The Web    www.100share.com    Google
 
"Love and Theft"
List Price: $13.98

Our Price: $6.41

You Save: $7.57 (54%)

 


Product Description

When we last left the ever-confounding saga that is Bob Dylan's now-superhuman recording career, he'd reunited with producer Daniel Lanois, with whom he cut 1997's Time Out of Mind, his most coherent and appealing collection in nearly a decade. Now the still-reigning prince of musical contrariety and potent wordplay is back with his most focused, well-played collection since 1989's Oh Mercy, another Lanois production. One listen to the fade-in of the opener "Tweedle Dee & Tweedle Dum" and it's clear that all Dylan's roadwork has shaped him and his band (including guitarist Charlie Sexton) into a mighty musical weapon. And while his craggy howl continues to resonate, it's the songs here that astonish. A sturdy midtempo melody makes "Mississippi" the equal of the best numbers on Time, which it was actually written for. He convincingly puts over the R&B swing (yes, swing) number "Summer Days." "Honest with Me" ("I'm not sorry for nuthin' I've done / I'm glad I fight, I only wished we'd won") is a driving rocker that packs a genuine punch. And the light, lounge-like "Bye and Bye" and the southland ramble "Floater (Too Much to Ask)" show extraordinary confidence. He's labeled these songs "blues-based," but in typical Dylan fashion what would promise to be the most overtly blues number here--"High Water (for Charlie Patton)"--sounds like a banjo-based gunfighter ballad. But then that's this artist's gift: confounding expectations. --Robert Baird

Customer Reviews:

  • Amongst my favorite Dylan albums....
    This album gets kind of lost between the masterful comeback Time Out of Mind and the recent, magnificent Modern Times, but it's just as good as those two albums, and it's a masterpiece on its own terms.

    It's probably Dylan's most eclectic album musicially. It's all over the place, with hard guitar driven rock (Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum, Honest with Me), hardcore blues (Lonesome Day Blues, Cry a While), swing (Summer Days), Hoagy Carmicael balladry (Bye and Bye, Moonlight, and Po' Boy), spooky blues (High Water and the closer Sugar Baby), and beautiful, moving ballads (Mississippi, Floater). Dylan's voice is pretty croaky here, but somehow it suits the material quite well, even on the lovely ballads like Floater and Mississippi. Mississippi is quite a beautiful song, a leftover from the Time Out of Mind album, but it fits here quite well. I love Summer Days. Hearing Dylan do a magnificent swing song (at 61, with his backing band going full tilt) is wonderful. Dylan's band here is arguably the best he's ever worked with. They're incredibly tight and intense throughout, showing their dexterity by playing in almost any style. The rockers (especially Honest With Me) really showcase the band at their peak.

    Lyrically, the album is quite silly at times, yet Dylan's sincerity really carries over such sentimental songs like Moonlight and Bye and Bye. Floater (Too Much to Ask) (great title) is one of Dylan's most unique and interesting ballads ever. It's awesome that Dylan keeps surprising himself, as well as us.

    This is amongst my favorite Dylan albums, as I break it out a lot. Musicially, it's his best and most varied, and lyrically, it's wonderful. ...more info
  • A Masterpiece ? Pretty Much.
    Hard to compare one Dylan release from the next. I have the majority of his studio work. I think I like the newer stuff even better than the old. If 'Love and Theft' is not a masterpiece, its very close. I'm in pure wonderment at times of the lyrical prowess of this recording, but then it is Dylan, so one should not be so surprised. But I still say 'Wow!', aint bobby so cool....more info
  • Dylan's Love Letter To The South
    I'm a big fan of Dylan as a performer, songwriter and musician. The production on this record is the best he's ever had (by conincidence, he twisted the knobs on this one). You have to lean in to listen to what's going on. The narratives go from external, describing something to the internal. One of the things Dylan has always done best is crib lines from old blues and hillbilly and British Isles tunes and illuminate them in a different context. The themes of this CD are regret, forgiveness all filtered through Dylan's interpretations of various native Southern musics without being hokey, obvious or lame. ...more info
  • Bob Is Back!
    I picked this up from Amazon after seeing Dylan in concert recently in Upstate NY. If you're a longtime Bob fan, you'll be glad to hear that the MAN IS BACK! Of course, you probably already knew that, but I digress...

    If you're new to Dylan, you won't be disappointed. This is as good a starting place as any.

    There isn't a bad track on this album (yes, I still call them albums...so sue me), and some of it is positively stunning. With clever lyrics and a kick-... backing band, you can't go wrong with this one....more info

  • Good fun
    I'd say this is one of Dylan's fluffiest albums yet lyrically, but it knows it's light. The music is wonderful. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe this is Dylan's longest running band. This album is a good sampling of what you'll hear musically at his shows these days....more info
  • out of the slump
    this album was good from beginning to end.it silenced the critics that hadnt shut up in years,he made a really good album ending his slump of so so albums.he segued from the hippie/folkster into the burned out genius we loved from the 60s only now it was the 90s.the album was an important bridge in his career and the most listenable album since nashville skyline.32 years earlier....more info
  • I Think this is Bob Dylan's Best
    My friends have talked about how Dylan sings somewhat like a honky tonker on this great album, but he also comes across as a crooner as well, especially on "Bye and Bye" and also on "Moonlight." He's a Jazz singing, upbeating performer too, just listen to "Summer Days" and "Lonesome Day Blues." He's a honky tonking gambler on "Poor Boy," a dirge singer, delivering lyrics stark and true on "Sugar Baby." Like always, Bob Dylan is so many things, on this album, just about his best record ever. I loved "Highway 61." Wept over "Blood on the Tracks." Rocked with "Infidels." But this, this is all those and more. I think maybe this is Bob Dylan's best....more info
  • self portrait as it should have been
    Diverse is the word springs to mind when listening to this. It's a burlesque show, with humour, sentiment, satire, nostalgia and flashes of personal heartfelt confession, all brought with a fervour seldom heard in these days of poses and distraction. Maybe overall it goes a little less deep than Time out of Mind (it compares to it like Desire to Blood on the Tracks or Basement Tapes to Blonde on Blonde), but it's much more direct, less abstract and musically infected with more genius, while sounding like an authentic Sun recording, clear and agile, a cutting edge on even the softest moments. Gone is the self pitying pessimism. Here's a man with a dark view on the world, but ready to fight and live, even able to feel pleasure and celebrating the old times before technocrats ruled the world, while bringing its bluesy fruits into the modern time. Mayby he had something like this in mind when he recorded the severely flawed Self Portrait, showing the spirit of America and its various influences on him, but only now, ripened and without the need to shed of his troublesome fans, he is capable of giving of this engaging beautiful introduction to his own heritage and teritory of the mind and soul. It's as if you hear the ghosts of Muddy Waters and Shakespeare in unison. When he performed live in the Netherlands last spring he sent a shiver through the crowds, sounding better than ever, in fact, almost everybody, even in the press, said they had seldom/never heard anything as good as this, and it's reflected in this gem....more info
  • [...]
    the music sounds like scratchy lomax recordings ....almost.
    pencil mustaches and white hats like hawkeye...the mood sets the tone for the whole album....poorboy reminds me of eating a sandwich on st charles and jackson in front of the vietnamese grocery, the clack of the tracks, hungover waiting for the sand laid rails to take me to antoines to clear the dishes of the swells while the arpeggio fades. charlie sexton was a wunderkind
    in the early eighties and played with dylan around shot of love.
    if bob does any wrong i dont know about it......more info
  • Yet another thumbs up!
    Probably my second fav Dylan to Blood on the Tracks, and his best work in a decade. Defintely a stronger, more eclectic and satisfying than the commendable Time out of Mind. Bob delves into rock, blues, country, r&b, swing, 1930s-40s standards, and everything else. A true folk album, Bob delivers his slice of americana, an amazing amalgam only a great artist can offer. Thanks for continueing to seek out new frontiers Bob!...more info
  • Just a song and dance man, y'know...
    Somewhere along the line I bought that old saw about Dylan as deep and meaningful, the voice of his generation, the most important American musician of the past 50 years and all that. Whether these images are true or not, they imply that the man has no sense of humor. This is a crock. In truth, he's been cracking jokes for years - he's one of the funniest men on record (sorry) - and few people noticed because they thought he was speaking from the right hand of God or something. Well, if this CD doesn't correct that impression I don't know what will - it's even got a knock-knock joke on it, for crying out loud. Above all, this music is fun.

    Not that it isn't serious, too - the Rolling Stones haven't sounded this good in years, and as for the cartoon stuff you hear on the radio these days, it isn't even within spitting distance of Dylan here. The lyrics, too, have weight - when not spewing atrocious puns, the words call up deep values and deep pain on cuts like "Sugar Baby" and "High Water". Even on such otherwise hysterical tunes as "Too Much to Ask" and "Summer Days," the old wisdom and lost love flash out from between the jokes.

    No, when I say "Love and Theft" is fun above all else, I'm talking about Dylan's attitude. It's himself he doesn't take seriously - he sings in every cheesy American style there is, from Tin Pan Alley to honky-tonk to minstrel show, in a truly astonishing busted-muffler croak. He's America's court jester, the national con man, charming and roguish and totally unreliable, an impression that his Rhett Butler moustache does nothing to offset. He looks like a river boat gambler getting ready to relieve you of your wallet and then have you tossed overboard, and he sounds like your crazy old uncle who can tell lies all night as long as you keep his glass filled.

    Let's face it, Bob Dylan could never sing, even in his prime. This, however, is just plain ridiculous. And the most surprising part is that, even with the voice of a vaguely untrustworthy bullfrog with heartburn, he still makes incredible music.

    Part of the reason for this is the fact that Dylan has evidently reached the point where he knows he can do whatever he likes, and he doesn't seem to care much whether people listen or not. He's always disavowed the notion that his music could provide a basis for one's life purpose, but despite the disavowal he often seemed very conscious of his role as a generational spokesman. On this album he's finally let that responsibility drop and started to have fun consistently, meaning be damned. Like he says here, "The future for me is already a thing of the past."

    My only complaint about Love and Theft is my complaint about most of Dylan's work, even his best. There's always the temptation to quote his best lines, and there are plenty of them here. Doing so fails to address the one frustrating thing about Dylan; too often, his lyrics sound like collections of maxims instead of cohesive stories or ideas. Once in awhile you listen to a Dylan song and say to yourself "That's profound - what the heck does it mean?"

    Sometimes this works and sometimes it doesn't. In his early career, Dylan's tendency toward that kind of fracturing in songs like "Desolation Row" worked partly because he functioned at a historical moment when the whole country seemed to be breaking apart and forming new shapes, so that fractured lyrics reflected what was going on at the time. He had great bands then, as well. Both of those forces are at work on "Love and Theft"; again we live in a fractured age, and again Dylan has a great band to play with. After all, these guys have been with him for months on the so-called Never-ending Tour and they respond to each other almost before anyone does anything, they're so in synch (pun intended). So, although it can be hard to follow the man's thoughts, the songs function very well indeed. Besides, Dylan sounds as relaxed as he would if he and the band were kicking back on the porch, and who expects cohesion at a time like that?

    Over the course of a long career, Dylan has proved that truly great art comes from practicing hard and then taking it easy. It's a hard lesson to learn and a harder truth to believe, but actually Dylan knew it all along. Back in the 60's some interviewer asked Dylan if he considered himself more of a rock singer or a folk singer, and he said "Oh, I consider myself more of a song and dance man, y'know." Pressed for an explanation, he said "Oh, I don't think we have time to go into that right now." Obviously not; it's taken him about 35 years to go into it, and "Love and Theft" is the result.

    Benshlomo says, The truly great ones make it look like fun....more info

  • A Great Record that was Overshadowed on its Release Day
    This record came out on September 11, 2001 and as good as it is, it's release was probably overshadowed by something else that happened on that horrible day. Vesta and I were in the Caribbean, living on a sailboat at the time. We were at the Yachting Association in Trinidad, at the bar, drinking coffee when we saw it all unfold on the bar's outdoor TV. In no time the place was packet with foreign sailors and locals.

    I couldn't have gotten the record that day anyway, but did get if a few days later as my Dylan loving friend in New Orleans FedExed it to me. And I have to saw I listened to it a lot back then. We'd tune into the BBC, here about the awful events unfolding in New York and when we couldn't take it anymore we'd listen to three or four songs on this album, then it was back to the BBC.

    This is a worthy successor to Time Out of Mind and seems to pick up where Time leaves off. The music is outstanding, has both a jazzy and big band, good time, bluzy feel to it that only Dylan could put together. "Higher Water" for Charley Patton" is simply an outstanding song and "Po' Boy" really gets my feet a tappin'. This, like Time Out of Mind is one of Bob Dylan's best records and that's really saying something. Around so long and still getting better....more info
  • This Fun Album Rocks in the Right Places
    What a revelation. I anticipated I'd dislike this album and expected it to be too twangy or too hard or too overreaching. Instead, this mid-rocking album highlights its country roots in a fun way. You can tell Dylan is having a ball and it sounds that way on every song. It's infectious. It's always interesting to hear skill on display. A great disk to have in the car....more info
  • self portrait as it should have been
    Diverse is the word springs to mind when listening to this. It's a burlesque show, with humour, sentiment, satire, nostalgia and flashes of personal heartfelt confession, all brought with a fervour seldom heard in these days of poses and distraction. Maybe overall it goes a little less deep than Time out of Mind (it compares to it like Desire to Blood on the Tracks or Basement Tapes to Blonde on Blonde), but it's much more direct, less abstract and musically infected with more genius, while sounding like an authentic Sun recording, clear and agile, a cutting edge on even the softest moments. Gone is the self pitying pessimism. Here's a man with a dark view on the world, but ready to fight and live, even able to feel pleasure and celebrating the old times before technocrats ruled the world, while bringing its bluesy fruits into the modern time. Mayby he had something like this in mind when he recorded the severely flawed Self Portrait, showing the spirit of America and its various influences on him, but only now, ripened and without the need to shed of his troublesome fans, he is capable of giving of this engaging beautiful introduction to his own heritage and teritory of the mind and soul. It's as if you hear the ghosts of Muddy Waters and Shakespeare in unison. When he performed live in the Netherlands last spring he sent a shiver through the crowds, sounding better than ever, in fact, almost everybody, even in the press, said they had seldom/never heard anything as good as this, and it's reflected in this gem....more info
  • Really Great
    This CD is fantastic. My favorite song is Summer Days. They're
    all great songs. Dylan is one of the best. I recommend Tom Petty's The Last D.J. when it's available....more info
  • Is this Bob's masterpiece?
    This could be the greatest album of all 43. 'Nuff said....more info
  • Au Revoir, Lanois
    This is a very fitting "corrective" to Dylan's mixed experience with Danny Lanois and his black boxes and Acadian sonic shaman act. Dylan went on the road, sharpened his chops and then recorded a straightforward barn-burner. Every cut has its own charms but my favorites are Lonesome Day Blues, High Water (a prescient Katrina ditty?) and Moonlight. Dylan sounds courtly and world-weary and right at home in the clean, buzzing mix. High times. ...more info
  • Buy this album
    This is a beautiful album. Be sure to read the poems (lyrics) at bobdylan.com....more info
  • Best Bob since Blonde on Blonde
    When this album came out, I cried. My 13 year old son doesn't get it, he's more 'N Sync. But the music took me back to being a kid in the 50s, listening to Hank Williams and Buddy Holly. I really didn't think ol' Bob had music like this in him anymore. Listen to "Summer Days" or "Highwater." The fiddle/violin on "Floater." This goes way beyond that "wild mercury sound" he had going for him back in 1966. This is beautiful, man....more info
  • He never stopped and he probably never will...
    Dylan, always fascinatingly elusive, threw his fans another curveball by recently releasing two highly acclaimed albums in a row. Both 1997's "Time Out of Mind" and this album had critics collectively hailing that "the guy still has it!" And this long after the age that many rock stars sputter into embarrassing self parody. The eponymous Dylan, 60 years old at the time of this release, appears to have harbored no delusions or illusions of granduer. Not that anyone could blame him if he did. Over the last 40 years many have foisted titles such as "genius", "God", "messiah", "saviour", and "the voice of his generation" upon him against his wishes. Dylan never seemed to believe the hyperboles. Sometime in the 1960s he elicited horror from fans by simply walking out of "the scene".

    Many thought he was through, and many kept thinking that year after year, decade after decade. He didn't go away. He still hasn't. Even though he admitted in a Minnesota Public Radio interview that he thinks about giving up "every day", somehow he trudges on. He survived going electric, drug use, having his neck broken, an infamous "Christian phase", professional malaise, a smattering of uninspired releases, a cigarette drenched raspy voice, a potentially fatal heart condition, entertaining Pope John Paul II, and a lifelong hounding from the media and fans. After all that, the humor that pervades this 2001 release comes as a shock. And he's still going.

    "Love And Theft" traipses all over the American musical landscape. The styles range from hard rock, blues, swing, mellow crooning, and banjo-soaked western. "Tweedle Dum & Tweedle Dee" opens the album with a dramatic fade-in. Are those two surreal characters politicians, businessmen, hypocritical religious types? Dylan growls that "Tweedle-dee Dee is a lowdown, sorry old man / Tweedle-dee Dum, he'll stab you where you stand". "Mississippi", a Dylan classic, gets sung from the perspective of an outsider who is "Feeling like a stranger that nobody sees." Apparently this person has walked into a precarious situation and bemoans that he has "Stayed in Mississippi a day too long". Words of alienation weave in and out of the lovely melody. And on the line "thoughts so sublime" Dylan sardonically inflects his voice (self-referential?). This song will doubtless remain among Dylan's best. The album then takes a jolting upbeat turn with "Summer Days". Full frontal swing kicks in and Dylan and his band pull it off with surprising gusto. The lyrics refer to a "worn out star" who claims that "I know a place where there's still something goin' on". "Bye and Bye" introduces the crooning phase before the hard edged "Lonesome Day Blues" kicks in. Then the askew violins introduce the bouncy "Floater" and the hilarious line "I'm in love with my second cousin". "High Water" (dedicated to the alleged "King of the Delta Blues") brings a rolling banjo into the mix (as well as a bizarre request to "throw your panties overboard"). Some of the themes that Dylan explored on "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" get reexamined here but with some speckles of dry humor. The remainder of the album alternates between crooning and blues rock until the ominous chords of "Sugar Baby" chime. This song's chorus, "Sugar Baby get on down the road / You ain't got no brains, no how / You went years without me / Might as well keep going now" continues to resonate and haunt well after the album ends. Dylan had previously reinvented himself album to album or phase to phase, but here he appears to reinvent himself song by song. He takes on a cornucopia of styles and personas in a mere twelve song cycle. And he realy sounds like he's enjoying himself for the first time in years (maybe even since the "Boo Wilbury" days).

    "Love And Theft", Dylan's 37th album depending on how one counts, was released, on, of all days, September 11th, 2001, to enthusiastic critical acclaim. Though we now know that it won't be his last album, it nonetheless showcases his inexorable staying power. Following up the mighty "Time Out of Mind" wasn't an easy task, but somehow he pulled it off. And he managed to have some fun along the way. Having helped define the twentieth century, "Love And Theft" brings Dylan officially into the twenty-first. Only one thing remains certain: Dylan will keep going until he no longer can....more info
  • Two Great Songs
    Mississippi and Sugar Baby are great songs, up there with the best Dylan has done. However, the rest of the album, while listenable, isn't all that memorable. Still, I suppose it's amazing that he can still produce a couple of great songs still, after over 40 years performing and recording. The same cannot be said for '60s peers like Paul McCartney or the Stones.
    Overall, Time Out of Mind was better, although that too was a little overrated, with only Not Dark Yet, Standing in the Doorway and Trying to Get to Heaven truly belonging to the canon of great Bob songs.
    ...more info
  • Best album of 2001
    Dylan amazes me every day that I am alive. What lyrics, what melodies, what songs! Every song on this album is unforgettable. Just listen to "Floater" and the violin used in that song, amazing! "Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum" is very similar to "Times Have Changed" from the Wonder Boys soundtrack. He again sings "Mississippi" and does a cover of the bluegrass romp, "Highwater." What else can I say about this album? A clear masterpiece that measures up to his finest....more info
  • How many masterpieces is one man allowed?
    After listening to this CD for four years, I stick with my initial reaction: it ranks up there with "Bringing It All Back Home,""Highway 61 Revisited" and "Blood on the Tracks." Which is to say it's one of the all-time great rock albums. If the songwriting is not quite as consistently strong as his earlier work, the performances and production values certainly are.

    "Time Out of Mind" was a confessional album harking back to "Blood on the Tracks" (in mood if not in delivery), but "Love and Theft" both swings and thumps. It can be wryly humorous or weightily prophetic, more in keeping with the underrated "Infidels." Who besides Dylan could summon up the authority to deliver lines like "I'm gonna stand undefeated, I'm gonna speak to the crowd,/I'm gonna teach peace to the conquered, I'm gonna tame the proud" and not sound daft? That's from "Lonesome Day Blues," one of the thumping highlights. Another is "Honest With Me," with an irresistible guitar riff by the great Charlie Sexton. These rockers are interspersed with swingers like "Mississippi" and "Moonlight." Kicking off the album is one of the in-betweeners, "Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-Dee," which sets up the ferocious energy of the CD but also its knife-edge irony.

    And to those people who say Dylan's voice sounds horrible? Just go back to your "American Idol" rehashes and have a ball. The man has never been in better voice. Sure he can't hit the high notes anymore, but he doesn't need to - that aging croak commands the full range of human emotion.

    What we have here is an aging artist who's having a lot of fun, who answers to noone, and who knows how to help others make him sound good. Feast on it!...more info
  • The game is the same, it's just up on a different level
    I bought "Love and Theft" back when it first came out, listened to it a few times, but never really got into it. I think that may be because I had mostly listened to Dylan's earlier material such as Blonde on Blonde and Highway 61 Revisited and wasn't quite used to his "older voice". It's a voice that you may have to warm up to. On his recent records, Dylan certainly doesn't have the vocal range that he used to. But his singing style certainly accommodates it.

    Recently, I've been on a Dylan binge so I pulled out Love and Theft again along with Time out of Mind. Hearing it for the first time in a few years was almost as if I'd never heard it before. Now, I can't get enough of this album! It's a warm, funny, delightful and rocking album like none other Dylan has ever recorded. Dylan assembled what is probably his best backing band ever (no slight to The Band intended) and produced an album with really memorable tunes. Whether playing blues, jazz or rock the band is always excellent. The songs are some of the best that Dylan has written in the past twenty years. Mississippi may be one of Dylan's finest songs ever.

    "Got nothing for you, I had nothing before
    Don't even have anything for myself anymore
    Sky full of fire, pain pouring down
    Nothing you can sell me, I'll see you around"

    It's one of the few downbeat songs on the album, which makes sense since it was actually written for Time out of Mind, a rather gloomy downbeat record. Summer Days is probably the closest thing to jazz that Dylan has ever done. Bye and Bye is (mostly) a sweet, simple love song. ("I'm singin' love's praises with sugar-coated rhyme.") Floater (Too Much To Ask) is one of my favorite songs on the album. It's kind of jazzy, but features an interesting violin "riff" too. High Water (For Charlie Patton) is also a highlight. My two favorite songs on the album are probably Honest With Me and Po' Boy. I think Po' Boy is one of the best songs Dylan has ever written. It's one of his brightest, most joyous, humorous songs ever. Cry A While is a great blues song, with great guitar playing from (I think) Charlie Sexton.

    In all, Love and Theft is an excellent album. Musically, it may be Dylan's best. His band is excellent, and the songs are some of the most melodic that he's ever recorded. The lyrics are excellent as always, and there are many memorable lines that will stick in your mind. The only thing that might be an obstacle is Dylan's gravelly voice. However, you pretty much have to appreciate his voice to be a Dylan fan in the first place, so that shouldn't be an issue. I would highly recommend Love and Theft to anyone who wants the best of Dylan's recent recording work. ...more info
  • His Worse Ever
    We are used to Dylan pleasing us, and disappointing us. Vearing off into rock, which proved OK, then religion, some good songs, and his disappointments of, mostly, the eighties. Now this. To me a total flop, a complete sellout. Nothing original here. Only echos of his good old self and, this hurts, pop. If it wasn't Dylan, you'd puke. Because it's Dylan, there is only pain.

    pepe nero...more info
  • A miracle
    I hadn't listened to Dylan since he went Christian in the '70s, but I picked this one up because I needed something to listen to on a long cross-country drive.

    Wow!

    No way I thought the ol' boy still had something this bright, funny and energetic in him. Some of it rocks the blues like Blonde On Blonde, some of it is Tin Pan Alley with Dylan's unique lyrical touch and all of it is wonderfully arranged and produced. The backing players are superb.

    Great album. If you haven't listened to Dylan in a while, get it....more info
  • Two of his best CDs/Albums in over 30 years
    "Time out of Mind" and "Love and Theft" are definitely two of Dylan's best albums in a long, long time.

    As far as I am concerned, you can skip almost everything Dylan did between "Blood on the Tracks" and "Time out of Mind" (1975-1998) except a few tracks and not miss anything worthwhile. For that matter skip most of what he did between "Blonde on Blonde" and "Blood on the Tracks" (1967-1975). But 1998 was truly the year Dylan reinvented himself again and by 2001 he was taking it to another level. It will be nice to see how well "Modern Times" stands up to the last 2 albums. ...more info