Wall Street (1987) [VHS]
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Product Description

Michael Douglas won an Oscar for perfectly embodying the Reagan-era credo that "greed is good." As a Donald Trump-like Wall Street raider aptly named Gordon Gecko (for his reptilian ability to attack corporate targets and swallow them whole), Douglas found a role tailor-made to his skill in portraying heartless men who've sacrificed humanity to power. He's a slick, seductive role model for the young ambitious Wall Street broker played by Charlie Sheen, who falls into Gecko's sphere of influence and instantly succumbs to the allure of risky deals and generous payoffs. With such perks as a high-rise apartment and women who love men for their money, Charlie's like a worm on Gecko's hook, blind to the corporate maneuvering that puts him at odds with his own father (played by Sheen's offscreen father, Martin). With his usual lack of subtlety, writer-director Oliver Stone drew from the brokering experience of his own father to tell this Faustian tale for the "me" decade, but the movie's sledgehammer style is undeniably effective. A cautionary warning that Stone delivers on highly entertaining terms, Wall Street grabs your attention while questioning the corrupted values of a system that worships profit at the cost of one's soul. --Jeff Shannon

Michael Douglas won an Oscar for perfectly embodying the Reagan-era credo that "greed is good." As a Donald Trump-like Wall Street raider aptly named Gordon Gecko (for his reptilian ability to attack corporate targets and swallow them whole), Douglas found a role tailor-made to his skill in portraying heartless men who've sacrificed humanity to power. He's a slick, seductive role model for the young ambitious Wall Street broker played by Charlie Sheen, who falls into Gecko's sphere of influence and instantly succumbs to the allure of risky deals and generous payoffs. With such perks as a high-rise apartment and women who love men for their money, Charlie's like a worm on Gecko's hook, blind to the corporate maneuvering that puts him at odds with his own father (played by Sheen's offscreen father, Martin). With his usual lack of subtlety, writer-director Oliver Stone drew from the brokering experience of his own father to tell this Faustian tale for the "me" decade, but the movie's sledgehammer style is undeniably effective. A cautionary warning that Stone delivers on highly entertaining terms, Wall Street grabs your attention while questioning the corrupted values of a system that worships profit at the cost of one's soul. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews:

  • Entertaining Film, Douglas Is Terrific
    Wall Street is so 1980s and that's not a bad thing!!

    Michael Douglas IS Gordon Gecko in this film and that's probably why he walked off with the Oscar for Best Actor at the 1988 Academy Awards in this fascinating look at the high pressure world of the stock market.

    While Charlie Sheen was the hot commodity at the time this film was made, his acting hasn't aged well and it's quite clear that a better choice could have been found for this movie, where the same thing can be said for Darryl Hannah who is only slightly better in her role as the high priced artist for sale to the highest bidder (richest boytoy she can find).

    Oliver Stone's directing is very good but the backstory relating to BlueStar airlines could have been a little better but perhaps I just don't have very positive memories because of the trite acting by Charlie Sheen.

    However, Michael Douglas alone is worth watching this film and its the performance of his career.

    **** RECOMMENDED...more info
  • Nice transfer
    Upon the moment of arrival I popped it into the Blu-ray player, eager to see how the transfer to HD faired. All in all, a decent transfer. The audio could have been remastered in some parts where it's clear there were some audio issues in the original (uneven volume, out of sync with actors...both those were in the original film though). The open and closing credits look like they were shot with a dirty camera lens, barely conveying the idea it *might* have been an "artistic choice", but the rest of the film looks pretty good. The film grain is definitely visible, but not to the point where it's intrusive or gives the impression it was a bad transfer.

    The movie is a great one and the extras are a great addition to this HD upgrade. A documentary talks about the making of the film (and the inter-personal conflicts between the actors...Daryl Hannah was very unhappy with her role and Sean Young clashed with Charlie Sheen so much they had to be separated). Oliver Stone's commentary is insightful and there are little gems all throughput the film....more info
  • EXCELLENT FILM!!!
    What can I say that hasn't all ready been said? This movie was great,it captured the greed of business to the T! I have been in sililar situations,and have dealt with people who were seemingly cloned from Gordon Gecko.So I am able to relate somewhat.

    If you haven't seen this movie,do yourself a favor and check it out...GREED IS GOOD....more info
  • Oliver Stone's perception of 1980s corporate America
    (Note to those who complain about Amazon's price: YOU DON'T HAVE TO BUY IT. Go elsewhere, then.)

    This is one of those rare movies I could watch over and over again, and/or rewind a scene to watch it a couple of times more. That especially applies to the montage of frenzied traders, where Stone makes a brief cameo. There are many visual subtleties, from camera perspectives to item inclusion, that a less talented filmmaker would happen on only by luck. It's a shame the theatrical version cut out the extras on the 20th anniversary DVD; not a frame was wasted. Well, I take that back: the obligatory bed scene with Bud and Darien. I don't say that because I'm a prude, but because it didn't add anything to the story.

    It's nothing new to say that Michael Douglas gave the performance of a lifetime -- perhaps anyone's lifetime. Martin and Charlie Sheen, the latter noticeably less muscled than later years, also gave strong performances that were Oscar-worthy. Also of note is Hal Holbrook, who I wish had more lines. However, it fits with the story: if his character had had more time with Bud before the latter got in too deep, Bud wouldn't have needed the shocks of the liquidation meeting and his father's heart attack.

    Simply a masterpiece of a movie....more info
  • One of the Best Movies of the 1980's
    Oliver Stone will never be known for subtlety. "Wall Street" bashes you over the head with its message- getting to the top in society requires duplicity, dishonesty, and the willingness to destroy any obstacle. However, unlike Ayn Rand, Stone vilifies rather than lauds this dubious morality. Bud Fox is a fresh faced, innocent stock broker trying to get ahead through hard work and elbow grease, as he was taught by his father. Bud soon meets powerful, charismatic corporate raider Gordon Gekko, incapable of love, remorse, or empathy. Gekko, we are told, sold NASA short 15 minutes after the Challenger exploded (impossible since the shuttle was destroyed in 1986 and the film is set in 1985!). Gekko predictably seduces Bud with his world of "perks", and Bud's star rises dramatically the farther he falls into corruption.

    Throughout the film, Bud serves as a sounding board for the rival values of Gekko and his father. The speech most cited by critics and fans is the immortal "Greed is Good" monologue. While this speech, standing alone, is a vigorous defense of capitalism and selfishness, it is important to note that Gekko is using it at a shareholders' meeting against a lousy, entrenched, and greedy management!

    Inevitably, Bud is forced to decide whether to follow his father's philosophy or Gekko's, and to pay the price for his misdeeds. A slight complaint with the ending- the fate of Gekko is hinted at rather than displayed. Gordon Gekko has become something of a hero for young, wanna-be big shots, who are attracted to the glamour of his lifestyle and his "up your's, I got mine!" attitude much as Bud was. Perhaps seeing Gekko get his comeuppance could have made an impression.

    Overall, Wall Street is a tight, well done character drama populated with iconic characters delivering iconic dialogue that acts as an indictment of a decade. The movie and its message will stay with you long after viewing it.

    As for the DVD, the sound, although in 5.1, is relegated almost exclusively to the center channel. One does not hear the sounds of Manhattan from all directions as Bud navigates the concrete jungle. The video quality appears grainy in some areas. This is a great movie worthy of better treatment on DVD....more info

  • My favourite movie
    I found this movie to be fantastic. I loved every minute of it. Most of this movie seemed to tie in with politics. Being a conservative, I found this very interesting. The plot of millionare Gordon Gekko followed along the ways life should be lived. Greed, power, and self-confidence.

    Revenge was another big part in this movie. I liked how Charlie
    Sheen played his role of Bud Fox. Towards the end the focus was to screw over Gekko and to have sweet revenge.

    From this movie came my favourite quote of all:
    "... greed, for the lack of a better word , is good. Greed is right, Greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essense of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all its forms-greed for life, for money, knowledge has marked an upward surge of mankind..."

    I'm not sure that my way is the way that Oliver Stone intended his movie to be interpereted. Oh well, I don't necessarilly care. Greed is Good!...more info

  • STONE TRIED TO DISS CAPITALISM, GLORIFIED IT INSTEAD
    In 1987 OLIVER STONE again starred Charlie Sheen, this time as Bud Fox, along with Martin Sheen and Michael Douglas, in "Wall Street". Stone, like Coppola's "Patton", tapped into a part of America he really wanted to discredit, but instead glorified. Based on the go-go stock markets of the Reagan '80s, it is loosely based on inside arbitrageurs and junk bond kings like Ivan Boesky and Michael Milken. Fox/Sheen is an idealistic, ambitious young stockbroker, his father is his conscience, and Douglas as Gordon Gekko is pure tantalizing temptation. Fox must violate SEC laws and get inside information in order to do business with the "big elephant" Gekko. Gekko's star fades when a big deal-gone-bad has personal ramifications, and Fox turns a dime on him. The film is supposed to show that America is a greedy place that "produces nothing" in a "zero sum game" in which the rich only make money on the backs of the poor. Gekko's (Stone's) statements about economics are pure, unadulterated economic lies shown to be lies simply by...observing factual things. Where Stone may have had second thoughts was the reaction the film got. As the years went by, he and others were approached countless times by Young Republicans and Wall Street execs who told him the depiction of the exciting world of finance led them into that very career, which they thanked him for! Stone had hoped to create an egalitarian class. Instead, he created a decade full of Gordon Gekkos. They in turn fueled the dot-com boom. It was not unlike the Democrats who hoped to expose Oliver North and the Republicans in the Iran-Contra "scandal," only to discover that millions thought Ollie and his White House pals were doing God's work in fighting Communism.
    Res ipsa loquiter.

    STEVEN TRAVERS
    AUTHOR OF "BARRY BONDS: BASEBALL'S SUPERMAN"
    STWRITES@AOL.COM...more info

  • Happy Camper
    Awesome seller! I think I received the DVD in the mail about 30 seconds after I ordered it. Very impressed!...more info
  • Great
    Great movie but I didn't find anything special about the extras in the 20th Anniversary Edition....more info
  • The Street of dreams
    This is Oliver Stone's disection of inside trading on Wall Street and the road to big bucks. Charlie Sheen plays the young broker who sells out his father by revealing some inside information to wheeler dealer Michael Douglas. It's an old-fashioned morality play, though, with Charlie trying to mend his ways. It's a hard-hitting, very well-acted drama - and effective because Stone incorporates all the old ideals of repentence and "crime does not pay." It's a two-actor movie, however, which limits what it could have been....more info
  • Classic Movie but Blu ray Quality not impressive
    Great movie! Although better quality than a DVD but not that impressive for a blu ray. ...more info
  • Classic, must have
    This movie is definitely a classic and a must buy for those who appreciated Boiler Room and like making $$....more info
  • Greed is Good?
    The SEC in this 1980's film is far more effective than the SEC of 2008, but this is a film and the SEC was pretty much worthless back then too. Trust is the basis for business, not greed. When you can't trust financial statements, CEO and executives consistently lie, and you reward incompetence then the system fails.

    You look at a movie like WallStreet and realize not much is different from the 80's. The cycles repeat, there is no limit to human greed, it is far easier for a good person to go bad than a bad person to ever go good and it is a bit depressing.

    It's funny looking at Wall Street with the green text monitors, brick cell phones, 80's style excess, and everything is dated, but you also realize the movie's story and warnings are the same today in 2009.

    ...more info
  • No "All New Commentary" by Oliver Stone!
    Be prepared for a disappointment, as this DVD doesn't include the "all new commentary from director Oliver Stone", merely reusing the one from the previous disc. The other additional features are great, but does not outweigh the disappointment, nor the fact that the title isn't really remastered that well from it's previous transfer....more info
  • Greed, for lack of a better word...is good
    The above is part of the long speech that actor Michael Douglas gives as Wall Street power-player Gordon Gekko. Contrary to Amazon's reviewer, this role was NOT tailor-made for Douglas, who in fact came out of a long string of TV-and-movie roles as the somewhat light and romantic type. He initially struggled in the role that would ultimately win him the Oscar.

    Charlie Sheen plays Bud Fox, an aspiring power-player wannbee, who eventually gets to work for Gekko. Ultimately it leads to the take-over and subsequent downfall of the company that Bud's father, played by Martin Sheen, works for. It all comes crashing down around Bud, but he is determined to take Gekko down with him. Does he succeed? Financially, yes, but legally or morally, it is ambiguous.

    Other notables include Darryl Hannah, Terence Stamp, Hal Holbrook, John C. McGinley, and James Spader.

    As in all Stone films, there is a lot of power and depth. The DVD has a good "making of" documentary, and Oliver Stone's commentary about the film and his own father's real life occupation as a Wall Street broker.

    I say...buy!...more info

  • Best Movie
    One of the best movies I have ever seen. I think this is the only movie which I have seen multiple times . MD is perfect in his role....more info
  • 3 stars out of 4
    The Bottom Line:

    Wall Street wastes Daryl Hannah but makes up for it with a magnetic Michael Douglas in the lead; it's not one of Oliver Stone's best but it's effective and enjoyable enough....more info
  • Greed is good, and so is this movie!
    When Michael Douglas won his Oscar, he thanked the directors "Because most people thought this was a role I couldn't play." And it is, far different from fun like "Romancing the Stone" but he does it very, very convincingly. "Greed is good" says Douglas' Gekko, and proves it to his innocent understudy, Charlie Sheen as a stockbroker. It's also great to see Charlie and Martin together as...father and son. Darryl Hannah is hot as ever as Gekko's ex-mistress and Sheen's new love. This movie posts quite a question....how much money is enough and how far are you willing to go to get it? An interesting look as well into the financial wheelings and dealings of corporate America....more info
  • The movie that helped to end the Cold war
    To watch this movie in Moscow in 1988 as a student was a liberating and exhilarating experience. Here is the capitalism close-up, warts and all. And we loved it. In three more years the Soviet communism will be dismantled, free market hurriedly introduced, and some of my friends and fellow students will proceed to become very rich people themselves. I did not know then, that Gordon Gekko, a villain who incidentally was much admired by me, was a thinly veiled portrait of Ivan Boesky. Boesky, who incidentally was a son of Russian immigrants, became a center of the biggest insider trading scandal and government investigation in the 1980s, which let to the collapse of junk bond powerhouse firm Drexel Burnham. However, I knew that Gekko must be much more than a villain, otherwise how this ugly character could be so attractive? Of course, a huge part of it was a superb acting by Michael Douglas. But watching this film now, 17 years later, gave me an opportunity to ponder more on the subject from a different perspective. I think now that Gekko's character is archetypal and has the same qualities as Bulgakov's Woland from `Master and Margarita'. He is the Wall Street Mephistopheles, the Grand seducer, not just some greedy upstart and `faux bonhomme'. But one of the qualities of Lucifer is that he `brings out the light', he helps to illuminate things, partly because of his own darkness. Untimely, in the movie it was his turbulent encounter with Gekko, which helped Bud Fox to find his character and, in a way, redeem himself. So in some strange way, the movie is a Wall-Street-version of age-old story of Faust....more info
  • Well-Acted and Classic Movie
    This movie is my all-time favorite. The snappy quips and memorable quotes are the features of a very well-written and well-acted movie. Michael Douglas as Gordon Gekko is one of the great all-time movie characters. This movie epitomizes how greed was interwoven into the Wall Street scandals of the 1980's. Oliver Stone's depiction of this time in American history is extremely well done. The extras in this DVD give the viewer a behind-the-scenes look at the actors and the legacy of this classic film. I highly recommend this movie to anyone who values great acting and excellent character development. ...more info
  • A Classic!
    This is a simply a must have. An 80's classic with and excellent perfomance of Michael Douglas, with one of the most powerfull names ever... Gordon Gekko!...more info
  • Amazing movie...
    Few movies capture the mind and heart as this movie. It is basically about Bud Fox, a sales manager in Wall Street. He deals mostly low-key shares and he is aiming for the big time. He seeks the opportunity to work with Gordon Gecko, a multi-billionaire investor who is smart as he is ruthless. Meanwhile, Bud Fox is also facing his father's criticism about what he does for a living..."Create, instead of living off the buying and selling of other people's money", his father says. I admit, I am addicted to this movie. Every few months, I have to slot in the DVD and watch it. It is a delight to watch every single time. This movie deals with many important and all too real issues. Everybody wants to be rich, but how far would you go to achieve that goal? Is it worth betraying the people you love? Changing your morals and values in life? And when you do make it big, who can you trust? How sure are you? These are just some of the elements Oliver Stone delved into in this movie. Using Wall Street and the share market as his backdrop, he has created a masterpiece.

    The first thing that immediately grabs you is the acting. Superb performances from some of the most talented but often misused actors in Hollywood. Michael Douglas has always been one of my favourite actors and in this movie, he IS Gordon Gecko. He is the epitome of corporate power. The way he speaks, and acts....classic stuff. One of my favourite scenes, is when he gives the speech during the shareholder meeting of Teldar Paper. Unbelievably good! He won a truly deserving Oscar for his portrayal of Gecko. Because of Douglas' fantastic acting, it tends to overshadow another actor who is as deserving of praise, Charlie Sheen. To be honest, I am not a fan of Charlie Sheen and found his acting mediocre in many movies, which was why I was pleasantly surprised with his acting here. He was really very good as Bud Fox, looking up to Gecko as his mentor, never overacting and having the coolness to pull off lines like "You get out that door, I'm changing the locks". He plays the part of a young man not knowing exactly what he wants in life once he achieved his idea of success perfectly. And the supporting cast, Martin Sheen (playing Bud Fox's dad with pure emotion, it seems like he's saying what he really means to his son) and Darryl Hannah (as Bud Fox's love interest) does not disappoint.

    Kudos to Oliver Stone for writing such a powerful script. This is not the usual garbage Hollywood likes to dump us with...this is a brilliant screenplay with great dialogue. "Greed will not only save Teldar Papers, but that other malfunctioning corporation known as the United States", Gecko says. Heck, even at home, I felt like giving a standing ovation to that. And the camera angles were also something I found fascinating in this movie. For example, when we're first shown Gecko, we don't get to see him immediately. Oliver Stone teases us with a Fortune magazine cover, and then by a shot of his office, when someone enters his office, the door opens and closes just enough time so that we get a glimpse of Gecko and hear his voice but never really getting a good look of him, right until Bud Fox meets with him. And towards the end, when things go wrong, a dark shadow falls upon the office. Beautiful!

    Honestly, everything about this movie seems to work perfectly, which is why the 5-star rating. This is one of my all-time favourites and I highly recommend this movie to anyone, whether you're involved in the share market or not, because the scope of this movie extends to so much more than that, that I'm sure different people would appreciate it on different levels. A definite must-see!...more info
  • Boring, confusing, lacking in character depth...
    I didn't like this movie. It was VERY dull and confusing, and it was nearly impossible to relate to, sympathize with or understand any of the characters. The acting was pretty good, but overall I just couldn't wait for the movie to be over!...more info
  • Wall Street Journal/Shuffle
    Wall Street is interesting as an entertaining and compelling story, that made for a very enjoyable movie experience; but on a deeper level, there is a message about the dangers of unrestrained capitalism--a message that is unfortunately undercut by the dashing and charismatic character of Gordon Gekko, who delivers a speech that is the centerpiece of the film, a speech that really captured the tenor of the times, the Me Generation ethos of the late 80s, the now famous and still remembered and quoted "Greed is Good" speech:

    "The point is, ladies and gentleman, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA. Thank you very much."

    Director Oliver Stone wanted this character to be the villain, giving him the name of a lizard. He was meant to be a cold blooded reptilian character, like a dragon hoarding his treasure in a cave. Some young people take him as a role model. He was clearly not supposed to be, but look at another Oliver Stone film, Natural Born Killers, and the same thing happened there. Oliver Stone takes chances in his films, and though they don't always turn out the way he plans, you have to admire the man. This film in particular really captured an era, and he showed tremendous foresight, in fact it was released in 1987, just before one of the biggest stock market melt-downs in history that happened in October of that year. It also shows the power of information, and even though that information is used to manipulate the market and destroy companies, it truly does foreshadow The Information Age. It is quaint to see the crude graphics on the screens of the computers they used, but what insight it showed into what power would be unleashed by the information displayed there.

    So, this movie is enjoyable on these two levels, as entertaining drama, and as a serious message about money, capitalism, and the rampant greed of the late 80s, but it is also entertaining just for the behind the scenes drama of the people in it.

    First, there is a very strong father/son element to Wall Street. Oliver Stone's father, Louis Stone, was a big trader on Wall Street. The film is dedicated to him. And, Oliver Stone's own son, Sean Stone, plays one of Gordon Gekko's children. Oliver Stone was himself a Vietnam veteran, and he had cast Charlie Sheen in Platoon, a big success for them both just the year before. After Wall Street, he would make another Vietnam film, Born on the Fourth of July, but instead of casting Charlie as promised, Tom Cruise would get the role. Stone didn't even bother to tell him, which led to a falling out and they have never worked together since.

    Charlie Sheen's father, Martin Sheen, played Charlie's character's dad, Carl Fox. Charlie was Bud Fox. Father and son both had big success playing soldiers in Viet Nam, and both would have near-death experiences while making them. While filming Apocalypse Now the elder Sheen suffered a heart attack, and while filming Platoon, the younger Sheen almost fell out of a helicopter. I will revisit the father/son theme later when I discuss Michael Douglas, but back to the Sheen's for now. A lot of the drama of Wall Street revolves around the father/son relationship. Bud Fox's dad works for an airline, and he is hard working and honest. Bud uses inside information gleaned from his father to win favor with Gordon Gekko, who uses that information to gain control of the airline, and then try to wreck it and sell off the pieces. This betrayal is the pivotal point of the whole movie.

    Martin Sheen's real name is Ramon Antonio Gerard Est¨¦vez. He is part Irish, and part Spanish, and enjoys being Spanish almost as much as he does being Irish, and he really enjoys being Irish. Though he has played President of the United States at least 4 times, perhaps most memorably as President Jed Bartlett on the long running TV series The West Wing, in real life he is a life long political activist who has been arrested at protests over 70 times. He also knows all the lyrics and can sing every song that was ever sung by Frank Sinatra. In addition to Charlie, 3 of his other children are also actors. Emilio Est¨¦vez is Charlie's older brother, and 2 others go by the Est¨¦vez name. But those who know him say that he is closest to his son, Charlie. "No father could ever be prouder of his son," said, Sheen, the Elder. "I hold Charlie's accomplishments dearer than my own. He has been through so much and overcome so much more. Even if he weren't my son he'd still be my best friend."

    Charlie Sheen's real name was Carlos Irwin Est¨¦vez. He was born on September 3, 1965, in New York City. He was born a "blue baby," and the doctor who saved him was named Irwin, and hence the middle name. Though he was only 2 years old when Danny O'Keefe wrote "Good Time Charlie's Got the Blues" in 1967, it really could have been written about him. One of his nick names is Good Time Charlie, and the other is The Machine, which is partly due to his name being Sheen. At the trial of Heidi Fleiss he testified under oath that he spent over $50,000 on her high priced call girls. He is a notorious womanizer, boozer, and druggie, who has perhaps finally settled down, at least with regards to drugs and booze. At one point he almost died of a cocaine overdose, and he was in and out of rehab. Once he checked in for only a day.

    "One of my fondest memories is when Slash, from Guns N' Roses, sat me down at his house and said, `You've got to clean up your act.' You know you've gone too far when Slash is saying, `Look, you've got to get into rehab, you have to shut it down. You're going to die.' He's a terrific guy and I love him, he's a buddy of mine, but I had to step back from that situation and go, `Yeah, but you're Slash. Whaddya mean?' We'd been up for about four days. But I still heard him because a part of me was saying, `This isn't as much fun as I thought it was going to be. Something's missing.'"

    Platoon and Wall Street are so far his best film roles, but he has settled into a cozy career as a sit com actor, first on Spin City, and currently on Two and a Half Men, which is already in syndication, playing reruns twice a day Monday through Friday, while still making fresh episodes. The character is loosely based on himself, though one would think it is a very much watered down version. As with his role in Spin City, his characters always seem to be named Charlie.

    Continuing the father/son theme, actor Michael Douglas is the son of well-known actor Kirk Douglas. The elder Douglas is best known for his role as Spartacus.

    "I am Spartacus."
    "I am Spartacus."
    "I am Spartacus."

    Michael Douglas had a breakthrough role as Inspector Steve Keller on the TV cop series The Streets of San Francisco. He played opposite veteran actor Karl Malden. He played some comedies and even played Zach in the movie version of A Chorus Line before playing in Fatal Attraction, in 1987, the same year as Wall Street, and Basic Instinct, in 1992. Recently there was a series on NPR (National Public Radio) of the most memorable characters from film and fiction, and Gordon Gekko was profiled. Premiere Magazine had a list of the 100 most memorable characters from film, and Gordon Gekko was #25. Michael Douglas won an Oscar for the role. Besides being married to the much younger (25 years) Catherine Zeta-Jones, his role as Gordon Gekko in Wall Street will no doubt be his legacy:

    Gordon Gekko: If you need a friend, get a dog.

    Gordon Gekko: The most valuable commodity I know of is information.

    Gordon Gekko: Greed captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.

    Gordon Gekko: I look at a hundred deals a day. I pick one.

    Gordon Gekko: Lunch is for wimps.

    Gordon Gekko: You're walking around blind without a cane, pal. A fool and his money are lucky enough to get together in the first place.

    Gordon Gekko: Ever wonder why fund managers can't beat the S&P 500? 'Cause they're sheep, and sheep get slaughtered.

    Gordon Gekko: [at the Teldar Paper stockholder's meeting] Well, I appreciate the opportunity you're giving me Mr. Cromwell as the single largest shareholder in Teldar Paper, to speak. Well, ladies and gentlemen we're not here to indulge in fantasy but in political and economic reality. America, America has become a second-rate power. Its trade deficit and its fiscal deficit are at nightmare proportions. Now, in the days of the free market when our country was a top industrial power, there was accountability to the stockholder. The Carnegies, the Mellons, the men that built this great industrial empire, made sure of it because it was their money at stake. Today, management has no stake in the company! All together, these men sitting up here own less than three percent of the company. And where does Mr. Cromwell put his million-dollar salary? Not in Teldar stock; he owns less than one percent. You own the company. That's right, you, the stockholder. And you are all being royally screwed over by these, these bureaucrats, with their luncheons, their hunting and fishing trips, their corporate jets and golden parachutes.
    Cromwell: This is an outrage! You're out of line Gekko!
    Gordon Gekko: Teldar Paper, Mr. Cromwell, Teldar Paper has 33 different vice presidents each earning over 200 thousand dollars a year. Now, I have spent the last two months analyzing what all these guys do, and I still can't figure it out. One thing I do know is that our paper company lost 110 million dollars last year, and I'll bet that half of that was spent in all the paperwork going back and forth between all these vice presidents. The new law of evolution in corporate America seems to be survival of the unfittest. Well, in my book you either do it right or you get eliminated. In the last seven deals that I've been involved with, there were 2.5 million stockholders who have made a pretax profit of 12 billion dollars. Thank you. I am not a destroyer of companies. I am a liberator of them! The point is, ladies and gentleman, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA. Thank you very much.

    Gordon Gekko: Greed is good.

    This movie also had some other interesting characters/actors and character actors. John C. McGinley plays Marv, one of the other stock traders who works alongside Bud Fox. He is familiar as Dr. Perry Cox, the anti social doctor on TV sit com Scrubs. And Hal Holbrook is working there, too. Sylvia Miles plays a crass Real Estate Agent. She was nominated for an Oscar for Midnight Cowboy, and has been on the Hollywood/New York party scene for like ever. The best line about her was when someone name dropped that she would be at an art gallery opening, someone, can't remember who but if anyone does, please help me provide them with the proper credit, quipped: "Sylvia Miles would go to the opening of an envelope." James Spader (Sex, Lies & Videotape) plays a lawyer friend of Bud's. He currently plays a lawyer on Boston Legal. Daryl Hannah plays a designer who is Bud's girlfriend, once he starts making money. She is secretly in bed with Gekko, though. Her biggest tabloid moment was when she was a back-up singer and girlfriend to Jackson Browne, and he allegedly got rough with her. Then John F. Kennedy Jr. reportedly came to her rescue. Daryl's breakout role was as the acrobatic, beautiful replicant Pris in Blade Runner (1982); Pris was the vixen who wanted to live beyond her allotted years.

    Segue to Sean Young, who was also in Blade Runner. What a classic movie, and was she ever great in it. I have always liked her, but she seems to attract ugly rumors like a magnet. She plays Kate Gekko in Wall Street, Gordon's wife. Her role was bigger at first, but during filming she rubbed Oliver Stone the wrong way. Whether that story is true or false, she is barely on screen long enough to register.

    In 1988, Young appeared in The Boost with James Woods. Woods later sued her for harassing both him and his then-fianc¨¦e, alleging that Young left a disfigured doll on his doorstep in addition to other disruptive behavior. Young denied the allegations and claimed that Woods filed the lawsuit out of spite. Young stated, "It was a crush being turned down, that's all.... So sue me! And he [Woods] did." The suit was settled out of court in 1989.

    In 1989, she was cast as Vicki Vale in Tim Burton's Batman. During rehearsals, she broke her arm after falling off a horse and was replaced by Kim Basinger. In an unsuccessful attempt to win the role as Catwoman (which ultimately went to Michelle Pfeiffer) in the sequel Batman Returns, Young constructed a homemade Catwoman costume and attempted to confront director Tim Burton and actor Michael Keaton during production.

    Young was fired from the 1990 movie Dick Tracy. Cast as Tess Trueheart, she was officially fired for not appearing maternal in the role. Young later claimed she was fired because she rebuffed Warren Beatty's advances (a claim Beatty denies).

    Sean Young appeared in Fatal Instinct, a parody of both Basic Instinct and Fatal Attraction--take that, Michael Douglas.

    In January 2008, Young checked herself into rehab for alcohol abuse the day after an outburst at the Directors Guild of America awards in Los Angeles. Young was removed from the awards ceremony after repeatedly heckling director Julian Schnabel, who was onstage giving his remarks regarding his Best Director nomination for his work on the film, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

    I hope Sean Young recovers from her problems. But if Charlie Sheen could do it, so can she.

    Even as we speak a writer is working on a sequel to Wall Street. Oliver Stone isn't involved, but Michael Douglas has agreed to reprise his role as Gordon Gekko. The title, which was used already for a documentary about the making of Wall Street, is Money Never Sleeps.

    Thanks to the Internet Movie Database and Wikipedia for the quotes and other biographical information. The contents of these sites are created by users, and it is not screened or verified by IMDb or Wikipedia staff.

    Platoon (Special Edition)

    Two and a Half Men - The Complete First Season

    Fatal Attraction

    Basic Instinct

    Streets of San Francisco - Season 1 (Vol. 1-2)

    Apocalypse Now

    The West Wing - The Complete Series Collection

    Spartacus

    Blade Runner - The Final Cut (Two-Disc Special Edition)

    Fatal Instinct


    ...more info
  • STONE TRIED TO DISS CAPITALISM, GLORIFIED IT INSTEAD
    In 1987 OLIVER STONE again starred Charlie Sheen, this time as Bud Fox, along with Martin Sheen and Michael Douglas, in "Wall Street". Stone, like Coppola's "Patton", tapped into a part of America he really wanted to discredit, but instead glorified. Based on the go-go stock markets of the Reagan '80s, it is loosely based on inside arbitrageurs and junk bond kings like Ivan Boesky and Michael Milken. Fox/Sheen is an idealistic, ambitious young stockbroker, his father is his conscience, and Douglas as Gordon Gekko is pure tantalizing temptation. Fox must violate SEC laws and get inside information in order to do business with the "big elephant" Gekko. Gekko's star fades when a big deal-gone-bad has personal ramifications, and Fox turns a dime on him. The film is supposed to show that America is a greedy place that "produces nothing" in a "zero sum game" in which the rich only make money on the backs of the poor. Gekko's (Stone's) statements about economics are pure, unadulterated economic lies shown to be lies simply by?observing factual things. Where Stone may have had second thoughts was the reaction the film got. As the years went by, he and others were approached countless times by Young Republicans and Wall Street execs who told him the depiction of the exciting world of finance led them into that very career, which they thanked him for! Stone had hoped to create an egalitarian class. Instead, he created a decade full of Gordon Gekkos. They in turn fueled the dot-com boom. It was not unlike the Democrats who hoped to expose Oliver North and the Republicans in the Iran-Contra "scandal," only to discover that millions thought Ollie and his White House pals were doing God's work in fighting Communism.
    Res ipsa loquiter....more info
  • great movie
    This movie is one of the best portayals of Wallstreet out there. Yes there is some creative license taken but that's Hollywood. The script is great, the cast is phenomenal and Oliver Stone does a really good job with this film....more info
  • Gekko The Great
    Real-life bigtime investment banker Jeff Beck not only advised Oliver Stone when he made 'Wallstreet' but also stars in this film for a few minutes playing himself at a climactic meeting of topdog-lawyers and bankers. He delivers one of the many exhilarating monologues in this Epic tale of greed, pride and innocence lost. "Now your boss will really start thinking he's Gekko the Great!" He shouts at Bud Fox (Charlie Sheen) who plays a struggling young stockbroker who's desperately trying to get on the fast track to becoming a "player".
    Michael Douglas who plays 'Gordon Gekko' (not 'Gecko' as the Amazon review suggests, the name can be seen in the scene where Charlie Sheen turns on his computer in the morning and finds out it's "Gekko's Birthday") puts on such a mind-blowing performance he really can be dubbed 'Gekko the Great'. The character is right up there with Don Vito Corleone, Tony Montana, Begbie, Popeye Doyle and some other members of that elite group of high-octane male movie-characters that will long outlive the actors that created them.

    Gordon Gekko is a high profile corporate raider that was probably modelled after Ivan Boesky (the biggest corporate raider of the 80's who eventually went behind bars for insider-trading), Michael Milken (creator and unchallenged 80's king of the high yield or junk-bond) and John Guttfreund (CEO of Salomon Brothers in the 80's who's extravert and bizarre behaviour is documented in the classic books "Liar's Poker" (Michael Lewis) and "Barbarians at the Gate" (John Helyar).

    Michael Douglas seems to have been born to play this part and from the moment he is introduced ("Lunch? whaddaya kiddin' me, lunch is for wimps!") to the moment we viewers have to part from his hypnotic character ("I gave you Darian, I gave you everything!") he reduces any leaps of faith that his character may present us with to tiny hops due to his powerhouse presence. In fact, whenever I see Michael Douglas in another movie I have the strange feeling that Gordon Gekko is trapped inside and might burst out at any time to hose us down with sardonic one-liners. ("Love is just an old lie created to keep people from jumping out of windows.")

    Gekko is truly the mother of all high rollers, and his performance alone more than warrants the purchase of this film. Apart from that it looks great with crisp Miami Vice type of clean-cut shots and scenery. The whole set up is utterly believable. I work in Derivatives Sales in London and deal with brokers, traders and senior decision makers of the world's leading investment firms on a daily basis. Either they all modelled themselves after Gordon Gekko or for some reason Michael Douglas got it exactly right. Aggression, impatience with political correctness and urgency to get deals/trades done is what this movie and real Capital Markets are all about.

    Charles Sheen plays a believable 'Bud Fox' but one wonders what a late 80's Tom Cruise or Kiefer Sutherland might have done with the part. Charlie never really creates the electricity that Douglas shocks the audience with. A baffling fact is that Stone admits on this DVD in an interview that Cruise called him to say he'd love to play the part but Stone "had already promised it to Charlie".

    I won't get into the details of the story here but will post some comments on the general themes in the movie.

    There's the theme that Stone had already explored in 'Platoon' of two fathers fighting for the soul of their son. In Platoon it was Tom Berenger and Willem Defoe battling for custody of Charlie Sheen's spirit. In Wallstreet it's Douglas and Martin Sheen representing the 'exciting but evil' and 'wholesome but tedious' ways to go for Charlie Sheen's character. This theme introduces some good tension in the storytelling.
    The other theme that Stone put into this narrative is the bleeding heart "Capitalism is bad and unfair" jingle. "I don't produce anything...I own..." Gekko confesses at one point. "How many boats to water-ski behind do you need? When is it enough?!" cries a shocked Bud Fox. The moral comments on successful capitalists come across somewhat naive and in my opinion don't really work. I won't go into the details but most people I've met who've seen the movie don't even remember what it was about Gordon Gekko that was so wrong. All they remember is the classic "Greed is Good" speech and ironically most of them agree with Gekko on the issue. The fact that Oliver Stone lets Gekko initiate industrial espionage is the reason I gave the movie only four stars instead of five.

    I personally think this was a real blooper. A man in Gekko's position doesn't need the aggravation of blatantly breaking the law. There's a good plot line concerning a fictive company 'Bluestar Airlines' that Gekko has perfectly legal plans with to make himself rich and get scores of hard working people fired that adds enough suspense to the tale. It seems as though Stone was so set on painting a negative picture of egotistical an a-moral Wall-Streeters that he went one bridge too far.

    Fact is that, if anything, this movie is like a recruiting video for Investment Banking. What "Top Gun" did for Naval Aviation "Wall Street" has done for Investment Banking. Big corporate banks have never had to complain about the amount of interested well-educated young hopefuls but nowadays there's probably not one person sitting in any dealing room anywhere in the world who has not seen Wall Street. For one I am convinced that if it wasn't for the scenes that have the camera following runners and stressed out yuppies yelling "How about those September fifties!" I wouldn't have been in this racket.

    The dealing room-scenes are some of the most exhilarating scenes in the history of cinematography. Spielberg immersed audiences with his scenes of Normandy's beaches in '44. Stone creates the same spellbinding grip on the audience without getting anybody shot or brutally maimed. That alone is a great achievement for any director in Hollywood. More so for the man who made a career in gory cinematic violence with the screenplay for 'Scarface' and directing 'Platoon' and 'Natural Born Killers'.

    All Hail Gekko the Great! See this movie again and again. It's full of catchy one-liners that will make you not only the toast of any party but might provide you with more of an energy boost than any Tony Robbins video ever will. "Life all comes down to a few moments, this is one of them..."
    ...more info
  • Pride against the honor?
    Oliver Stone has made his second best movie after JFK, in my opinion with this powerful portrait of greeed and power in the middle of the financial capital of the world.
    Gekko is typical character of those ages. It is not a bad guy, he just follows the rules, bets and wins, so what is the point with that?
    The newcomer, Charlie Sheen is an idealist young man and his epci consists in twist the fate of this ambitious man who thinks he can move all the chess pieces without any risk.
    There is just one complaint of my own. Stone seems just to wash the face to the system he attacks, and somehow this restrained gaze weakens the structure of the script. The good customes and the honesty finally win the game but how long can you smile with this bizarre triumph? and even worst are you sure you can talk about ethics in such atmosphere. Wall Street means risk and failure, competence and disloyalty, no rules just basic instinct if you want to survive.
    There are many common places between this film and Donnie Brasco if you think it carefully. It is the figure of the experience against the youth idealism, but remember Hobbes and forget the innocence in the world. You may become as the central figure of Candide's Voltaire if you think the world is composed bu good and bad boys: the question is survive; no matter how high is the prize you pay by that.
    Michael Douglas made the best achievement of his career to date. A kinetic script and glorious camera work....more info
  • Wall Street's reptile ethics
    "...ladies and gentleman, that greed -- for lack of a better word -- is good.

    Greed is right.

    Greed works.

    Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.

    Greed, in all of its forms -- greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge -- has marked the upward surge of mankind."

    Time to dust off an old classic! Well not so old. After all, the decade that WALL STREET famously and entertainingly captured with it's Reagan-era credo that "greed is good" is still so very much with us in so many ways. And of coarse it is because that is the American way.

    This is one of Oliver Stone's best. Maybe his best. Results are so very mixed with him. As has been said countless times Michael Douglas is superb as one of cinema's all time great villains.

    ...more info
  • The perfect DVD for the perfect film
    Meet Bud Fox(Charlie Sheen),a Wall Street broker. Bud Fox may be young,but despite that, has managed to become a very talented and successful broker. Something that any Wall Street broker would ask for,especially one so young.

    And then, before Bud Fox knows it, he finds his luck taking a turn around the corner. This is when he snares his biggest client, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas). Gordon Gekko is a corporate raider,with a high rolling career. If you are on Wall Street and you find yourself with clients like Gordon Gekko,you are destined for success.

    But,behind closed doors,Gordan Gekko is a man that people don't know. Once Bud Fox discovers this, working under Gekko is going to be a strainlessly and fearful experience that will be hard to escape.

    "Wall Street" is a film that defines the word "perfect". From watching "Wall Street",one is shown how Wall Street works as a business and the dangers of working there. At the same time,"Wall Street" never fails to represent its fiction. "Wall Street" is suspenseful and keeps one wondering what will happen next. The impeccable character chemistry(brought to life by comprehensive acting)move the film along well and balance out the suspense and regular,everyday drama of the film. At the same time,"Wall Street" pays homage to the 80's,showing what the whole "scene" in the 80's was about and documenting the technology of the 80's(as far as cell phones and computers are concerned). Add all of that together with some of the most ravishing film cinematography that you will ever find,and you have the perfect and ideal film out of "Wall Street".

    Having the 20th Anniversary Edition of "Wall Street" on DVD is a real treat. Sure,Oliver Stone's commentary and the "Money Never Sleeps:The Making of Wall Street" documentary have been carried over. But,you do have the weight of the bonus feautures that are to be found on "Wall Street",whether it is learning more about the making of it(Oliver Stone's commentary and "Money Never Sleeps:The Making of Wall Street"),learning how the actors in this film feel about the financial world themselves("Greed is Good"),or getting deleted scenes,along with commentaries for them and a(seperate)introduction by Oliver Stone. So,enjoy the bonus feautures,and don't worry about whether about originality or the act of recycling when going through them.

    If you happen to enjoy nonfiction,suspense,drama,and a large and enjoyable amount of special feautures,you have come to the right place....more info
  • Classic film on the Wall Street excesses of the 1980s
    Brilliant time capsule of the 1980s and Wall Street hustlers in particular, anchored by a riveting performance by Michael Douglas as slash and burn big shot Gordon Gekko. Like Platoon the script is filled with over-the-top dialogue - "Who am I?" says Bud Fox (Gekko's protege played by Charlie Sheen) at one point. Nevertheless Stone captures the excess and furious pace of the period.
    Aside from the film, what makes the 20th Anniversary Edition really worth the price of admission is the "extras":
    - A deeply revealing and frank director's commentary from Stone following on from the excellent ones he has done for Platoon and Born on the Fourth of July.
    - Two documentaries on the making of the film.
    - Deleted scenes including optional commentary from Stone....more info
  • Applies to recent crisis
    Even though this film is over 20 years old it is still relevant.

    It really shows what drives the markets, even with today's stronger regulations.

    Also, it is a great film, with real jeapody and tension.

    It was a large influence on my own film, Capitalism - The Movie....more info
  • wall street is amazing
    the movie shows them the situations and the financial world of a stock broker (Charlie Sheen) and its manager Gekko (Douglas)...more info
  • Simply awful.
    I can't find a positive thing to say about this film. The acting, the plot, the dialogue, it's all completely horrendous. Don't waste your life watching it....more info
  • New extras worth double dipping
    When Oliver Stone made Wall Street, he was riding high from the commercial and critical success of Platoon (Special Edition). His father, Lou Stone, had been a stockbroker on Wall Street in New York City and this film was a son's way of paying tribute to his father. Almost twenty years later, it has become one of the quintessential snapshots of the financial scene in the United States and epitomizes the essence of capitalism, greed and materialism that was so prevalent in the 1980s.

    Michael Douglas owns the role of Gekko and by extension dominates the movie with his larger than life character. He gets most of the film's best dialogue and delivers it with such conviction. There is a scene between Bud and Gekko in a limousine where he tells the younger man how the financial world works, how it operates and lays it all out, pushing Bud hard to go into business with him. It is one of the strongest scenes in the movie because you really believe what Gekko is saying and how Bud could be seduced by his words.

    The culmination of Douglas' performance is his much lauded, often quoted, "Greed is good" speech that his character gives to a shareholders' meeting of Teldar Paper, a company he is planning to take over. He concludes by saying, "Greed is right; greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all of its forms, greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge -- has marked the upward surge of mankind and greed, you mark my words -- will save not only Teldar Paper but that other malfunctioning corporation called the U.S.A." This is one of the best delivered monologues ever put to film as Douglas goes from charming to downright threatening and back again, succinctly summing up the essence of '80 capitalism and greed.

    The original DVD did not have many extras but the quality of what was included was excellent. They have all been carried over to this new release (minus the trailers) but do the new extras really merit a double dip?

    There is an audio commentary by co-writer and director Oliver Stone. Stone talks about Michael Douglas' early struggles with the huge amount of dialogue he had to deliver and how he dealt with it. The filmmaker is candid with his shortcomings and those of others (i.e. Daryl Hannah, Charlie Sheen, etc.). As always, Stone delivers the goods, offering all kinds of fascinating insights into the making of the film.

    The second disc features a new introduction by Oliver Stone that is brief and really should have been put on the first disc.

    Another new extra is "Greed is Good," an hour-long retrospective documentary with Hal Hoolbrook, John C. McGinley, Charlie Sheen and Michael Douglas amongst others returning to offer their impressions of the financial world depicted in the movie. This substantial doc examines the appeal of Gekko and why he inspired people in the business world.

    Also new to this edition is over 20 minutes of deleted scenes with optional commentary by Stone. There is a nice little scene with Penn Jillette of Penn & Teller as one of Bud's clients. Also included is an earlier scene where Bud and Darian (Hannah) meet in a bar but Stone cut it because the Hamptons scene at Gekko's house was stronger. The filmmaker puts all of these scenes into context and why there were cut.

    Finally, carried over from the original edition is "Money Never Sleeps: The Making of Wall Street," a top-notch, 47-minute making of documentary. There is very little overlap with the "Greed is Good" documentary.

    If you're a fan of this film and already own the previous edition, the new extras definitely warrant a double dip. They are quite substantial in nature and shed more light on this excellent film. ...more info
  • Zeitgeist on Film
    Let's start with 2 definitions:

    A. Economics as the rigorous analysis of incentive and utility in any social institution.
    B. Game Theory as the calculus of conflict and cooperation between 2 or more parties.

    Now let us take these precepts as the backdrop of a canonical film that scrutinizes the Reaganomics-fueled roaring 80s and corporate transgression and you get something called "Wall Street," an incredible epic that works because its creator knows that business is ultimately a long game of chess....more info
  • The Business Man's Bible...
    I am the CEO of a big company and although I of course never would do some of the things that go on in this movie, its the kind of movie that gets your business blood pumping! I recently was involved in a big M&A deal and my brother was calling me everyday with some line from the movie... "Greed is Good", "Money Never Sleeps Pal" stuff like that. It was bringing back old memories so I bought him and I each the 20th anniversary edition! What a classic! Its everything you wish you could do but never would!

    Put Michael Douglass with Charlie and Martin Sheen and its a great entertaining movie! First half is priceless with young Bud (Charlie) trying to land the big Whale (Douglas as Gordon Gecko). Greed eventually crosses the line the end is predictable but there is a very good reason why so many businessmen love this movie! Having Daryl Hannah nude in a bedroom scene with Charlie is a "bonus" guy track!

    Give it with Boiler Room as a great one two punch since Boiler Room has a fantastic scene of those actors (Vin Diesel and Giovanni Ribisi) watching Wall Street on TV and acting it out in Vin's living room word for word.

    Great Guy Gift, its timeless and never falls short of entertaining!...more info
  • Capitalist crime
    'Wall Street' must have some authentic merit given the amount of brokers and actual convicted insider traders that worked on the film. Oliver Stone's father was a Wall Street broker from a previous era. In fact Oliver Stone has been a fan and a supporter of the Wall Street world in which he grew up if anyone had taken the time to read any interviews with him. The difference between his father's time and the 80's financial world he was documenting was a rise in the culture of speculation, a system which in relation to his father's business values, creates and produces nothing for society. Indeed Hal Halbrook's character is Stone erecting his father's ghost, the voice of old Wall Street, where capital brought industry, peace and reason.

    Ironically the rise of high profile busts for insider trading in the 80's may have more to do with a more stringent form of policing rather than a rise in financial greed. Reagan took his eye of corporate mergers, allowing the SFC to concentrate on the brash yet ultimatly small fish of insider trading. As corporate mergers got larger and larger, hostile takeovers skyrocketed and the rise of the parasite financers living off the buying selling of others was here to stay.

    Gordon Gekko's "greed is good" speech has been quoted in more T.V., newspaper and magazine retrospectives of the 80's than I care to remember. There are few characters in modern cinema who have had such a divisive response. Seen as a villain by many and a hero by many others. Gekko is a perfect symbol of the economic and political divide of the 80's...more info
  • Stone, Sheen, Sheen, and Douglas Before They Sucked
    ...way back in '87, created a little morality play called Wall Street that packs quite a punch. Some films become dated when they deal with relatively recent eras - this one is set during the 80's junk bond fueled bull market. This one doesn't suck, in fact it seems to have improved with age, somehow. Flash forward to the Enron, corportate CEO scandals, and its themes are as relevant as ever. Douglas creates one of the most memorable villans in recent film history in Gekko the Great, investment banker/robber baron. Great script, performances, and direction - and some classic one-liners from Douglas. If you don't like Douglas, Stone, or either of the Sheens, see it anyway. If you saw it back in the '80's it's a great film to revisit. Wall Street is a classic. ...more info
  • The Greatest Business Film Ever Made
    This is, quite simply, the greatest film ever made about business and the capital markets. Wall Street is brilliant and infinitely quotable. There are just so many good lines in the film delivered to perfection by Michael Douglas. This is certainly Michael Douglas' best work, for which he most deservedly won the Oscar. The acting, writing, and directing are phenomenal and culminated in a true masterpiece. This is my favorite film; I have watched it more than a dozen times and I always enjoy the ride and discover new subtleties. Not only did I buy the original version, but I also bought the 20th anniversary edition too. Anybody who has any interest in the stock market or business must own this film; it has become a cult classic. I am looking forward to the sequel "Money Never Sleeps". I hope that the filmakers will aspire to the quality and caliber of the original. ...more info
  • Wall Street is a Classic Film
    Wall Street is a classic film that still has many things to say to people today. Oddly, and unfortunately, it seems even more appropriate today than it did when it was released....more info
  • GREED IS GOOD, BUT IS THE MOVIE?
    Not having a strong interest or knowledge in the world of stocks and bonds, WALL STREET failed to provide me with a satisfying cinematic experience. Though I have been a fan of Michael Douglas for some time, it seems strange that he won an Oscar for a film in which he has little real screen time. Most of the movie focuses on Charlie Sheen's character, and even though Douglas is perfect in the role of Gordon Gekko, I wasn't overwhelmed by his performance. He won that year over William Hurt (Broadcast News); Marcello Mastroianni (Dark Eyes), Jack Nicholson (Ironweed) and Robin Williams (Good Morning Vietnam). Assuredly, Douglas embodied the corporate greed of Gekko, but it is ultimately a one note performance, without any shadings of real personality. Charlie, meanwhile, in one of his first major roles, is only about 50% effective, and his power comes in the scenes he shares with his father, Martin, who played his father in the film. There are nice supporting turns from James Karen as the duplicitous sales manager; John C. McGinley as Charlie's sometime buddy broker; Terence Stamp as Gekko's British rival; James Spader as a yuppie lawyer; and of course Martin as Charlie's father whom he betrays. Daryl Hannah is awful in a one-note role as Douglas' ex-mistress and Sheen's current honey. Sixties ingenue Millie Perkins has an all too brief cameo as Charlie's mother in the final ten minutes of the movie.
    Oliver Stone's movies have always been provocative and WALL STREET is no different. But I have always found myself disturbed by his movies in that they are not the most "entertaining" of films; there's always a message, and this time, the one that "greed is good" just doesn't fill the bill for me. Michael Douglas has given enough great performances that this Oscar to me rewards his body of work rather than this one role....more info
  • Wall Street is a Classic
    One of my favorite movies of all time. Made in the mid 80's, the lessons of money and greed on Wall Street reverberates more than ever in these tough economic times. A must see for everyone....more info
  • The Disease of Accumulation
    WALL STREET is Stone's best film. Better than PLATOON. Better than JFK. Better than NATURAL BORN KILLERS. I can't believe how little praise it gets.

    WALL STREET is more than just an indictment of the 80's. It's a treatise on wealth and how quickly it makes you rationalize behavior you didn't think you were capable of. Obviously, this is a relevant lesson in any era.

    Plenty of other film have attempted to preach this same message. Most of them have failed. And even the good ones don't contain anything that can compare to the scene where Sheen gets busted. Or Gordon's famous "Greed is good" speech (sounds a lot like what we're hearing about globalization, doesn't it?).

    Anyway, WALL STREET is a film that muckrakes as it entertains. How many movies can you say that about?...more info

  • comparison of stock market 20 years on
    I was reminded of the movie Wall Street mentioned referred to when reading Liars' Poker a book about bond trading scams. I was amazed to see that another market crash, this time Prime Mortgage could re-occur there seems to be someone always ready to seize the opportunity to make a quick buck and not give a damn about the consequences. Just like Michael Douglas's character says "I just move the money around". Very compelling viewing and a warning to where you put your stocks and investments. Here in Australia the lending and valuation legislation is much tighter and harder to get a loan, although there are people now lending money to those who cannot afford it, Difference is the properties are not overvalued and the lending bodies just re-possess the property....more info