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The Culture Clash: A Revolutionary New Way to Understanding the Relationship Between Humans and Domestic Dogs
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Product Description

*The Culture Clash is special. Written in Jean's inimitably informal yet precise lecture style, the book races along on par with a good thriller. *The Culture Clash depicts dogs as they really are - stripped of their Hollywood fluff, with their loveable 'can I eat it, chew it, urinate on it, what's in it for me' philosophy. Jean's tremendous affection for dogs shines through at all times, as does her keen insight into the dog's mind. Relentlessly she champions the dog's point of view, always showing concern for their education and well being. Without a doubt, Jean's book is the hottest doggy item on the market. Best Training Book Of The Year! (Maxwell Award)

Customer Reviews:

  • Condescention Clash
    Ms. Donaldson's book drips of condescension. For example, on page 61 she tells the reader to "pound this into your brain: dogs are animals."

    If you think your dog is a person, and you need a pompous author to point out to you over and over that it is not, this is your book.

    If you are a dog lover who wants to develop healthy and fun behaviors between you and your dog, every other book out there is a better choice.

    In addition to the number of wonderful dog training books out there I recommend you consider reading Stanley Coren's book "How to Speak Dog". He will explain all the things the dogs ears say by their various postions, he will explain the meaning of head position, tail movement, lip curl, etc. Mr Coren is respectful to both animals and to readers.

    His book is especially valuable when you see your dog interact with other dogs. No book on training will tell you what your dog is thinking like Mr. Coren's....more info
  • 2005 UPDATED EDITION is available but not sold on Amazon
    This is the most significant dog book ever written -- yes, it's that good. Everyone who owns a dog should read it. I'll let you read the other reviews to hear why. But you should know that there is a revised edition (with 11,000 more words) available, though for some reason Amazon isn't selling it. ...more info
  • Culture Clash -- Hope the revised edition reads better
    I have to agree with a lot of the reviews already posted: Good book bad organization (very bad tone in the overall scheme of the book). Culture Clash is the fourth in a series of dog/training books that I ordered from amazon (fourth to Patricia McConnell's Other end of the leash; The Dog Whisperer (not Cesar Millan); and Ian Dunbar's Teach an new dog old tricks and I have to say I am glad that I waited to read this one.

    On the positive side: She drives home the point that dogs are not human (not furry humans, not babies, not spiteful)--this is perhaps the number one concept that gets us "melon-brains", into trouble when bringing home a new pup or as she refers to them, the "lemon-brains." We forget that those big beautiful canines are their defense mechanism and that they will use them when necessary.

    On the negative side: She drives this point in such a arrogant, self-righteous tone that it's annoying to read (as if she wasn't a melon-brained monkey herself). I find myself skipping over the redundant ranting to get to the fleshy ideas she has to offer. For someone who stresses "positive" "humane" and "gentle" training her words and how they are organized leave me feeling like my choke chain has been pulled and yanked (sometimes i feel like I swallowed broken glass).

    On the positive side: Gives some ideas and techniques that are gentle and focus on positive reinforcement.
    On the negative side: You have to dig into the text and into the chapters (well into chapter 5 and 6) to find them. also the only set of pictures is at the back but they were of no use to me. its not the typical how to book.

    Patricia McConnell (animal behaviorist) in her book Other End of the Leash, really delves (in a well written and organized manner) into the research and gives concrete examples of research that supports her argument (same "dogs aren't human--so don't treat them as human" concept)and is so human and humane and truly witty. The data really builds McConnell's credibility as a behaviorist. McConnell calls us humans "monkeys."

    Donaldson calls us humans "melon-brains." It seems like Donaldson's book is just a book of opinions w/little research data to support it. I'm reading chapters 5 and 6 but in retrospect, I cannot recall scientific data to support her argument.

    I don't find Culture Clash by Jean Donaldson "witty" at all. Donaldson attempts a "what if" scenario by putting the humans in the dogs' place where the humans depended on these creatures called Grons (not unlike dogs depend on us humans). She goes on to question, how would you feel if all those natural behaviors, such as smiling, using the toilet, reading the newspaper were behaviors that the Grons didn't approve of (not unlike humans don't approve of chewing, excessive barking, and soiling the carpet). After a LOOOOONG and drawn out description of problem behaviors that lead to aggression (not unlike that found in a frustrated, confused, and under-socialized dog), the story ends sadly with the human being taken to Donaldson's version of the "shelter" to be euthanized because of such aggression.

    I found the story stupid and drawn out to make a simple point: communication and training with a dog (while isn't not rocket science)it takes time, effort, and responsibility on the part of the owner. I wish she would get to the point (for a melon-brained money, i'm thinking a lot more simply, like a dog).

    That's concept is what this book is supposed to be about: dogs don't think in such a complicated manner. Dogs close the gap between themselves and piece of food, they don't calculate calories. Dog increase the gap between themselves and a scary person/object/situation they don't analyze it to death.

    Having said that: Good concept and idea--bad, BAD, BAD presentation. ...more info
  • "Positive Training" = A Negative Learning Experience?

    I admire Jean Donaldson and her ideas. And what a pleasure it was to read something by a trainer who has a "so what?" attitude toward the "rules" about showing your dog you're alpha. She really sticks it to trainers whose techniques rely too much on the old alpha myth* (which accounts for the two stars, above). But what Donaldson fails to realize is that operant conditioning is almost as big a myth as the alpha theory (which accounts for there only being two stars).

    One of her main points is that "traditional" training (meaning dominance) creates negative side-effects, which is the main reason I gave up using those techniques years ago (in 1992) and turned to operant conditioning as a possible alternative. What I found, though, is that not all behavior can be learned (or unlearned) through conditioning. I also found that instinctive behaviors tend to override conditioned ones, and that a training system based primarily on food rewards (and by extension, clickers, since their effectiveness is dependant on the association made between the click and being given a food treat) can also create a negative learning experience for a dog. The truth is, food makes for a great inducement for most behaviors, but it's a rather shaky reinforcement.

    Someone reading this might say: Wait, go back a second. Did you just say that food rewards create a negative learning experience? That's impossible to believe. I mean, after all, it's called positive reinforcement, right?

    Yes, but "operant conditioning" works best when you use INTRINSIC REINFORCERS, meaning they're directly related to the behavior being learned. And food is not directly related to any obedience behavior other than sitting on command, or to a lesser degree to coming when called. On the other hand, EXTRINSIC REINFORCERS, which is what food usually is, don't work as well. Not only that but, according to the behavioral textbooks, extrinsic reinforcers can actually undermine the effectiveness of intrinsic reinforcers or just plain ruin the learning process entirely. How positive is that?

    Imagine you're a dog and you have strong instincts to chase things and bite them. That's what really floats your boat. The dominance trainer says, "Don't use your predatory energy or I'll punish you," and the dog learns to obey by repressing those instincts, which leaves him feeling unfulfilled. The clicker trainer says, "There's no need to use that energy-look! I've got a cookie!" And the dog learns to obey by giving up what he really loves for some instant gratification of a lesser kind. And although his tummy is now full he still feels empty inside. A smart trainer would say, "What great instincts you have! Let's play a game that lets you use them by obeying my commands!" And the dog learns to obey because it just feels good, naturally. He feels totally happy and emotionally fulfilled because the reinforcement is built into the learning process and, thus, into the behavior itself.

    So, which of these models of learning is really the most positive for the dog? And which is the most effective?

    Nobel Prize winning biologist Konrad Lorenz said, "All animals learn best through play." So while I'd read CULTURE CLASH for a fresh viewpoint about dogs, I definitely wouldn't use it as a training manual. Buy a copy of PLAY TRAINING YOUR DOG by Patricia Gail Burnham, instead. Or better yet, try the more comprehensive NATURAL DOG TRAINING, by Kevin Behan. Both methods work via intrinsic reinforcers. It's kind of like the difference between learning something slowly and painfully by rote, through endless repetitions, and learning it instantly and permanently by being "in the zone."

    *(The top wolf experts don't even like to use the word alpha anymore because, as Dr. L. David Mech puts it, "it falsely implies a hierarchical system." (Canadian Journal of Zoology, 2002). No Alpha Wolf + No Hierarchy = No Alpha Theory.)
    ...more info
  • UNDERSTANDING dogs
    While not a step-by-step "how to train your dog" book, thus the word "understanding" in the title, the material covered here gives the handler/trainer/owner tools for understanding the behavior of dogs and the rules of operant conditioning. This allows one to use their own creativity and intelligence in working with their individual personality and their dog's invdividual personality. Cookie cutter "how to" books can't possibly cover all complex behavior issues and contingencies in a dog's environment. Neither can this book but it teaches you what to look for in your dog's innate behavior and how it reacts to its environment.

    I would suggest that the 'lay' person start with the chapter labeled 'It's All Chew Toys To Them.' If you read nothing more than this chapter, you would have great insight into understanding how to communicate with your dog and your money would be well spent. Most likely you'll be inspired to read other chapters.

    If this material is too in-depth, a prerequisite reading would be 'Don't Shoot the Dog' by Karen Pryor.

    Thank you for educating yourself about man's best friend!...more info
  • Best book on dog behavior I've ever read
    I considered myself pretty progressive regarding dog training and behavior and then I read this book and realized I needed to update my thinking even more. The book is so good I bought 5 more to give to my friends with dogs. I STRONGLY recommend it to anyone who owns a dog. It is really worth the read. After you read this book, then move on to clicker training books - especially anything by Karen Pryor. Using clicker training (discussed in Culture Clash as well), I was able to train my 7 week old Aussie puppy how to sit, down, give paw, "attention," and "touch" (target) my hand, in about 3-5 minutes for each command. If you love your dogs, read these books and train them well.
    ...more info
  • Too Extreme, No Balance


    Ms. Donaldson takes a judgemental moralistic view of owners (like me)who like that their dogs do not bolt through doors before them, or like to eat before their dogs, and like to be their dog's leader. She even goes as far as to call us *stupid*. Okay, I draw the line when I spend $15.00 to buy a book then the author calls me stupid in the first chapter.

    I train in AKC competition obedience so I am all for reward based training. Dogs do learn faster when rewarded for doing the right behavior as opposed to being corrected for the wrong behavior. However, it is incomplete advice when Ms. Donaldson tells people that dogs should never receive any corrections. Maybe those highly skilled behaviorists and professional dog trainers have the talent, time, experience to only train with rewards but the average pet owner will never be able to accomplish this without years of trial and error. I am sorry, but I do not want to spend 5 years just to train my dog to not bolt out the door or decide to chase a squirrel and possibly get hit by a car.

    She is far to extreme in one direction. Like everythig in life, there needs to be a balance. And by the way, I am not in Cesar's camp either with his flooding methods and overly simplistic dominance fix-all solution either. Like I said, you've got to have balance and adjust with each dog.

    If you interested in dog training and learning theory I liked Don't Shoot the Dog by Karen Pryor much better. The author uses easy to understand human analagies to illustrate learning theory. I am a very literal and visual person so if I could understand it, anyone can. ...more info
  • For Anyone That Really Wants To Understand Dog Behavior
    My dog-eared, worn-cover, beaten up copy of The Culture Clash, signed by Jean Donaldson Oct. 5, 1997, is one of my most prized books in my dog training library. I've had the great opportunity to attend her seminars and listen to her speak on a few occasions. It's a book that is required reading for any serious student of dog behavior. It's also great for anyone just interested in learning more about dog behavior and training. Let me explain why:

    1. The book opens with "Getting The Dog's Perspective - Walt Disney vs. B.F. Skinner" and goes on to explain that dogs are amoral animals, that they have no understanding of right and wrong. She adds that dogs don't spite us, get back at us or feel guilty for doing "bad behavior." When we believe that our dogs are getting back at us, or trying to spite us, they end up getting a lot of punishment.

    Think about it, you come home after a long day at work only to find your favorite $200 pair of shoes chewed to bits. If you think your dog did that to "get back at you" you would dole out a nice big dose of punishment. In reality, your dog was stressed at being left alone and chewed to relieve the stress. The next day you leave for work and your dog feeling stressed again, chews your kitchen chairs. You walk in the house and think, "He did it again to ME!" Severe punishment follows.

    If this happens again and again the behavior is likely to get worse. In reality, your dog is not associating the chewing with his behavior. The chewing is a direct result of your behavior. Your dog associates the punishment with your homecoming. You walk in the door and pound him - this sets up a behavioral history. When you walk out the door there is a good chance that when you come back in a beating will follow.

    Everyday you leave and your dog learns that when you come home he is going to be punished. It's all very stressful. How does the dog relieve stress - CHEWING!

    Jean Donaldson explains this process so well and really gives you insights into why your dog is behaving a certain way.

    2. Chapter 2 continues with the fact that dogs are predatory animals, that they are hard wired to search, stalk, rush, chase, bite/hold/shake/kill, and to dissect and eat(prey). This chapter is particularly important because of the writing on tug-o-war, the most misunderstood game in "dogdom".

    In addition to tug-o-war, she discusses alone training, chew training and a lot more.

    3. Chapter 3 on Socialization, Conflict Resolution, Fear and Aggression goes on to give some of the best advice for new puppy owners. The sections on bite inhibition, timid puppies, dog-dog socialization, food bowl exercises, object exchanges, and the bite threshold model is a must read for any new puppy owner.

    4. Chapter 4 - Its All Chew Toys To Them, starts off with the story of The Gorns. The Gorns is an excellent story of putting us in the position of dogs. Humans are kept as companion animals to a more intellectually sophisticated species.

    Imagine living on a planet with a Gorn and this Gorn punishes you for doing normal human behavior like: Shaking hands, sitting on couches, eating anything but "Human Chow," etc.

    Think about dogs, they get punished for sniffing each others butts (human equilevlent to shaking hands), sitting on the couch, trying to eat anything other than the food from a bag that we feed them. This is a very eye-opening chapter.

    5. Chapter 5 is the one chapter that I think makes a lot of people upset - "Lemon Brains But We Still Love Them." The first paragraph of this chapter she states:

    "The enmeshment between dog owners and Walt Disney has been too tight to allow behaviorism in. We've been clinging to the wish that dogs might just have big, convoluted, melon brains like humans and have a natural desire to please. The fact of the matter is dogs have little, smoothish lemon brains and are looking out for number one. I personally still like them."

    It's an excellent chapter that goes on to explain how behaviors are taught. Much of what has been taught on dog training is false. For years dog owners have been told that when a dog does NOT do the command the dog is being dominant. The dog owner is then instructed to be "The Alpha" and apply appropriate force, setting up a negative situation between dog and owner. If we truly believe that the dog has a natural desire to please, then the dog should want to do it for us.

    On the other hand, if we take a realistic view and understand that as Jean states, `They are looking out for number one," we figure out what the proper motivation is to teach the dog to do the command.

    6. The final chapter finishes up with instructions on how to teach your dog obedience commands starting with kindergarten levels and working up to PhD levels.

    The relationship between dogs and humans is a long one. It's time that we stop expecting our dogs to think like us and learn to think like our dogs.

    Is it any reason that we have 56 million dog bites every year in the United States? The only way were going to make that number go down is to read books like Jean Donaldson's book, The Culture Clash....more info
  • REQUIRED K9 READING
    REQUIRED K9 READING and the FIRST BOOK you should thoroughly review on you canine companions. If you are in contact with, have or plan to get a dog, PLEASE, please read this book. You, your dog, and the world will be a better, happier, and safer place. End of Story....more info
  • A good book that is a little too wordy.
    I liked the book but it really seems more like a text book. I think it could be simplified to turn it in to an easier read....more info
  • the only 100% truly necessary book for dog owners
    the title says it.

    this is not a training book, but a psychology book - one that helps you get inside your dog's head to know HOW and WHY our best friends do what they do. it will allow you & your dog to get along much better, and you'll both be happier that way! plus, a thorough read by anyone with at least a marginal level of intelligence may even allow you to forgo structured obedience classes.

    i have read and re-read this many times over the years, and it is the one dog-related book that i always buy for new dog owners as a gift. ...more info
  • For Anyone That Really Wants To Understand Dog Behavior
    My dog-eared, worn-cover, beaten up copy of The Culture Clash, signed by Jean Donaldson Oct. 5, 1997, is one of my most prized books in my dog training library. I've had the great opportunity to attend her seminars and listen to her speak on a few occasions. It's a book that is required reading for any serious student of dog behavior. It's also great for anyone just interested in learning more about dog behavior and training. Let me explain why:

    1. The book opens with "Getting The Dog's Perspective - Walt Disney vs. B.F. Skinner" and goes on to explain that dogs are amoral animals, that they have no understanding of right and wrong. She adds that dogs don't spite us, get back at us or feel guilty for doing "bad behavior." When we believe that our dogs are getting back at us, or trying to spite us, they end up getting a lot of punishment.

    Think about it, you come home after a long day at work only to find your favorite $200 pair of shoes chewed to bits. If you think your dog did that to "get back at you" you would dole out a nice big dose of punishment. In reality, your dog was stressed at being left alone and chewed to relieve the stress. The next day you leave for work and your dog feeling stressed again, chews your kitchen chairs. You walk in the house and think, "He did it again to ME!" Severe punishment follows.

    If this happens again and again the behavior is likely to get worse. In reality, your dog is not associating the chewing with his behavior. The chewing is a direct result of your behavior. Your dog associates the punishment with your homecoming. You walk in the door and pound him - this sets up a behavioral history. When you walk out the door there is a good chance that when you come back in a beating will follow.

    Everyday you leave and your dog learns that when you come home he is going to be punished. It's all very stressful. How does the dog relieve stress - CHEWING!

    Jean Donaldson explains this process so well and really gives you insights into why your dog is behaving a certain way.

    2. Chapter 2 continues with the fact that dogs are predatory animals, that they are hard wired to search, stalk, rush, chase, bite/hold/shake/kill, and to dissect and eat(prey). This chapter is particularly important because of the writing on tug-o-war, the most misunderstood game in "dogdom".

    In addition to tug-o-war, she discusses alone training, chew training and a lot more.

    3. Chapter 3 on Socialization, Conflict Resolution, Fear and Aggression goes on to give some of the best advice for new puppy owners. The sections on bite inhibition, timid puppies, dog-dog socialization, food bowl exercises, object exchanges, and the bite threshold model is a must read for any new puppy owner.

    4. Chapter 4 - Its All Chew Toys To Them, starts off with the story of The Gorns. The Gorns is an excellent story of putting us in the position of dogs. Humans are kept as companion animals to a more intellectually sophisticated species.

    Imagine living on a planet with a Gorn and this Gorn punishes you for doing normal human behavior like: Shaking hands, sitting on couches, eating anything but "Human Chow," etc.

    Think about dogs, they get punished for sniffing each others butts (human equilevlent to shaking hands), sitting on the couch, trying to eat anything other than the food from a bag that we feed them. This is a very eye-opening chapter.

    5. Chapter 5 is the one chapter that I think makes a lot of people upset - "Lemon Brains But We Still Love Them." The first paragraph of this chapter she states:

    "The enmeshment between dog owners and Walt Disney has been too tight to allow behaviorism in. We've been clinging to the wish that dogs might just have big, convoluted, melon brains like humans and have a natural desire to please. The fact of the matter is dogs have little, smoothish lemon brains and are looking out for number one. I personally still like them."

    It's an excellent chapter that goes on to explain how behaviors are taught. Much of what has been taught on dog training is false. For years dog owners have been told that when a dog does NOT do the command the dog is being dominant. The dog owner is then instructed to be "The Alpha" and apply appropriate force, setting up a negative situation between dog and owner. If we truly believe that the dog has a natural desire to please, then the dog should want to do it for us.

    On the other hand, if we take a realistic view and understand that as Jean states, `They are looking out for number one," we figure out what the proper motivation is to teach the dog to do the command.

    6. The final chapter finishes up with instructions on how to teach your dog obedience commands starting with kindergarten levels and working up to PhD levels.

    The relationship between dogs and humans is a long one. It's time that we stop expecting our dogs to think like us and learn to think like our dogs.

    Is it any reason that we have 56 million dog bites every year in the United States? The only way were going to make that number go down is to read books like Jean Donaldson's book, The Culture Clash....more info
  • Dogs aren't "furry people"
    Many dog owners regard their dogs as "furry people" or children. I LOVE my dogs but they are wonderful in their own right as dogs. This book explains in an entertaining way why dogs should be allowed to be dogs and helps people understand why this is better.

    It's a standard reference book for dog enthusiasts....more info
  • A great training book, but marred by its self-righteous tone
    Jean Donaldson has a winner with the Culture Clash. The book is packed from cover to cover with useful information, with scarcely a page lacking some nugget of training wisdom. I have to admit that when I first found this book, I read it straight through twice (once while taking notes!) and then returned it late to the library because I was constantly referring back to it. It really is that good.

    The main theme of 'The Culture Clash' is a plea for us to honestly understand the motives of our canine companions, instead of seeing them through the distorting lens of anthromorphism. Ms Donaldson is a behaviourist, and includes a lot of information on operant conditioning and learning theory in this text. However, the book also teaches us how to apply this theory - included are a wealth of practical suggestions on how to live with and train your dog. The theory and practical in 'The Culture Clash' are equally good, and I do not exaggerate when I say that many individual chapters would alone be worth the purchase price of the book. Ms Donaldson leaves us understanding not only how to train our dogs, but also exactly why we are doing what she says.

    So why not five stars? The content of this book is inspired, but unfortunately Ms Donaldson shoots herself in the foot with her sanctimonious tone. Ms Donaldson champions the effectiveness of positive reinforcement when changing behaviour, so it is strange that she feels the need to resort to punishing her audience so much. Dog trainers who use punishment are variously labelled "pathetic", "cruel" and accused of finding personal gratification by punishing dogs. Choke chains are not called by their proper name, but are melodramatically renamed "strangle collars". Trainers who believe in pack theory are "too stupid for words". The vast majority of owners will find this approach alienating. If punishment really is that ineffective and morally bankrupt, then why must she continually resort to it throughout the book to blugeon her hapless readers?

    Ms Donaldson could also use a little education on the subject of canine drives. Unpleasant as it may be for a behaviourist to admit, it is easy to see that domestic dogs have intense inborn genetic drives, and good training exploits these desires in a much more sophisticated way than outlined by Ms Donaldson. Unfortunately, this truth doesn't fit Ms Donaldon's behaviourist paradigm at all. Instead of rewarding in drive, she treats all rewards as equivalent, which in turn results in her promoting a couple of quite unlikely techniques.

    It is also concerning that Ms Donaldson seems a little confused about her own stance on the use of punishment. She has a helpful and well-thought out chapter on the proper and appropriate uses of punishment when training dogs. And her methods include a great deal of punishment - she regularly prescribes negative punishment and "no reward markers" to her dogs. On the other hand, positive punishment is given the thumbs down, and negative reinforcement is a definate no-no. Ms Donaldson fails to explain why negative punishment is so much less damaging to a dog than positive punishment - I imagine many dogs would rather be verbally reprimanded than denied dinner or isolated from their human family for any period of time. One gets the feeling that negative punishment is sometimes promoted as 'better' than positive punishment not because of its effect on the dogs concerned, but merely because Ms Donaldson feels more comfortable using it.

    If I could have given this book four and a half stars, I would have. I honestly believe that any dog owner or trainer could benefit from a read of this book; it is one of the very best dog training manuals published so far. In fact, in a perfect world, all new dog owners would recieve a complimentary copy of 'The Culture Clash' when they collected their new puppy! Here's hoping one day this book will be re-edited and re-published, so that it retains the gems of information while losing the occasional blunders and distractingly spiteful tone.

    ...more info
  • A good starting point, but we should be well beyond it by now
    When I read this book the first time, I really enjoyed it and felt that it had changed most of my ideas about dog training. Everything Donaldson says is correct and works for most behaviors, because she uses basic principles that can be applied to any animal. Basically, if you understand positive and negative reinforcement/punishment, there is no need to read this book. Her main point is that you can get dogs to do whatever you wish using positive reinforcement alone, and the use of aversives is unnecessary and a result of expecting our dogs to be smarter than they really are.

    She also gives some good insight into the behavior of dogs, such as bite thresholds, and it's very useful for people to know that just because a dog bites doesn't mean it is evil and should be put down - it's NORMAL dog behavior.

    Unfortunately, I could only give it one star because her theory is very limited and basic. It is helpful for someone with no knowledge of canine behavior, thought process, or pack mentality, and for the many people who misuse aversives and think it is normal for you to be able to punch a dog in the face and not have him bite you. It is a good starting place, and nothing more.

    But for the rest of us who wish to understand the true behavior and potential of dogs, her book is of little value. Clicker training and an endless supply of treats works great for training specific behaviors, but not for achieving harmony and balance in the bigger picture. Not to mention the many breeds who are not food or play motivated, which she never addresses. Also, for those true problem dogs who are aggressive or have other serious behavior issues, she never says how to address these problems, and instead recommends other books!

    There are countless better books out there that are much more in depth and educational. This book only detracted from my knowledge of dog behavior and training.
    ...more info
  • A Masterpiece
    If I were going to buy only one dog training book this would be it. I especially liked the first chapter and the section on Planet Gorn (Chapter 4). I'm not comfortable using pain to train pet dogs, so I really appreciate her painless techniques and the way she goes beyond myths and examines the real science and evidence....more info
  • Best Dog Training Book Ever
    Everyone with a dog, or thinking of getting a dog, even people who think they know everything about dogs, should read this book! You'll never look at them the same, and you'll be the better for it!

    If your dog doesn't respond to the clicker noise/device, just substitute a happy, zesty, cheerful "yes!" or something else quick and enthusiastic.

    Finally we can all give up the idea that they did something bad "to get back at us!"...more info