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Unforgiven (Two-Disc Special Edition)
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Product Description

Clint Eastwood and Morgan Freeman play retired, down-on-their-luck outlaws who pick up their guns one last time to collect a bounty offered by the vengeful prostitutes of the remote Wyoming town of Big Whiskey. Richard Harris is an ill-fated interloper, a colorful killer-for-hire called English Bob. And Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Gene Hackman is the sly and brutal local sheriff whose brand of law enforcement ranges from unconventional to ruthless.

Winner of four Academy Awards, including best picture, director, supporting actor, and best editing, Clint Eastwood's 1992 masterpiece stands as one of the greatest and most thematically compelling Westerns ever made. "The movie summarized everything I feel about the Western," said Eastwood at the time of the film's release. "The moral is the concern with gunplay." To illustrate that theme, Eastwood stars as a retired, once-ruthless killer-turned-gentle-widower and hog farmer. He accepts one last bounty-hunter mission--to find the men who brutalized a prostitute--to help support his two motherless children. Joined by his former partner (Morgan Freeman) and a cocky greenhorn (Jaimz Woolvett), he takes on a corrupt sheriff (Oscar winner Gene Hackman) in a showdown that makes the viewer feel the full impact of violence and its corruption of the soul. Dedicated to Eastwood's mentors Sergio Leone and Don Siegel and featuring a colorful role for Richard Harris, it's arguably Eastwood's crowning directorial achievement. --Jeff Shannon

Winner of four Academy Awards, including best picture, director, supporting actor, and best editing, Clint Eastwood's 1992 masterpiece stands as one of the greatest and most thematically compelling Westerns ever made. "The movie summarized everything I feel about the Western," said Eastwood at the time of the film's release. "The moral is the concern with gunplay." To illustrate that theme, Eastwood stars as a retired, once-ruthless killer-turned-gentle-widower and hog farmer. He accepts one last bounty-hunter mission--to find the men who brutalized a prostitute--to help support his two motherless children. Joined by his former partner (Morgan Freeman) and a cocky greenhorn (Jaimz Woolvett), he takes on a corrupt sheriff (Oscar winner Gene Hackman) in a showdown that makes the viewer feel the full impact of violence and its corruption of the soul. Dedicated to Eastwood's mentors Sergio Leone and Don Siegel and featuring a colorful role for Richard Harris, it's arguably Eastwood's crowning directorial achievement. The digital video disc offers standard and widescreen formats and a remastered soundtrack. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews:

  • How the West was really won.
    Clint Eastwood takes his place beside Western film-making legends John Ford ("The Searchers") and Sam Peckinpah ("The Wild Bunch") with this classic. Eastwood, in effect, questions the genre that made him the way John Wayne and John Ford did in "The Searchers" (through gritty realism). A big question you're left with at the end is "Do these people(Europeans/Americans) really represent civilization or is there a bit more to the story?"
    Great cast but even greater approach in the storytelling. "Unforgiven" is unrelenting realism and that is messy. Witness -- clumsy and near-sighted cowboys, outhouse assassinations, moral ambiguity, guilt by association resulting in a man's death, killing prompts remorse (and sometimes not). Essentially, very weighty matters translated to the spaghetti Western (thus showing Old West more like it was than most such films dare depict to their jingoistic audiences).
    Eastwood parodies his "Pale Rider" character and the mythic man on the white horse through playing a domesticated gunslinger who can't properly mount his horse or stay on it that well. Gene Hackman plays the cruel yet personable and smiling sheriff who happens to be a lousy carpenter. Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris add to the exotic mix. Harris's British bounty hunter makes light of presidential assassinations, another example of the dark humor that pervades "Unforgiven." This film is not for laughs. "Blazin' Saddles" it ain't.
    Eastwood's character delivers one of American cinema's most memorable lines about living and killing. Don't miss it.


    ...more info
  • WTF Amazon?
    Am I the only one who has trouble posting reviews here?

    Excellent Blu-Ray!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!...more info
  • Great movie, great image!
    Of course i've seen Unforgiven at the time it was launched. That's precisely why I bought it now.
    It's really a great film to see many times and better now with the new tecnology HD DVD. ...more info
  • Excellent
    UNFORGIVEN

    **** Out of 5

    Release Date- August 7th, 1992

    Running Time- 131-Minutes

    Rating- R

    Screenplay- David Webb Peoples

    Director- Clint Eastwood

    Starring- Clint Eastwood, Morgan Freeman, Richard Harris, Frances Fisher, Jaimz Woolvett, Saul Rubinek, Anna Levine and Gene Hackman as Little Bill Daggett

    Unforgiven was Clint Eastwood's big return to the Western genre and is by considered by many as one of the all time greats of the genre and won four Academy Awards, which included best editing for Joel Cox, Gene Hackman for best supporting actor, best director for Eastwood and best picture and while Unforgiven is deserving of it's praise the movie isn't without it's flaws and quite honestly as much as I liked the movie it wouldn't make my top 5 Eastwood movies.

    The screenplay by David Webb Peoples is quite solid with some really great characters. Unforgiven does feature plenty of action, but the movie is driven more by the characters rather than the action. The characters are all mostly well written for, but some aren't as interesting as others. None of the characters are boring or anything, but some work better than others. The script is well thought out and works on pretty much every level

    Clint Eastwood won his first Oscar for Unforgiven and he delivers a very well made movie. As I stated even with the action, Unforgiven is much more driven by the characters and Eastwood does a great job at brining the script to life. His scenes are generally well paced and he delivers some great action, suspense and real life human emotions. The only problem I really had was the running time. I personally felt the 134-minute running time was a little overly long. While none of the scenes are filler scenes and they all add to the plot and to the characters I did feel a few minutes here and there could have been edited out and it wouldn't hurt the movie at all.

    But regardless Eastwood delivers an excellent movie and the final act was nothing short of brilliant. The suspense level is excellent and while the shoot outs don't drag out, but they aren't too brief either and while the whole movie was well done I think the final act is where Eastwood really shines as director.

    Besides directing and producing Clint Eastwood stars as William Munny and this might be the best character Eastwood has ever played or at least the most complex. The thing about Eastwood is he is a great actor in the sense that he's best known for that tough guy role and even in his lighter movies he still has that tough guy persona and you'll be hard pressed to find someone better at that role than Eastwood, but he doesn't have a lot of range as an actor. That isn't a knock against him since he's great at what he does, but in Unforgiven, Clint Eastwood shows more range than anything before or after this movie.

    William Munny was a cold blooded killer who once married changed his ways and is seeking a sort of redemption. He knows what he's done in the past and he knows it was wrong, but what's done is done and in many ways William Munny is a broken man since the death of his wife. William Munny may not be as cool and entertaining as say Dirty Harry, but like I said he is the most complex of all Eastwood's characters. There was a lot of depth to William Munny and Eastwood really delivers a performance of a lifetime. We've seen characters like this before, but Eastwood as director and actor manages to make it seem fresh and different. Clint was nominated for best actor, but lost out to Al Pacino for Scent of a Woman, but I personally feel of all the nominated actors that year Eastwood was by far the best with a very complex character.

    The supporting cast is excellent with Morgan Freeman as Ned Logan, who like Munny has done bad things in the past and is trying to put it behind him. Gene Hackman like always is great and was very deserving of his Oscar win, but I don't understand how Freeman wasn't nominated. Jaimz Woolvett as The Schofield Kid nearly steals the show as a wannabe gunslinger.

    Like I said Unforgiven is a great picture and it's one of those movies as I think back to I like it even more, but still wouldn't place it in my top 5 Eastwood flicks. Unforgiven though is a really complex movie with excellent characters and like I said Eastwood is great at what he does, but doesn't have a lot of range, but here he shows all that range and more. William Munny is truly a great character and despite any problems I had with Unforgiven it comes highly recommended to Eastwood and Western fans.

    The Blu-ray has excellent quality and makes the movie look like it was done recently and not in 1992. The extra features are great with some good behind the scenes, plus the documentary Eastwood on Eastwood, which is a must see for fans of the Iconic actor....more info
  • GREAT GIFR
    MY SON WANTED THIS FOR THE LONGEST TIME. HE IS SO HAPPY WITH IT. GREAT MOVIE....more info
  • The reality of the gunfighter
    To clarify, I do not own this particular DVD. This review concerns the movie itself. Plot elements are vaguely revealed in this review, so don't read it if you haven't seen the movie yet. There is a warning in the review before any potential spoilers are revealed.

    People have called this film many things, dull, plodding, what have you, but they do not understand the point of it. This film was never meant to be an action packed romp through a fictional western ideal.

    This film deals with real men, imagined, perhaps, but real in their plight and manner. Death is heavy subject matter, and this is perhaps one of the few movies that gets the point across. There are no heroes in Unforgiven. It is not a director's self indulgent pat on the back, either. This film is as good as anyone ever said it was, and is by far, the most relevant story of violence told on the silver screen. It is at times vulgar, distasteful, and flat out cold, but such was the life of this kind of man. This was the reality of the myth, and no punches are held in laying that fact out for the viewer to observe.

    After this point, I discuss plot.

    There is an evolution throughout the film, where the viewer tags alongside the main character. At first, he is innocuous, and one is lead to believe that perhaps the days are truly over, or maybe this man isn't so bad, after all. Throughout the film, the journey follows him, and his fellow riders, as he is laid low by the plot, forcing the viewer to identify with him slowly. You get to know his character as a man, as varied myths of the west are smashed to pieces in action and conversation around him. Throughout it all, there is talk by many characters of just what a real killer truly is.

    This man begins to grow on you, as others talk of killing, and even accomplish it, to their own ability. Mention is made of his devotion to his wife, and the viewer is left to identify further with him, and begin to really like him, before the bottom falls out, and the man reveals the true colors of such a legend, and the monster is revealed.

    The gunfight is sudden, and the killings are meant to shock. Things are presented things actually are in such a situation. The viewer watches as violence fuels this character to a bitter end for others, you can feel the adrenaline flowing in his veins as he steels himself after the fight, murdering the survivors and promising death to everyone who would oppose him, right on down the family line, starting with women and children.

    He knows the use of fear and blood, and you can see him slump away on his horse as the moment leaves him, riding not into a sunset, but into a dark, wet, cloudy night, rain dripping off of his hat, hoping to leave town before his spell wears off of them.

    This is a film about death, and the reality of death. It does not color over the harsh reality of the men we like to idolize. 5 men killed at the end of this film feels like 500, it weighs on you, if you let yourself be absorbed by it. This film does not idolize a gunfighter, it obsesses, it twists and writhes with the reality of the coldness and hate that is required of a killer, and the detached irrelevance of life after the act.

    If you only see one western film in your life, make it this one....more info
  • Great Film
    I bought the 2 disc version with alll the extra's on disc two. I haven't watch disc two yet. The movie disc played fine. sound and picture quality was good.

    I fell off the couch with laughter when Morgan Freeman asks Clint if he's gone to town for a woman after his wife died. Clint said he promised his wife he wouldn't pay for sex. Morgan Freeman then asks Clint, "Do you use your hand"?.............LOL.....Clint jsut glares at him....more info
  • A Western, One Last Time...
    Clint Eastwood revisited his movie cowboy roots one last time in 1992's highly acclaimed "Unforgiven." Eastwood directs and stars as one William Munny, retired gunman and formerly notorious killer, now in unsuccessful retirement as a pig-farming widower with two small children. The opportunity to make some money comes in the person of the Schofield Kid, a young, cocky, and inexperienced gunman wanna-be headed to Wyoming to collect the bounty for a revenge killing in the small town of Big Whiskey. Munny goes along, and recruits his former side-kick Ned Logan (played by Morgan Freeman), also retired.

    Big Whiskey is run by its tough-talking, preening sheriff, Little Bill Daggett, played with smooth menace by Gene Hackman. For Little Bill, the free ranging gunmen of an earlier era are meant to be a dying breed, and he runs out of town the first man who shows up to collect the revenge killing bounty (Richard Harris in a nice cameo).

    Munny, Logan, and the Schofield Kid reach Big Whiskey and promptly run afoul of the sheriff, who abuses a sick Munny and murders Logan, while the Kid discovers killing is not all it's cracked up to be in the dime novels. Munny will seek his revenge on Little Bill in a final, blazing gunfight in the middle of a thunderstorm.

    Eastwood purposely deglamorizes the Western myth. Big Whiskey is barely a muddy wide spot in the run, easily run by a bullying sheriff with a big ego, who tolerates prostitution and the abuse of the prostitutes by ranch hands. Munny and Logan are well past their prime; their killing of two ranch hands for the bounty money is painful in its ineptitude. Munny's final confrontation with Little Bill is fueled by whiskey and grief over Logan's death.

    Eastwood's direction is spare and straightforward. The dialogue is laconic but authentic to the period. The cast, beyond the headlining actors, does a nice job of portraying the dreams and struggles of people in a small place. This movie is highly recommended as a masterpiece of Eastwood's movie-making art and as perhaps his last look at the movie cowboy....more info
  • Amazing Transfer!!!
    I am sometimes befuddled by Blu-Ray, there are times when a recently released movies only looks so-so and then there are movies like UNFORGIVEN. Throughout the movie Leone's film savvy can be seen in Eastwood's directing style....the movies opening scene sets a mood. We, the audience, are caught in the rain (which by the way makes you want to grab a blanket and light up the fireplace), and almost immediatly start forming opinions about the key characters including Eastwood who plays a somewhat dark character. The movie is nicely placed with a very predictable but enjoyable plot. As for the Blu-Ray aspect it is a 10 with one exception the movie is so "bright" at times the characters seem to become a part, or "get lost" in the natural shadows. Not sure if that makes sense but you will know what I mean when you watch the movie. The audio is stellar if not exciteable...you will not need surround for this one. The final gunbattle is again dark and clint seems to have no contrast to his environment. This aside this is a must own as it was an instant classic the second it was released. ...more info
  • grim reality without humor.
    Not a fun western. Much brutishness and grimness. No wisecracking colorful sidekick to provide comic relief. No promising union of hero and maiden at the end. No pat on the back for riding the community of desperados or crooked big wheels. No indian conflicts, dramatic train or bank robberies, nor exciting gold strikes. No wagon train hoedowns nor other pleasant social events. No Mr. nice guy whose tough when he has to be. The women are all mindless abused plain-looking whores, not glamorous dance hall queens, and are ultimately responsible for all the violence in the film. This is a message film. The main point seems to be to present a more realistic picture of life and violence in the wild west than the typical western and to deglamorize shootouts and gunslingers. Another message is that alcohol(and by extension, some other psychoactive drugs) makes certain men violent or abusive. Eastwood's character was such a man.

    The plot surrounds conflicting ideas of the just punishment for the face slashing of a prostitute by a cowboy customer whose manhood she insulted. The saloon owner nearly decides to shoot the cowboy, but then decides to defer to the authority of the sheriff, "Little" Bill. Bill initially suggests a whipping as being appropriate for the cowboy and his friend, who helped hold down the prostitute. But this doesn't satisfy the Madam, who demands a public hanging. The saloon keeper now demands a fine, payable to him, for damage to his "property". Bill finally decides on a fine alone. The prostitutes are incredulous at this sentence. To them this says the legal system regards them as mere property, equivalent to slaves or horses. Most viewers would probably regard a death sentence as too harsh, but a fine as too light. Perhaps Little Bill's original suggestion of a whipping would have satisfied the prostitutes after they witnessed it and there would not have been any more violence connected with the incident. This "mistake" left the prostitutes as well as most of the other town's people unsatisfied, and would ultimately cost Bill his life. The prostitutes offered a bounty for the heads of the 2 cowboys so as to achieve their idea of justice, and this initiates the rest of the action of this film. In a broader application, the complications surrounding this incident serves as a warning that even domestic insults and assaults can sometimes result in a cascade of revenge and legalistic injuries, jailings and murders, sometimes involving people quite unrelated to the original incident.

    This film showcases the injustices and ambiguities of vigilante justice and its perpetrators. The reformed ex-gunslinger drunk(Eastwood), who initially took up his weapons again only to make some money to help support his children and to satisfy the revenge wishes of others, eventually tranforms himself temporarily into a drunk vigilante who murdered those not involved as well as those involved in the death of his long time partner. This is but one of several incidents of unjust killings(including at least one of the cowboys involved in the slashing).

    However, we have to balance this against the frequent shortcomings of legalistic justice, including the expenses involved, frequent mistakes, the influence of money, status, race and corruption, the frequent inability to identify, capture or convict perpetrators, the endless appeals and frequent dissatisfaction with sentences as too lenient or too harsh and being carried out far too long after the crime is comitted. Both have their pluses and minuses. The popularity of films where the hero eliminates the villain in a vigilante fashion suggests that vigilante justice, when done appropriately, is acceptable to many people and often preferable to legalized justice. However, the legal establishment is reluctant to legitimize it, except perhaps in self-defense cases, which are often subject to interpretation. It recognizes the gave dangers of too frequent use of vigilante justice, besides the fact that this seriously undermines its authority....more info
  • anamericancallederik
    Unforgiven was a pretty bad western but not as bad as Pale Rider. Again, Eastwood is given the perfect plot - a bad man turned good forced to return to his old ways for the want of money, the job, to kill two cattlemen who sliced up a prostitute's face. These old veterans, reluctantly, go back to their old ways after the girls of the cathouse put together a big enough "steak" to kill them. Again, the movie had too much talk and not enough action. The ending was an improvement, but by the time I got there I felt like I wasted my time. This movie did not merit the best picture Oscar Award. There are many other westerns that are far more deserving. If you liked: the Good the Bad and the Ugly, For a Few More Dollars, A Fist Full of Dollars, High Noon (Gary Cooper) or Stage Coach (John Wayne) do not watch this film unless you want to disappoint yourself. ...more info
  • The reality of the gunfighter
    To clarify, I do not own this particular DVD. This review concerns the movie itself. Plot elements are vaguely revealed in this review, so don't read it if you haven't seen the movie yet. There is a warning in the review before any potential spoilers are revealed.

    People have called this film many things, dull, plodding, what have you, but they do not understand the point of it. This film was never meant to be an action packed romp through a fictional western ideal.

    This film deals with real men, imagined, perhaps, but real in their plight and manner. Death is heavy subject matter, and this is perhaps one of the few movies that gets the point across. There are no heroes in Unforgiven. It is not a director's self indulgent pat on the back, either. This film is as good as anyone ever said it was, and is by far, the most relevant story of violence told on the silver screen. It is at times vulgar, distasteful, and flat out cold, but such was the life of this kind of man. This was the reality of the myth, and no punches are held in laying that fact out for the viewer to observe.

    After this point, I discuss plot.

    There is an evolution throughout the film, where the viewer tags alongside the main character. At first, he is innocuous, and one is lead to believe that perhaps the days are truly over, or maybe this man isn't so bad, after all. Throughout the film, the journey follows him, and his fellow riders, as he is laid low by the plot, forcing the viewer to identify with him slowly. You get to know his character as a man, as varied myths of the west are smashed to pieces in action and conversation around him. Throughout it all, there is talk by many characters of just what a real killer truly is.

    This man begins to grow on you, as others talk of killing, and even accomplish it, to their own ability. Mention is made of his devotion to his wife, and the viewer is left to identify further with him, and begin to really like him, before the bottom falls out, and the man reveals the true colors of such a legend, and the monster is revealed.

    The gunfight is sudden, and the killings are meant to shock. Things are presented things actually are in such a situation. The viewer watches as violence fuels this character to a bitter end for others, you can feel the adrenaline flowing in his veins as he steels himself after the fight, murdering the survivors and promising death to everyone who would oppose him, right on down the family line, starting with women and children.

    He knows the use of fear and blood, and you can see him slump away on his horse as the moment leaves him, riding not into a sunset, but into a dark, wet, cloudy night, rain dripping off of his hat, hoping to leave town before his spell wears off of them.

    This is a film about death, and the reality of death. It does not color over the harsh reality of the men we like to idolize. 5 men killed at the end of this film feels like 500, it weighs on you, if you let yourself be absorbed by it. This film does not idolize a gunfighter, it obsesses, it twists and writhes with the reality of the coldness and hate that is required of a killer, and the detached irrelevance of life after the act.

    If you only see one western film in your life, make it this one....more info
  • Clint Eastwood's LEGACY and GREATEST film!
    I believe that "Unforgiven" will be the film that Clint Eastwood will most be remembered for, and deservedly so. It was the first Western to show the ramifications and results of gratuitous violence. I think everbody knows by now that the scene toward the end of the film where Will Munny is alone with the Scofield Kid and he gives the "We all have it comin' kid" speech is the definitive moment of Clint Eastwood's entire career.

    I have always thought that Gene Hackman is Hollywood's GREATEST character actor. Here he gives his all-time GREATEST supporting performance and deservedly won the Oscar for it. Morgan Freeman is one of our GREAT actors and gives his usual flawless performance.

    I saw "Unforgiven" eight times back in 1992. Then it was still common to see a film numerous times in the theater. Today it is very different because a film will be released on DVD a few months after the theatrical release.

    I cannot recommend this movie enough. "Unforgiven" is one of the GREATEST Westerns ever made. I'm proud to say that Clint Eastwood is my all-time favorite actor and star. The #1 LEGEND in Hollywood.

    "It's a hell of a thing killin' a man. You take away all he's got, and all he's ever gonna have."

    "We all have it comin' kid"...more info
  • "It's a hell of a thing, killin' a man. Take away all he's got, and all he's ever gonna have."
    Unforgiven combines two major elements to make it the best Western ever made. First is its brutally realistic depiction of violence and killing in the Old West. Second is the situation of causing a reformed man to revisit the behavior of his past in order to survive.

    There are no glorious killings in Unforgiven. This movie lays to rest the notion of high-noon showdowns or fighting for honor. Executions, ambushes, and agonizing gut-wounds are the staple methods of attack. Alcohol, pride, and gold fuel most of the violence in the town of Big Whisky. Most of the scenes with violence are very one-sided, further lending credence to this film.

    The main character is almost certainly a wolf in sheep's clothing. Through the efforts of his late wife, he has been able to eliminate his psychopathic tendencies, fueled for the most part by alcohol. His sober days are blanched by regret and remorse over the people he has killed. He is for all intents and purposes an unsuccessful farmer out trying to collect a bounty. But when things go horribly wrong, he is forced to return to the behavior and actions of his past to survive. A simple man with an extraordinary past and consequently extraordinary abilities.
    ...more info
  • The attractive murderer
    "Unforgiven" certainly looks beautiful, especially in HD. And I admit it is a very good film with a lot of good points, perfect timing, excellent acting, good characters, the works. And it has a lot more nuance than westerns normally have.

    But I will contend that ultimately it still boils down to the same old thing: admiration for a killer.

    When William Munny, in the charismatic and handsome frame of Clint Eastwood, rides out of Big Whiskey in the end, saying that if anybody hurt the prostitutes for putting up the blood money, he will come back and kill everybody, there is pretty much not anybody watching who does not feel deep in his/her gut: "my god, there is a MAN!" You just can't help it, it's in our dark nature.

    And you can even see this excemplified in the admiring and longing looks given him by the writer fellow and by the prostitute with the scars, as they watch him leave.

    There is no way around it: it is gut-level admiration for a man who by his own admission has killed many innocent men, and women, and children, and who killed several more just minutes ago. And the film aims for it, it is where it gets its marketing power.

    I am shocked that I've been unable to find any other reviewers (professional or amateur) who really question this. It is not a "great wrong", but there's certainly nothing beautiful about it, and it needs to be recognized.

    In a documentary about Eastwood, the narrator says about Unforgiven: "the sherif has tortured and killed Will's best friend. He has no choice but vengeance." And that's the exact untruth to be uncovered. There is always a choice. Violence begets violence, and he who breaks the chain, wins.

    Don't get me wrong, I am not villainizing "the Clint" here. His hyper-violent movie characters are merely reflecting an important aspect of human nature. I'm just saying it's an aspect we'd do well to look at some more.

    Another way to express my problem with it: if you listen to the movie, it is clearly against violence. The characters say it many times. But if you look at the movie, it is clearly for it. The violence is presented in a way so it is enjoyable. A friend of mine said that the final big gun battle was "like an orgasm".

    By the way, I'm just watching the documentary about the film, and DW Peoples (the writer) does say that the reason people think it's an anti-violence movie is that most other movies are "pro-violence" in the sense that if it is the good guy doing it to the bad guy, it's OK. But that reality is more complex, and that it's often difficult to pinpoint who's the "good guy" and who's the "bad guy". Which I think is wise. You'll notice that each participant in a fight always thinks of himself as the good guy.

    I will concede that within the framework of a big, popular, Hollywood movie, this film is probably as far as we can currently go towards an anti-violence movie. If you'd made a movie like this and not made the violence seductive and aesthetic, it would instantly have lost 90% of its audience. At least. ...more info
  • HD DVD review...
    The movie is definately good. The tear for me is that I thought the story/plot isn't very deep. But...but...as a film, it was well done. I'm a sucker for visuals and this movie looked beautiful. I loved the intro and ending and the score and of course the great acting.

    Now, the HD-DVD is about as good as you can get it for a movie of its "age". It's not an old movie but not a super new one either. I loved the transfer and the actual landscapes looked amazing even at 56". Granted, dark shots have grain because that's the way film (even digital) works but when there's beautiful outdoors shots, this disc definately takes advantage of them. A great transfer unlike a few early bad ones I've seen out of the HD & BD camps....more info
  • Unforgiven Review
    Very good quality transfer to HD DVD. Lacking in sound quality somewhat, but i think this is exagerated by the sound reproduction from my Xbox 360 HD DVD. Fairly extensive extras, particularly if you are a Clint Eastwood fan and not just an admirer of the film. Well worth a buy....more info
  • Unforgotten
    There's not much to say. Great movie. I had it on VHS. I needed a clean version for my DVD collection. It a class of it's own....more info
  • 18 people gave this one star - bet they eat junk food
    This film is rather slow in its build up, but like a great meal which has had hours lavished over it, from firstly buying all the ingredients then spending hours over the stove mixing and cooking. You finally sit down to eat 'mmm mmm, that tastes so darn good' quarter of an hour later you've finished your meal and you feel content. Unforgiven works in a similar way, the film spends large amounts of time bringing the story together, then the climax is short, but it gets me every time, it is so exciting. The film sets to dispel the old myths of the west - regarding cold hearted killers, and the only real cold hearted son of a gun isn't that cold hearted afterall....more info
  • Eat it!
    This is a great western. With Clint and Gene at the helm on this one, nobody can deny the quality film that this movie became. I am an avid fan of Clint's and many other amazing western films and this is up there in the top ten. People who gave this film less than 5 stars do not know what a good film is...and can go on complaining about quality films because their bad taste blinds their senses and minds to the truth that is the greatness "Unforgiven". And truly you will not be forgiven for your bad taste.

    The vengeance is epic...true to old spaghetti westerns...this is a very good film.
    ...more info
  • Blu-ray does it right
    This movie is a classic, and I can confidently say that when I watched it on blu-ray for the first time, it was like really seeing the movie for the first time - like all the other times their had been a blur filter between me and the movie and now, viewing it on blu-ray, that blur filter had been removed.

    This should definately be a part of your collection, if for nothing else, just the quality of the video transfer demands it. Not to mention that it's an awesome movie!...more info
  • Great Film
    I bought the 2 disc version with alll the extra's on disc two. I haven't watch disc two yet. The movie disc played fine. sound and picture quality was good.

    I fell off the couch with laughter when Morgan Freeman asks Clint if he's gone to town for a woman after his wife died. Clint said he promised his wife he wouldn't pay for sex. Morgan Freeman then asks Clint, "Do you use your hand"?.............LOL.....Clint jsut glares at him....more info