced, pondering at times, and very self-indulgent, in particular one scene in with Martin Scorsese stating how he's going to kill his cheating wife.
    There are more than dozen films better from this era, with better story lines, better acting and something more important to say....more info
  • Cinemapoetry
    Before Fight Club, before Blade Runner, before any of the nihilistic urban-decay movies there was Taxi Driver. I'm not going to lie- there's a lot about Taxi Driver that feels very '70s. But about halfway through the movie, in a scene with practically no dialogue, DeNiro and Scorsese supercede time period and genre to make what can only be described as movie poetry.

    DeNiro is perfect as Travis Bickle, a hyper-alienated borderline sociopath, a psycho who never noticed his descent into madness. He rides around the city all night, and as all his attempts at human connection fail, he obsessively looks for purity in a depraved world, first with a young political aid, later a 12-year old prostitute. The prostitute, Iris, is played with remarkable candour by a young Jodie Foster.

    Travis is simultaneously at home in the squalor of his city and violently disgusted by it. Does it change him into something human or something monstrous? There are no easy answers. But in the end, we are as taken with Travis as he is with his two loves. Taxi Driver is terrifying and fascinating, at times bizarrely funny, at times chilling, always brilliant. ...more info
  • God's lonely man.
    Watch Video Here: http://www.amazon.com/review/R3L3NWONJW31LX "I don't believe that one should devote his life to morbid self-attention, I believe that one should become a person like other people." -Travis Bickle

    The existential musings of an alienated man juxtaposed with that same man's contempt for the filth and corruption he sees all around him make up the heart and soul of "Taxi Driver". There are more memorable lines of dialogue in this film that speak of the truths of life than in some entire years' worth of Oscar fare. "You do a thing and that's what you are". Simple. Concise. Easy to understand. Irrefutably true. We are each nothing more than the sum of the things we have said and done. This is the meaning of life and it's in one throwaway line from a film filled with nearly two hours of genius. The setting of New York is so quintessentially American that this film would not have worked anywhere else. There is just something so instantly recognizable and identifiable about that city that every man, woman, and child in America feels like they've lived there even if (like me) they have never even been there. There simply is no other possible place for Travis Bickle to dwell and it is used to full effect in this film. Also of note is i9n the movie Cybill Shepherd's hotness. Her character's overreaction to porn speaks of serious issues, but I suppose when you're that gorgeous you can afford to be prudish.

    What most people remember from "Taxi Driver" is the legendary bit where DeNiro stands in front of a mirror and practices taunting an imaginary foe with the iconic line and mannerism that will never die, "You talkin' to me?". Influences of the film that I didn't mention in the video include numerous other musical references and homages in film and television. In an episode of the second season of the cult television series Code Monkeys (only first season on DVD so far) there was an episode called "My Pal Jodie" which mocked the controversy surrounding violent video game slike Grand Theft Auto by featuring a video game where you play as a man trying to kill a world leader known as "Ray-Gun" to win Jodie Foster's love. So 35 years later, "Taxi Driver" continues to inspire commentary on current events. If that is not a deep work of art, nothing is.

    This is a movie that will speak to anybody who's found society to be nearly irredeemable, but is still compelled to seek a connection to the people within it. Go get yourself "organizized", understand all that is you, and take it to the world at large in the way you see fit. This character's plan of action is contrary to my very nature and downright psychotic, but as a fictional person in a work of art, his rampage is inspiring in it's purity. Bickle's missions of choice are very different, but the same in that he seemed to seek to free the two women in his life from the thrall of two very different but in their own way powerful men. Travis may not have accomplished all of his goals in the movie or even consciously known what they were, but in his violent unfocused catharsis he does save the soul of young prostitute even as he abandons his own. And even doing so in brutal fashion, he at least gains the respect of a woman he loves but will never understand. Leave it to the media to turn a bloodbath into an act of heroism.

    The special features on this DVD include two commentaries, some great featurettes with Scorsese talking about his personal experiences, point of view, and goals when he made the film, and plenty more to delve into. It was a long time coming for this special edition, but I'm glad I waited.This is DeNiro's best film, and Scorsese's best film. Enough said. BUY IT! ...more info
  • God's lonely man.
    Watch Video Here: http://www.amazon.com/review/R3L3NWONJW31LX "I don't believe that one should devote his life to morbid self-attention, I believe that one should become a person like other people." -Travis Bickle

    The existential musings of an alienated man juxtaposed with that same man's contempt for the filth and corruption he sees all around him make up the heart and soul of "Taxi Driver". There are more memorable lines of dialogue in this film that speak of the truths of life than in some entire years' worth of Oscar fare. "You do a thing and that's what you are". Simple. Concise. Easy to understand. Irrefutably true. We are each nothing more than the sum of the things we have said and done. This is the meaning of life and it's in one throwaway line from a film filled with nearly two hours of genius. The setting of New York is so quintessentially American that this film would not have worked anywhere else. There is just something so instantly recognizable and identifiable about that city that every man, woman, and child in America feels like they've lived there even if (like me) they have never even been there. There simply is no other possible place for Travis Bickle to dwell and it is used to full effect in this film. Also of note is i9n the movie Cybill Shepherd's hotness. Her character's overreaction to porn speaks of serious issues, but I suppose when you're that gorgeous you can afford to be prudish.

    What most people remember from "Taxi Driver" is the legendary bit where DeNiro stands in front of a mirror and practices taunting an imaginary foe with the iconic line and mannerism that will never die, "You talkin' to me?". Influences of the film that I didn't mention in the video include numerous other musical references and homages in film and television. In an episode of the second season of the cult television series Code Monkeys (only first season on DVD so far) there was an episode called "My Pal Jodie" which mocked the controversy surrounding violent video game slike Grand Theft Auto by featuring a video game where you play as a man trying to kill a world leader known as "Ray-Gun" to win Jodie Foster's love. So 35 years later, "Taxi Driver" continues to inspire commentary on current events. If that is not a deep work of art, nothing is.

    This is a movie that will speak to anybody who's found society to be nearly irredeemable, but is still compelled to seek a connection to the people within it. Go get yourself "organizized", understand all that is you, and take it to the world at large in the way you see fit. This character's plan of action is contrary to my very nature and downright psychotic, but as a fictional person in a work of art, his rampage is inspiring in it's purity. Bickle's missions of choice are very different, but the same in that he seemed to seek to free the two women in his life from the thrall of two very different but in their own way powerful men. Travis may not have accomplished all of his goals in the movie or even consciously known what they were, but in his violent unfocused catharsis he does save the soul of young prostitute even as he abandons his own. And even doing so in brutal fashion, he at least gains the respect of a woman he loves but will never understand. Leave it to the media to turn a bloodbath into an act of heroism.

    The special features on this DVD include two commentaries, some great featurettes with Scorsese talking about his personal experiences, point of view, and goals when he made the film, and plenty more to delve into. It was a long time coming for this special edition, but I'm glad I waited.This is DeNiro's best film, and Scorsese's best film. Enough said. BUY IT! ...more info
  • Deniro defines "Punk" in a peace/love era!!!

    I trully love all of Martin Scorceses films. He in my opinion is the Godfather of Real films and Robert Deniro is probably the best actor. Togethor you got a powerhorse of ongoing masterpiece films worth buying to have. In Taxi Driver, Deniro I think symbolizes what you would call today a " Punk". Lonely and depressed, eventually leading up to his radical behavior; hence the mohawk he sports near the end of the flick. The year was 1976 and not many wore there hair in mohawks, but mainly long and hippyish. Peace and love was abundant, and Deniro represented the coming of time. Young and angst ridden at the pathetic society around him that never gave him any time of day. Wow, I can really identify with Travis in this movie. He finally gets himself some guns and in an ironic way ends up taking out a group of evildoers near the end, since he messed up on an assasination attempt. In Taxi Driver, there is no happy ending, but it is a very clever one that explores the mind of a lonely and trampled soul....more info
  • Terribly overrated
    Bad acting, lame story and very poor execution. It could have been good if carried out right but it moves too slowly. The dialogue doesn't make much sense and it's like Martin was just killing film time by having the actors talk slowly so they had less to write. Nothing brilliant about this film, 1/5...more info