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I'll Cry Tomorrow [VHS]
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Product Description

Susan Hayward has a signature role in I'll Cry Tomorrow, a pedal-to-the-metal look at the troubled times of singer Lillian Roth. Hayward snagged her fourth Oscar nomination for the part, which takes Roth from humble beginnings through great stardom and finally into a hell of alcoholism and recovery. The movie delivers on a couple of tendencies of its era (1956): a fresh frankness about addiction (The Man with the Golden Arm had come out the year before), plus some handy psychoanalyzing of the heroine--in this case, Roth's problems are laid at the feet of her pushy stage mother (Jo Van Fleet). With all the sturm und drang, there's not a lot of room for songs, but we do get to hear vintage tunes such as "Sing You Sinners" and "When the Red, Red, Robin Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along." Hayward does her own singing, and she can best be described as a belter rather than a singer ("belter" describes her acting style, too). Also in the cast, portraying the men at various stages of Roth's life, are Ray Danton, Eddie Albert, and Richard Conte (trailing the aura of violent noir behind him); Daniel Mann directed, just after his duties on The Rose Tattoo. It's a slice of Fifties melodrama, the kind that hasn't aged particularly well, but if you appreciate Hayward's customary pull-it-from-the-guts style, you'll be engrossed. --Robert Horton

Customer Reviews:

  • Superior drama!
    Based on Lilian's Roth story on her days and her terrible fight against this awful disease. Hayward one of my favorite in any age has never been better and her match with Jo Van Fleet as her mother make of this film an absolute must for all the hard fans of the cinema.
    Consider this quartet as the most remarkable exponents of the alcoholism ever made: together with Days of wine and roses, Under the volcano and Ironweed.

    ...more info
  • I'll Cry Tomorrow
    For Susan Hayward fans, this movie is a must. In terms of her performance I rate her 10 out of 10. Excellent supporting cast. Very good production and wonderful music. It is a movie that tugs at the heart. Overall a 6 tissue box rating. ...more info
  • Powerful and worthy of an Oscar for Hayward
    Susan Hayward and Jo Van Fleet both should have won Oscars for their roles in "I'll Cry Tomorrow." Hayward was absolutely astounding and Van Fleet was excellent in her role as the overly ambitious mother. I had no idea Hayward was such an excellent actress! She is the second person, (next to Judy Garland for her role in "A Star Is Born)" who was robbed of their awards. I don't know who won the year Hayward was nominated, but I'm convinced she performed a performance almost impossible to beat! It left me speechless....more info
  • True Boozehound
    I really do believe this is a true and harrowing account of an alcoholic woman, Lillian Roth. They put everything in the movie they could in the 50s. I read her book I'll Cry Tomorrow. In the book she went through even worse than what is shown in the movie. Alcoholism ruined her career as a singer and actress in the 30s and 40s. She never completely recovered what could have been a brillant career but at least she conquered alcoholism and was able to live a reasonably happy life. Susan Hayward is brillant, a no-nonsense, nitty-gritty actress who brings the heroine of the story to painful, real life. This is a disease which could easily happen to a lot of people who never think it could. It shows very clearly the progression from the first drink to irresponsible drinking to that first miserable drink she didn't want but had to have and the horror that followed. This disease can put a person in a very vulnerable position where they can be easily abused by others who pretend to help. This is a must-see for people who even think they might have a problem!...more info
  • This Movie Should of Been Named I Want To Live!
    This movie by far was the greatest, I love Susan Hayward, and she's a brilliant actress, she up there with Bette Davis, she really puts her all in this, while filming this movie she was going through hard times so a lot of her emotions are visible in this movie, and that's what makes this movie great. This is a most have to sit at home and watch on a Saturday Night. Basically, it tells the story of what a lot of entertainers, movie stars, and atheletes go through, drugs, alchohol, but this movie is dealing with alcohol and how it can mess up your life and what mess up a lot of entertainers lives. This is better to watch then to go to some 7.00 dollar movie, even though it was made in the 50s and a lot of movies didn't deal with those type of roles this is a most see, and all you young people out there don't let it scare you because it was made in the 1950s it is a really great film for all ages....more info
  • Susan Hayward acts and sings to the hilt in arguably her best performance ever
    This movie was an enormous boxoffice and critical hit in the USA in 1956 returning more than $6.000.0000 dollars in domestic run and going on to become an international critical and public smash winnig Susan Hayward the best actress award - the golden palm - at the prestigious 1956 Cannes film festival in France.

    Hayward gives it all and she will steal your heart in this gripping story of a 16 years long bout with alcoholism taking her to hell on earth ...and beyond.According to lots of fans and critics,she should have won an oscar for this role (she ultimately won for "I want to live" in 1959)

    Supporting work by Jo van Fleet (playing Hayward's mother) is superb too.

    Warner video annouces a great list of extra material for this DVD .

    A must have in your DVD library of Hollywood classics....more info
  • Susan Hayward SINGS and SWINGS
    This movie was truly one of the great flicks to come out of the 1950's and is a wonderful tribute to Susan Hayward, who was a gifted actress but also a very fine vocalist. In this film she demonstrates her singing skill with such memorable tunes as "Sitting on Top of the World", "Happiness is a Thing Called Joe" and the wonderfully uplifting "Sing, You Sinners!" She moves gracefully from one production number to the next. Unfortunately, we seldom got to see Susan Hayward actually sing in most of her films (for example, in VALLEY OF THE DOLLS, her singing voice is dubbed in by Margaret Whiting) so this Film is worth viewing if just for that feature. The acting is superb and the film is well constructed. An entertaining piece that deserves a place in your Video Library....more info
  • Very good indeed.
    The thing that makes this movie so amazing is the forthright way alcoholism is presented, especially since this was in the fifties. the recovery is a little too formulaic, but given the time constraints, it works....more info
  • Hayward At Her Finest
    The magnificent Hayward, again demonstrating her prowess in portraying alcoholics, this time in the true-life story of chanteuse and general party-girl, Lillian Roth. We begin with Lillian as a little girl, being trotted to all kinds of auditions by her scheming and manipulative stage mother, played by Van Fleet. One thing becomes another and soon Lillian is a star (with a repertoire that includes a much too serious rendition of "The Red, Red Robin..."), and Mother is pleased to be accumulating the trappings of luxury that she so richly deserves. But, when love enters the picture, Lillian is smitten and all of Mother's plans are threatened with derailment. When Lillian's young lover dies of an unnamed illness, she is devastated and has no interest in performing. But all-powerful Mother wields her strength, telling Lillian to snap out of it. It is a painful decision for Lillian, but she throws her mother out, and as Mother slinks off to the sidelines, Lillian, like her counterpart in "Smash-Up", soon takes a wee little drinkee to ease the pain. But as all alcoholics know, one drink is too many and a thousand is not enough, and soon Lillian is on the road to ruin. She gets tossed out of all the classiest places, and wakes up in bed with a strange man - even though they're both fully dressed and in twin beds. She falls under the spell of a Svengali, compellingly played by Conte, who convinces her that it's okay to drink, but just know when to stop. Of course, if that were possible for alcoholics, no one would need AA. She runs away and attempts suicide. But Hayward, being Hayward, survives it all, and with the help of AA (and Hollywood) she's back on top in no time. The video box informs us that the popularity of this movie at the time rekindled Miss Roth's career, but to a degree that Miss Roth began imitating *Miss Hayward's* version of Miss Roth. Life imitating art imitating life....more info
  • HAYWARD AT HER BEST and robbed of the OSCAR
    Watching women play alcoholics is tough--much more difficult than viewing men. But Susan Hayward who has played one 2 times prior in Oscar nominated performances, is downright tough. Her first SMASH-UP brought her stardom for her brilliant performance as a neglected wife who turned to the bottle. Two years later, MY FOOLISH HEART, a disallushioned Hayward drinks due to a tragic war-time romance then an unhappy and forced marriage (she was pregnant). This time around, Susan who portrays Lillian Roth, better than Roth portrays herself is nothing short of riveting. And the movie spares no punches. It is gritty seamy and a sometimes ugly portrait of a fallen star reduced to living on skid row. The bonus of the wonderful movie is Susan sings all the songs in the movie. Her voice is husky and an booming and fits her personality. Susan won her coveted award 3 years later, but she should have racked up 2. As a consolulation price, she did win The Cannes Film Festival Award, and had the distinction of being the first American actress to win this award.

    This is not a glossed over version dealing with very common and insidious disease and Hayward does not give the audience any sympathy in this role. She takes it and throws it in your face. Jo Van Fleet who won a best supporting award the same year for EAST OF EDEN (in a smaller role) probably won it mainly for her great performance as Hayward's pushy stage mother.

    This is a late review. But better late than never when it comes one of the cinematic greats. And where the hell is the DVD!

    ...more info
  • ONE DRINK IS TOO MANY AND A THOUSAND IS NOT ENOUGH; BUT BRAVO, SUSAN HAYWARD!
    I just saw "I'LL CRY TOMORROW" on TCM. I can't say that I found it particularly "enjoyable", but you've got to love Susan Hayward. I always loved Susan Hayward for her absolute fearlessness on film. She was not afraid to go to the dark places in the soul. Her characters and films frequently had a toughness, a gritiness to them. Life was rude and relentless to Susan (on film and in reality)). I always think of Susan (on film and in reality) as a lady who took many slaps to the face and punches in the gut, but who came out swinging and fighting every time.
    Many people championed Bette Davis with being so brave and fearless.
    Some reviewers feel that Susan's take on alcoholic singer Lillian Roth here is too full of Bette Davis-like histrionics and mannerisims. I strongly disagree. I hate movies like "HARVEY" and "ARTHUR" that make alcoholism seem like such a "fun past-time." This film definitely takes the different route. Susan takes Lillian Roth's alcoholism and throws it in your face, in all of its sordid ugliness and despair, and never once does she ask or beg the audience for sympathy.
    We first see Susan as Lilian Roth belt out (and that's Susan's real singing voice) "Sing, You Sinners!" That's early in the film, and it's the last moment of joy Lillian/Susan and the audience are going to get. I might have hit the bottle myself if I had a stage mother like Jo Van Fleet. But it's not mother that drives Lillian to drink.
    Denied a chance at happiness with her beloved David, (Ray Danton), Lillian, at first, needs a drink to get to sleep at night. Then she needs drinks to get through each day. Lillian brawls and boozes with two husbands.
    It appears that second husband Tony (Richard Conte) likely beat and raped her in a drunken rage of his own on a train trip, but the film is never too specific about the outcome of the brutal scene on the train.
    Susan Hayward gets as unglamourous as an actress can get in a film, as she becomes the personification of the "falling down drunk." Susan makes James Mason's drunk Norman Maine in the 1954 "A STAR IS BORN" look like a day at the beach with a picnic lunch! Eventually, she tries to throw herself out of a hotel window. She cries, "God help me!" and then falls backwards off the window and back into the room.
    I kept wishing she would stumble into AA. But, ironically, the scenes where she does find help from AA and Eddie Albert don't ring as true as the nightmarish years that precede her sobriety. "I'LL CRY TOMORROW" is every bit as harrowing as Susan's work in "I WANT TO LIVE!", where Barbara Graham goes to the gas chamber.
    Liliian Roth survives at the end of "I'LL CRY TOMORROW", but only just barely survives. "I'LL CRY TOMORROW" belongs on the short list of films like "DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES"and "LEAVING LAS VEGAS" that seriously make you think two and three times about having "just one little drink."...more info
  • Two great performances: Susan and Jo van Fleet
    This movie grabs you by the back of the neck and drags you places you've never been before. Never in any
    other movie--one about a man or a woman--has the viewer been taken so low as in the movie. And it's
    a wonderful experience. Susan Hayward lets herself off the leash completely and roars and bellows, and
    it's completely truthful: "OH! Look what you did, and you DID IT ON PURPOSE!!--this when her mother breaks
    a bottle containing the last two inches of Susan's whiskey. 'Well, what I'm doing now is wrong, and I'm doing it,
    and I don't care whether it's right or wrong, or good or bad, or WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR YOU DON'T LIKE IT,
    and just this once, I want you to LEAVE ME ALONE." Never has a daughter spoken to a mother in such tones,
    with such words. And Jo van Fleet gives just as good as she gets. This is a fine, scary portrait of alcoholism
    and dysfunctional mother-daughter relationship. You're gonna love it. ...more info
  • Susan swings and sways
    Susan Hayward, in her signature performance, will knock your socks off. Nobody could have done it better and nobody today could possibly match Susan's performance. Miss Hayward could deliver a line like no other and in this musical tragedy she has all the opportunites to display her talent.Many critics decried Susan over acted, but no way. She appropriately storms and declares like only she could. But all is not ranting and raving. Susan has a field day as she delivers singing star Lillian Roth's trademark songs. HAYWARD ACTUALLY SINGS THE SONGS TO THE DELIGHT OF HER FANS AND PRODUCERS OF THE MUCH TOUTED FILM. It is indeed a pleasure to see Susan sway and swing herself to the beat of many old standards. Look out! Susan is at the peak of her illustrious career. She was nominated and did not win for this cinematic triumph, but she captured the Oscar three years later for "I Want to Live." In reality she won the coveted honor for all the performances she delivered throughout the Forties and Fifties.Miss Hayward revealed many years late that this was her personal favorite. Unfortunately SUSAN HAYWARD died too soon but her legacy is her wonderful cinematic treats left to us all to enjoy....more info
  • Wonderful Film
    This is a wonderful film. When I realized it was based on her autobiography I immediately ordered the book. If you love the move I would highly recommend reading the book as well. The book fills in so many details. There's more information about her childhood. She had a sister - The Roth girls had an act together. Her father was an alcoholic and the book details her own downward spiral into alcoholism and alcohol related psychosis.She and her husband were instrumental in starting A.A. in Australia. The book is a great companion to the movie....more info
  • I like the old stuff.
    great old movie. they just don't make them anymore. this is good.
    acting is great, etc....more info
  • Susan swings and sways
    Susan Hayward, in her signature performance, will knock your socks off. Nobody could have done it better and nobody today could possibly match Susan's performance. Miss Hayward could deliver a line like no other and in this musical tragedy she has all the opportunites to display her talent.Many critics decried Susan over acted, but no way. She appropriately storms and declares like only she could. But all is not ranting and raving. Susan has a field day as she delivers singing star Lillian Roth's trademark songs. HAYWARD ACTUALLY SINGS THE SONGS TO THE DELIGHT OF HER FANS AND PRODUCERS OF THE MUCH TOUTED FILM. It is indeed a pleasure to see Susan sway and swing herself to the beat of many old standards. Look out! Susan is at the peak of her illustrious career. She was nominated and did not win for this cinematic triumph, but she captured the Oscar three years later for "I Want to Live." In reality she won the coveted h onor for all the performances she delivered throughout the Forties and Fifties.Unfortunately SUSAN HAYWARD died too soon but her legacy is her wonderful cinematic treats left to us all to enjoy....more info
  • One of the best performances of the 1950's
    Daniel Mann directed both "I'll Cry Tomorrow" and "The Rose Tattoo" in the same year, and these two films
    contained two performances of such passion and intensity that they are relevant at this remove. Hayward
    lost the Oscar to Anna Magnini, but "I'll Cry Tomorrow" has arguably outlasted the other movie. (B. Lancaster's
    embarrassing turn as the studly, vaguely retarded male lead in "The Rose Tattoo" hasn't helped the movie.)

    But to the point: Susan Hayward was perhaps not a great actress, yet this is a great performance. A talented
    actress, she had honed her skills carefully, playing everything from spitfires to girl-next-door. in "I'll Cry
    Tomorrow," though, she let go of the reins and threw herself head first into this part. She and Jo Van Fleet
    (who is brilliant), go at each other with such vigor that the viewer almost believes the words are being said for
    the first time. (There's a scene in which the two grapple over a liquor bottle so hard that the liquid sloshes out
    of the bottle and onto Hayward's hand. Susan goes right on, flicking off the scotch, so much into the
    scene that she steps all over Jo Van Fleet's lines. Well, the other actress is right in there battling, and she
    holds her composure and finally grabs Hayward's arm to draw the actress back into the scene.) It's riveting.

    No female star had ever gone down so far in a performance of degredation, and Hayward goes for the heart
    of it. Totally without makeup, her hair greasy and her freckles showing, Hayward delivers a barnburner of a
    performance in the big scenes with van Fleeet, but she's also expert at the quiet moments.

    Plus all this, Hayward sings, and we buy her as a professional singer: amazing that a dramatic actress shows
    us another string to her bow at that stage in her career. So. It's a a beautifully directed, well-enough written
    film about Lillian Roth. The selling point, though is Susan Hayward's I'll-dive-off-a-cliff performance. Don't
    miss it. She got the Oscar three years later, but it should have gone to her for this one. (And watch for the
    scene which begins with Susan shouting "I DON'T WANNA HAVE A FEW LAUGHS, AND I DON'T WANNA CRACK
    A FEW JOKES." The single most intense scene between a mother and daughter on film)....more info