Jane Eyre
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WARNING this book is not complete. It stops at Chapter 11 of 38. Orphaned into the household of her Aunt Reed at Gateshead, subject to the cruel regime at Lowood charity school, Jane Eyre nonetheless emerges unbroken in spirit and integrity. She takes up the post of governess at Thornfield, falls in love with Mr. Rochester, and discovers the impediment to their lawful marriage in a story that transcends melodrama to portray a woman's passionate search for a wider and richer life than Victorian society traditionally allowed. With a heroine full of yearning, the dangerous secrets she encounters, and the choices she finally makes, Charlotte Bronte's innovative and enduring romantic novel continues to engage and provoke readers.

Customer Reviews:

  • A Must-Read Classic
    It is a true classic of British literature. Charlotte Bronte paints a great story with very interesting characters. Even though some would say that is is boring to read all that detailed descriptions, long internal monologues, and difficult to understand dialogues, I have to say that these are the best part of the book. The dialogues are sparkling with humor and wit.It is very entertaining to read.The author follows the development of the characters throughout the story and offers many pedagogical and psychological theories concerning the human nature and its evolution.
    It is one of the best books I have read from this period and about this period. It beautifully describes the time the story took place. Next on my reading list are more stories by Bronte. I found one of the favorite classical authors. ...more info
  • Jane Eyre Audio CD
    It is really nice for traveling to "read" as you go, also it was nice for a busy daughter who had to read it for HS assignment!
    ...more info
  • I could not put this book down!
    I bought this book about 10 years ago, and I did not read it till last year, i could not put this book down, This book is so relevant to a woman's heart, to the human being's gemotions, What I love about Jane Is that she always kept fighting through all her trials and never let hate poison her heart, always made the best of everything. I bought the miniseries from BBC, I recommend Pride and prejudice and sense and sensibility by Jane Austen to those who love this genre.Nobody writes this way anymore!...more info
  • Reader, I finally read it and you should too.
    I've seen meritorious film adaptations of JANE EYRE but never got around to actually reading the book until now. What I found was a strong-willed story that moves like a high-speed freight-train even in some long-winded passages. In the tradition of the best 19th century English fiction, the book possesses a sharp social eye, tinkers with narrative technique for great effect, endows settings with a character all their own, and deploys verbal and dramatic irony with abandon. It tells a whopper of a romance between two extraordinary people from the perspective of the title character, who survives every kind of hardship life has to throw her way but who never loses herself, even when she falls for Mr. Wrong-and-Right-at-the-same-time.

    This book must have knocked the socks off early Victorian England. Our heroine goes to great lengths to establish that she and Mr. Wrong/Right do not conform to the beauty standards of their world, and yet they are most attractive characters. Jane insists on being the captain of her fate, no subserviance to men, not even the one she loves. Mr. Wrong/Right who is no angel is still sympathetic. Probably the most startling theme Bronte sounds countermands her generation's zeigeist: don't marry for money, security and respectability, go for the soulmate no matter the cost. This is pretty bold stuff for the daughter of a clergyman.

    I won't get into the plot because the danger of spoilers lies in every twist. I will say that one of its climatic points bequeathed me a nightmare, such is the writer's spell. The film adaptations by their very nature cannot convey the written voice and by necessity they must conflate some characters and events to accommodate the flow of action. Watch the Orson Welles or the recent PBS version, both of which are nifty, but don't substitute them for the book, especially if you have to write a book report or pass a test on it.

    ...more info
  • An enjoyable read
    Jane Eyre was a clever book that brought you through the twists and turns of her obscure life. Beginning from childhood, Jane was faced with the choices of life which lay before her. She moved from struggle to struggle with courage and self-determination which gained the reader's respect. Her character is strong and clever in a way that brings her to be a heroic personage in the novel. I liked how Jane obtained a strong-willed personality and how she stuck by her beliefs no matter what.

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this slower paced romance from beginning to end and like many other books of its kind, it captivated me with the beloved mixture of romance and challenge. I liked how there was a fair amount of lovey-dovey moments in the book which held your attention, and made you strive for more. It wasn't a constant shower of romance and flirtatious quotes, and this I found, allowed the reader to excite themselves whenever the romance was present.

    Charlotte Bront? used a lot of descriptive imagery throughout the novel ranging from the texture of light to the precise emotions Jane was feeling. This seemed to make it easier on many levels to comprehend exactly what was going on at every point of the novel. Although it had a few sluggish parts, I found was no struggle to read through those select scenes. The beginning of the book had a slow start, but I believe it was necessary to set up the stage for the rest of the novel. As a final comment, I'd like to simply state that I really enjoyed reading Jane Eyre.
    ...more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • This Particular Version
    I will leave the telling of Jane Eyre to some of the other reviewers. This particular version is my favorite. This is the cloth bound version or the book with the lovely attached ribbon bookmark. This is a very lovely version of this book....more info
  • "Dark and Twisty" As My Good Friend Would Say

    I really want to tell you what happens because I thought it was so good! But of course I won't because it would spoil it for you.

    I will say that I have been avoiding 'the classics' for a good long time (except for The Scarlet Letter which I actually enjoyed way back in High School). And I'm thinking maybe it's been a mistake. If only every book could be as wonderful as this one. I really loved it.

    My copy of Jane Eyre has an introduction by Joyce Carol Oats and I would caution those who don't know this story; do not read the introduction! It will spoil the story. Thankfully I didn't read it until after I finished the book and I am so glad, it tells everything that happens!

    Jane never forgets that she must love and respect herself first and foremost. She is clever, direct, honest and true to herself even when holding true to her principles costs her dearly.

    It is a gothic story, dark and heartbreaking full of love, devotion, obsession, isolation and oppression. Bronte creates a wonderful symmetry and balance within this story, I loved it, it moved me to tears.
    ...more info
  • It's a classic for a reason
    I'm amused to have been asked to review this by Amazon.com. The book is a classic, and a rip-roaring good read. This version also has a good introduction and helpful endnotes. And I like the cover....more info
  • A timeless Gothic masterpiece.
    Some modern readers may find it hard to believe that this little Gothic novel created quite the scandal in its day. The novel is based on an orphan by the name of Jane Eyre, who is raised by her aunt, the cold-hearted and cruel Mrs Reed. Jane's early childhood is one marked by violence and neglect. Early on, however, the readers learn that little Jane Eyre has a fiery spirit that refuses to become a victim of its oppressive enviroment. She boldly lashes out at those who mean to demean her and constantly remind of her station in life.

    When Jane fondest wish comes true, she leaves behind her wretched existence at Gateshead House and arrives at Lowood school. Jane's life at the orphan boarding school proves just as trying as her time at Gateshead. Behind the walls of Lowood, Jane suffers many privations and witnesses many acts of cruelty. She remains at Loowood for eight years, first as a pupil then as a teacher. Jane's urgent need for change prompts her to seek a position as a governess. She finds such a position at Thornfield Hall, the home of Edward Rochester, who the narrator falls deeply in love with.

    The character of Jane Eyre is extremely modern. Readers today will have little problem identifying with her thoughts and wishes. Although of low social standing, Jane speaks her mind to those who mean to subdue her. She reminds her aunt of her promise to look after her when she abuses her as a child. She defies the teachers at Lowood. She refuses to become Mr Rochester's mistress. Jane choses her own happiness over what is expected of her, not a very attractive quality in women in Victorian society, but one modern readers can sympathize with

    Charlotte Bronte used several personal life experiences as inspiration for this novel. Like Jane, Charlotte attended a boarding school, where she experienced many of the tribulations Jane suffered. The death of Helen Burns at Lowood from tuberculosis was inspired by the death of her sisters Elizabeth and Maria, at The Clergy Daughter's School from the same disease. Jane Eyre is one of the best classics. It's dark and tragic, yet emotional and even amusing at times. Definitely one of my favorites. ...more info
  • My All Time Favorite!
    This is the book that hooked me on reading! It has everything that I enjoy reading about: strong female characters, mysterious and preternatural occurrences, secret romances, and indelible love. ...more info
  • The Model for the Modern Historical Romance
    It seems silly to say that a book can affect you on a profound level. well I definitely believe in this power that a good book has. Jane Eyre is one of them. I cannot say that this was an easy book to read. But it was a book that I was very enriched by reading. Romance is a genre that is looked down on by many "sophisticated readers." Perhaps they would look down on Jane Eyre, but would probably get some eyebrows raised at them. Well Jane Eyre is the archetype for the romance novel. After having read thousands of them, I know a romance novel when I see it, and Jane Eyre does qualify. But it is much more than this. It's a story for the person who wonders why the keep trying to do the right thing, and persevering in life, instead of just taking what they want when they want it. If Jane Eyre had been that sort of person, she would not have gotten her happy ending. Instead, Jane walked away from the thing she wanted most in the world. She almost died doing what she felt in her heart was right. Had the story ended there, I probably would have detested this book. But it doesn't. We see Jane continue to grow and act as the phenomenal person that she was. Although often downtrodden, she is no meek mouse. She has a fighting spirit that keeps her going when others would have laid down and died. But despite being a fighter, she is not a user and abuser. It's hard at times for the difference to be clearly delineated. Well there is no question about Jane's level of strength and intregrity. Although it is made clear several times in this novel, that Jane is no beauty, her soul makes her a beautiful character. Beautiful in a more profound way.

    There are moments when you feel, how can one person suffer so? But taking the journey, you realize that all Jane's suffering had a purpose. It refined her into a woman who could look beneath and love what others could never love or understand. It made her the woman who could love and heal Rochester.

    At the same time, Rochester was made for Jane Eyre. He had searched his life for a woman like her, and made quite a few mistakes along the way. And out of love, he was able to let her go when he wanted to keep her. But she came back to him, when he needed her most.

    Rochester is the hero that formed the archetype for many of my favorites: tortured, scarred, dark, enigmatic, all of those things. Best of all, loving little, plain, ordinary Jane with a fundamental intensity that pours out of the pages of this book into my heart as a reader. Despite his lack of perfection, I could not love him more.

    Ah, how maudlin I sound. I can't help it. This book moved me to tears. Yet I smiled at the same time. I enjoyed the conversations between Rochester and Jane. There was a heat there, a passion. Yet this book is clean enough to read in Sunday school. That is grand romance. The journey so well expressed, that no sex scenes are needed. It's all there.

    This novel is also inspirational. Not preachy, in my opinion, but for a believer, one can definitely find spiritual messages in this book. About perseverance, about not wearying about doing good. About the profoundness of God's love. It's all there, but in a narrative that expertly showcases it, not preaching it.

    I feel I am failing to write the review I want to write for this book. The words do fail me. All I can say is that this book will always be a favorite of mine because of the way it touched my heart and challenged me.
    ...more info
  • Touching
    Jane Eyre / 0-451-52655-4

    Unlike many of the classics, which contain a superb message under vernacular that is sometimes hard for us to read, Jane Eyre still flows easily to our ears and eyes, and the plot is gripping and suspenseful.

    While Jane may seem, to our modern sensibilities, to be something of a weak heroine in her jealousy of her master's suitor, her insistence upon actual marriage in spite of the cruelty of the situtation, and her weak acceptance of her missionary suitor's almost vampiric leaching of her spirit (in spite of his own sisters' exhortations to stand up for herself, no less!), Jane is still a strong and modern female in light of the standards of her own day. Her bravery in taking up her post as governess in a strange land, her 'presumptuousness' in courting (or being courted) by her master, her daring in considering to be a missionary's wife, and her final decision to set out again in search of her lost love all point to a strength of will and character which would have made her character - at the time - to be quite 'mannish' indeed! We can admire Jane her strength and will, while marvelling happily at how far things have come, and wonder hopefully at how much farther they may yet go....more info
  • pain?
    if i had to say anything about jane it would be that she seems to revel in pain. the injustic of her childhood caused it i suppose or, perhaps, she was always that way. was rodchesters wife crazy before she was locked up? or did locking her up make her that way? well, jane seems to like to be in pain and rodchester seems to like to cause it, they make a happy pair. it was a dark book with a happy ever after, as happily ever after as a dark book can be.
    the book was interesting, clear and well written though something of a slow read....more info
  • Excellent rendition
    Amanda Root does an excellent job of bringing the story to life. She seems to truly understand the message Charlotte Bronte communicates in her superb dialogue. This is my favorite audio CD. Amanda Root's telling of the story does not sound like someone reading from a book, but rather like someone living a life. I highly recommend this audio book....more info
  • Worth the time!
    This book is wonderful! The beginning is a very slow read, but it picks up and is totally absorbing once you get a third through it. Once you've read it, the beginning is never dull, as many people say. Once you know the story, you'll enjoy the begininng to the full!...more info
  • Jane Eyre
    This is a beautiful love story about not so beautiful people. Which makes it even better. I really think it's one of the best books around in this genre. Some of the lines are priceless and the interaction between the two main characters is charming and yet painful at the same time. It's young love at it's very best. Bittersweet and oh so good....more info
  • "Jane Eyre" deserves its standing as a classic in English literature
    "Jane Eyre" is one of the world's best-loved classic novels for so many reasons.

    It's an exciting piece of feminist literature written at a time when feminist literature was little known and even more poorly accepted. That it is a semi-autobiographical novel written by a staunchly, independent female author who herself was struggling to survive by her own wits and means and stand on her own two feet makes the story all the more poignant and compelling. While it is a prime example of Gothic romance peppered with the typical fixtures of a Gothic novel - the spectral Thornfield manor that seems to attain a life of its own; the allusions to mythological characters such as ghosts and vampires; the uncanny timing of such weather phenomenon as lightning or a chilling, drenching downpour to accompany major events in the novel - it also breaks new ground in that it avoids some of the typical conventions of Victorian literature. And, finally, it is a piece of masterful story-telling built around larger than life characters that for over 150 years has enchanted readers of all ages and thrilled watchers of numerous television and movie adaptations.

    For those few of you that have yet to read this wonderful novel, the story can be summarized quickly enough. A dying father extracts a death bed promise from his sister to raise his infant daughter, Jane Eyre. The sister, a spiteful and mean spirited woman grows to hate the obligation that Jane represents and soon sends her away to a boarding school. (Did anyone else have flashbacks to Charles Dickens' Nicholas Nickleby when they were reading this portion of the novel?) In spite of the harsh mental and physical cruelty she endures at the hands of the school's administrator and its teachers, Jane survives to become a teacher at the school. Ultimately she leaves to seek her own way in the world and secures a position as governess in the household of Edward Fairfax Rochester.

    At this point, most readers will correctly guess that Jane and Mr Rochester fall in love with each other but to tell more of the story would be to spoil the effect of this magnificent novel for first time readers.

    Suffice it to say that Charlotte Bront? has woven an enthralling story into the exploration of a multiplicity of themes that will occupy students of the English language novel for decades to come - the interplay of self-respect, morality, conventional mores and religion; the effects of social standing and class discrimination; gender relations in a patriarchal staunchly male-dominated society; legal issues of the day that related to marriage, inheritance and ownership; contrasting extremes of religious zealotry as displayed by Brocklehurst's hypocritical Puritanism reflected against St John Rivers' obsessive but well-intentioned determination to spread Calvinist dogma as a missionary abroad.

    While many of these issues have clearly been relegated to the history of the 19th century, it's also a fact that much of the controversy that Bront? has so eloquently built into her characters' lives persist as issues into our own 21st century. Little wonder that "Jane Eyre" has such enduring power in the world of English literature!

    Highly recommended.

    Paul Weiss...more info
  • Wonderful!
    Jane Eyre is never a disappointment. Bronte really can touch your heart with the struggles of the main character. A woman in the post-modern era could have easily been in the same situation. Bronte put forth a completely time-less quality in this book. If you have the patience, it can keep you nailed to your seat!!...more info
  • In one word..."WOW" !!!
    Talk about a beautifully written book ! Written in the first person, the excellent writing of the author Charlotte Bronte is both beautiful to read and gripping in its story telling power.

    What I found of particular interest was the moral character of Ms Eyre. There is a sense of absolute honesty about her, an honesty both to herself and in her sense towards other people that makes her truly stand out. For instance, Jane went through extreme hardships to do what she thought was morally a right thing to do, including relinquishing her lover. And then, when she has barely come out of extreme poverty, she finds out that her rich Uncle has left her a lot of money. She shows her character here by willingly sharing her inheritance with her newly discovered cousins.

    And the way that she loves Rochester is simply too beautiful for me to describe here in words. Read the book, and let Charlotte Bronte describe it to you in her eloquent and heart rendering prose....more info
  • Great Content. A Bit Too Lengthy.
    Charlotte Bronte discusses one the most important issues we face today in our society--namely a girl's struggle to be loved but also to be socially and mentally independent. Jane Eyre is a lonely, miserable child, who finally becomes a happy, satisfied wife. She does so only after struggling and suffering as a child and later as a young woman. Although the content is very interesting for most, I believe that Bronte could have fitted it in 280 instead of 480 pages.

    Jane initially maintains her romantic relationships superficial since, according to her, they will result in her lack of independence. Jane's romances with Rochester and St. John are not essentially based on true love, and thus, do not flourish. Rochester is interested in Jane because of her intelligence and piano skills; however, Jane believes that the great social differences between her and Rochester make her unworthy of this relation. A marriage would mean abiding by a husband's orders and the household's chores, which definitely is not her connotation of love. Jane's undeveloped romantic relationships fortify her desire for independence and romance simultaneously.

    Only by becoming socially and economically equal to Rochester does Jane finally seek a deep, lasting romantic relationship, fulfilling Bronte's assertion that a rational balance between emotions and desires is required to become happy. Jane's acquaintance with her cousins provides her the emotional support she seeks throughout the novel. An added support is Jane's inheritance of her wealthy uncle, which makes her not only socially but also economically equal to Rochester. Now that Jane is economically, socially, and emotionally autonomous, she can accept Rochester's proposal.

    In Jane Eyre, Jane discovers the secret of having a happy life through rationally balancing her desires for independence and her emotions towards Rochester and St. John. Nowadays, many young women struggle to achieve this balance. Therefore, I greatly encourage any who face that same problem to read this book. Maybe you will find your solution in one of the pages....more info
  • Jane Eyre hardback edition
    The book is beautiful and all that I had hoped to receive. It is a wonderful addition to my classic book collection. Thank you. ...more info
  • illustrated ebook
    Jane Eyre - Illustrated novel by Charlotte Bronte

    This ebook is a golden treasure to add to your library. A beloved classic and remarkable work of literature....more info
  • "Destiny"
    There are many excellent books written about the human heart, but few writers master the artistry needed to combine both thought and dialog into a free flowing story that, filled with mystery and torment, capture the imagination as does Charlotte Bronte's tale of love and desire struggling upstream against the elements of life station, society's pressure, and mistakes made in youth that never lie in peace no matter how much time passes.

    Such is the novel Jane Eyre. I knew it was a Classic, and acknowledged it; I had seen several versions of the movies made of it, but did not recall having ever read the book as an adult. Written in 1847, it seemed something to watch on film, but not explore in the written word, as many such novels are difficult to read. Nothing could have been farther from the truth, and I was given an extraordinary literary experience once again by chance. It is particularly interesting given that this book was written by a woman at a time when license was thin; she managed not only to pull it off, but gave up nothing in the process while taking the reader to the smoldering destiny of what she intended to deliver.

    Jane Eyre is a hauntingly beautiful tale of a plain but highly mature and intelligent girl, shunned and unwanted by her family in her youth, much like the fairy tale of Cinderella. The reason for this travesty is finally delivered in the epilogue, yet it's integral importance yields completely to the unlikely romance that she finds as a result of it.

    She, frightened and alone but possessed of a courage and confidence that she will somehow prevail against her odds, is arranged a position as a governess for a mysterious, often absent gentleman of means who needs a tutor for his little girl. Upon arriving, she immediately senses there is a sinister intrigue surrounding the big house and it's inhabitants, but is too conscious of her place to be too inquisitive; beyond that, her sense of honor and integrity prevents any covert investigation on her part. But it is a place to flee from on occasion, and one night she leaves to send a letter out in the next town, which is a long walk through a dusky, cold winter's evening. There, on a lonely bridle path, she unwittingly meets the owner of the Estate, Edward Rochester - as he returns homeward, although in no glamorous way to be sure, as he has fallen off his horse and sprained his leg, all within her immediate vision. She come to his aid, helps him to his feet; and the first of the fateful encounters between a world-weary yet vital man and a much younger, guileless, yet very capable woman has come to be.

    The author waxes splendid in her descriptive paragraphs of the countryside and surroundings; of the morning mist shrouding the walks under the cherry trees in the old gardens surrounding the mansion; of moonlight shining in windows at night adding visuals as if by magic. But that's the periphery; the undercurrent of something else is running dark and deep. There is a secret hidden on the upper story, one that is closely guarded, yet threatens to expose itself continually, with the potential to destroy not only Mr. Rochester himself, but any chance for happiness he may decide to take.


    Rochester senses something out of the ordinary in the governess he has inherited by chance to educate and care for his child. The flighty little girl is the irritating and very tangible link to his past that brings him continual reminders of his "error" - yet has somehow been the vessel that brings about his emotional emancipation - through the hiring of Jane. And as Jane becomes acquainted with her benefactor, she realizes that despite his eccentricities, he is above other men in many, many ways, for even in her protected environment she has noticed his encouragement of equality for her; encouragement to speak her mind and reveal her thoughts to him. She is reluctant to do so, because she is wary of the differences in station between them, and realizes he has ultimate and enduring power over her. He cleverly attempts to seek out and determine ahead of time each of his moves toward his desires so that he may emerge to the next level unscathed.

    The idea flow is exquisite; articulate without a misstep anywhere in connecting her intricate plot with the characters and the moments that filter unerringly down to create the mood and the sensuality between the two unlikely lovers that are caught up in the vortex. The night the Gypsy arrives unbidden to the big house is a perfect example.The scene Jane endures with the "gypsy" in the parlor is truly one of a kind; I don't believe I have ever read anything quite it's equal for astonishing originality. The depth of emotional insight, passion, and fear of rejection and/or discovery is intensely woven into this particular part of the story in an unforgettable exchange of dialog and mental dueling; a subtle, ingenious breaking of barriers, of discovery without risk.

    Turn charlotte Bronte loose with word software on a computer with the literary license of today and one can't help but wonder just what form it would have taken. For certain though, it could not have been more masterfully written than was the "original."



    ...more info
  • A Visit With the Past
    Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte was our book club selection for this month. It is a book I had not read since I was in high school. Now I can't believe that at one time I plowed my way though the extravagant prose, it must have been because the selection of other romance books was limited.
    Our edition was large print, for which I was thankful and as a recommendation I'd suggest a condensed version.
    Writing style have changed since 1848, but one item of interest. Early in the book Miss Bronte describe the characteristics of the development of a serial killer as graphically as any modern thriller.
    Nash Black whose titles are available in Amazon Kindale editions.HaintsSins of the FathersWriting as a Small Business...more info
  • Jane Eyre The Classic Collection
    The Audio was great until I reached disk 14. This disk would not play, no matter what I tried. Very disappointing....more info
  • A guaranteed good read
    For all you out there who aren't very big fans of classical literature, I assure you that this book will not disappoint. This is a beautiful love story that isn't too hard to understand as far as classic books go, and is well worth the effort. ...more info
  • Please Skip Erica Jong's Intro!
    What can I say about this beautiful classic that hasn't already been said?
    My only word of caution: DO NOT READ THE INTRODUCTION if you've never read this book before. Ms. Jong feels the need to fill you in (spoil is more I like it) on several key details/events that any hungry reader would rather devour on their own. Skip her....more info
  • If you could rate this book negative stars, I would
    One of the worst books I have ever read in my entire life, Jane Eyre is an abomination to literature. It was extremely difficult to get through the book because not only was the plot an absolute bore, the characters also contributed to that boredom.

    After reading the book twice, trying to comprehend what was the point of the story, I still have yet to understand why Charlotte Bront? even bothered writing this book. From what I can interpret, Jane Eyre is a girl who is lonely and dejected but finds love in a man called Mr. Rochester. Everything that happened in the middle is not significant. The story is extremely boring because it is too sentimental, too dull (just like Jane Eyre), and too long for a story with that plot line. What the characters say or do have no lasting effect in the reader's memory- it just blows right by. The characters are basic and have superficial, unoriginal motives. They do not do anything exciting or significant to help add to the plot. I kept skipping pages or rereading the same stuff because each and every page seems identical content-wise. The entire book has absolutely no memorable moments, proving how insignificant the work of literature truly is. Reading the book is a world of pain.

    If you are thinking about picking up this book and reading, save yourself the time and money, and go read something else worthwhile.
    ...more info
  • It's not Austen or Emily Bronte, that's for sure.
    I guess I compared this book to Austen's Mansfield Park. The climax of the book happens too early. I was bored with most of the book, as it does not keep you entertained with clever dialog like Austen. It does not grip you as Wuthering Heights grips you and takes you in from the beginning.

    It is a great story, told with a boring type of writing style at times. I was bored with about the first third of the book. Only when she meets the master of the house and his odd personality does it become interesting. Gothic story telling at it's best, with a shocking climax.

    This is not my favorite Bronte book, nor my favorite Charlotte Bronte book. It is just plain boring in narrative at times. The overall story is a good one and that plain or ugly people fall in love and they are not all beautiful. That in the end, her lover pays a high price for what he's done and she is forgiving of him.

    It's a great ending and a great story, if you can get through a third of the book to enjoy the rest. It's too wordy to keep you on edge like Wuthering Heights, by her sister Emily. The hero of the book is not realistic to what men are really like. It's woman's version of what women would like a man to be.
    ...more info
  • touching
    I am inspired by Jane's reslove to stick to what she believes in, even when it is the most difficult thing to possibly do. this book is beautiful....more info
  • Gothic and Brilliant
    There is a reason this book has remained popular over the last 160 years. One, it is a fantastic novel written by a woman in the Victorian Era and two, it is on the surface, a romance. However, as the story unfolds, one comes to see the novel for what it really is: a Gothic ghost story. I recommend this book to everyone from age 7 to 70. A must read.

    ...more info
  • A CLASSIC with a capital "C"
    This CLASSIC with a capital "C" deserves every excellent review it has. I can't add anything that hasn't been said. So, I will give Bront? fans a couple of website links in Haworth where the Bront? sisters wrote. The parsonage (where the family lived, father was a parson) has been turned into a museum filled with Bront? artifacts, their little dresses (the sisters were under five feet tall), letters, and books.

    I don't know if AMAZON will allow me to include website links in this review. If the links are removed you can look them up on your own.

    Haworth is in West Yorkshire. It is approximately one hour from the Manchester airport. Website: www.haworth-village.org.uk

    The Bront? Family Parsonage Website: www.bronte.org.uk
    ...more info
  • this is what a romance should be...
    Anyone who has read Jane Eyre will be more than ready to assert that there is more to this novel than just a protracted love story. There's the issue of class boundaries, marriage, faith and religious zealotry, self-realization, the circumstance of women in Victorian times, and so on. But being a self-confessed simpering romantic, I have no choice but to focus on my favorite theme.

    I loved Jane most whenever she's in the company of Mr Rochester, or even when she's just thinking about him. Somehow, for me, she becomes quite fervent, feels more human and behaves more womanly. Plus, I loved the fact that the author fully expressed in words the love that Mr Rochester himself feels for our eccentric heroine--so passionate, in fact, that I think some readers may gag at the "syrupy-ness" of his avowals. Not for me though. In fact, I feel a sort of regret that such emotion from a male character is rarely encountered in romance novels nowadays.

    Though a bit rough for me to begin with, Jane Eyre, as both the novel and the woman, became engaging as the story progressed. Dark, emotional, often dialectic, at times drily humorous, this story is sure to be remembered for a long while....more info
  • A Well Written Governess Romance
    At first glance, this book seems like the story of a lower class woman winning the heart of a rich and of a higher tier man. However, there is much more to the book than just a passionate romance. In addition it has been linked to have influenced Henry James, the author of The Turn of the Screw, also about a governess falling in love, but with some messed up consequences... sorry for the tangent. Anyways, Jane Eyre really is good, as Charlotte Bronte mixes Gothic elements with romance and focuses on a dynamic character who undergoes a bildungsroman and matures at the end of the book.

    Set in London, England, a stereotypical place for love, Charlotte does well in establishing the imagery of the fire between Mr. Rochester and Jane. She constantly uses colors to set the mood and uses it to set off feelings. Mainly, she appeals to our sense of cold and hot, to paint Jane's emotions, it is wonderfully aesthetic and should be a good read to those who enjoys language.

    Not only is her plot above average, and her literary devices superior, she is able to meld the two together flawlessly for those who love to read for storyline and those who enjoy a good analysis on what they read. By now one should get the tone from me that Jane Eyre is not your average romance novel. It is more than that. It also speaks of moral responsibility. This centers around the two protagonists love, as Rochester is still married, and kept it hidden. When Jane finds out, she is caught in a dilemma between her principles and her feelings. Unable to figure out a compromise she runs away. Only when Rochester redeems himself by trying to rescue his wife from a fire is he then able to prove to Jane that he has changed and is a candidate for her love. Conveniently, his wife dies in the fire, and Rochester is left crippled, but not permanently. This represents his forgiveness; he has repented for his sins and is now able to be married. The story ends with their marriage and Jane Eyre's epilogue.

    Charlotte Bronte is a very good author, able to appeal to both kinds of readers. With her brilliant use of figurative language, making Jane's decisions seem ever more desperate, and diction, which contributes to the overall gothic mood of terror, most readers will be enchanted by her work. However, it is also this aspect that makes the book lack it's wow factor, because it appeals to both, it does has to divide it's attention between plot and device.

    I would recommend this to anyone who has not read the book yet, so what are you waiting for? Go get it!
    ...more info
  • An unconventional heroine
    In many ways, `Jane Eyre' can be seen as an autobiographical novel. Certainly, Charlotte Bronte drew on her experiences as both pupil and teacher in shaping the character of Jane Eyre. The story of Jane Eyre is a triumph of character and spirit over circumstance. Jane herself is depicted as small and plain and with an independent spirit. She believes, fundamentally, in equality and, absolutely, in the healing power of love.

    The story can be read on a number of different levels: as a triumph of `good' over `evil'; as a claim of a woman's independence; and as a love story. I have read it three different times over the past 40 years and have formed different impressions each time. Perhaps on a fourth read I may form another impression altogether different.

    `Jane Eyre' is a wonderful mixture of the conventional and the unconventional. Jane is a survivor who uses her strength of character to survive the adversities which form part of her life. Many of the views expressed through the characters had critics arguing about the relative morality of the work. Some of those debates would be viewed with astonishment through our late 20th and early 21st century eyes but in the context of the 19th century it was not accepted that women could be the equal of men.

    Charlotte Bronte wrote `Jane Eyre' in 1846, and it was accepted for publication in 1847. Charlotte outlived her younger sisters Emily and Anne and had a number of other novels published: each of her novels is worth reading.

    Jennifer Cameron-Smith
    ...more info
  • This Particular Version
    I will leave the telling of Jane Eyre to some of the other reviewers. This particular version is my favorite. This is the cloth bound version or the book with the lovely attached ribbon bookmark. This is a very lovely version of this book....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • this is what a romance should be...
    Anyone who has read Jane Eyre will be more than ready to assert that there is more to this novel than just a protracted love story. There's the issue of class boundaries, marriage, faith and religious zealotry, self-realization, the circumstance of women in Victorian times, and so on. But being a self-confessed simpering romantic, I have no choice but to focus on my favorite theme.

    I loved Jane most whenever she's in the company of Mr Rochester, or even when she's just thinking about him. Somehow, for me, she becomes quite fervent, feels more human and behaves more womanly. Plus, I loved the fact that the author fully expressed in words the love that Mr Rochester himself feels for our eccentric heroine--so passionate, in fact, that I think some readers may gag at the "syrupy-ness" of his avowals. Not for me though. In fact, I feel a sort of regret that such emotion from a male character is rarely encountered in romance novels nowadays.

    Though a bit rough for me to begin with, Jane Eyre, as both the novel and the woman, became engaging as the story progressed. Dark, emotional, often dialectic, at times drily humorous, this story is sure to be remembered for a long while....more info