Geronimo - An American Legend
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Product Description

Walter Hill's revisionist take on the American cavalry's campaign to capture renegade Chiricahua Apache warrior Geronimo (Wes Studi) is, like Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven, a dark tale that both celebrates and critiques myths of the American West. Despite its title, Geronimo is really about the American cavalry officers who undertake the responsibility of recapturing the warrior, in particular the young narrator Lt. Charles Gatewood (Jason Patric), a Civil War hero who respects the great Geronimo and brokers a treaty with the Chiricahua, only to see it collapse when the army kills the tribal medicine man. Gene Hackman plays Gen. George Crook, the proud but sympathetic officer charged with bringing in the renegades who take to hills after the killing. Robert Duvall, the tough, racist army scout and Indian fighter Charlie Sieber, practically steals the picture with his cagey, underplayed performance. More complex and complicated than most Westerns, this is a Walter Hill film through and through: lean, ironic, beautiful to look at (it was shot on location against the astounding landscape of southeastern Utah), and driven by a wonderful Ry Cooder score. Don't confuse this with the 1993 TNT cable film by the same name; it confounded many viewers at the time of its release and may have been at least partially responsible for its box-office disappointment. --Sean Axmaker

Customer Reviews:

  • THUMBS UP FOR GERORNIMO
    This movie was AWESOME and the actors, etc. were the BEST!!!! I'm glad I purchased it. We're HUGE Robert Duvall fans and were VERY pleased he was in it.The location where the movie was filmed was SO pretty,thumbs up all the way on this one!!!! : ) ...more info
  • Geronimo
    This movie was excellent, Rodney Grant and Wes Studi really capture the essence of the story. ...more info
  • AS FAIR AS HOLLYWOOD GETS
    A fair look at the clash of white-Indian civilization was in John Milius' excellent "Geronimo", the story of the last Apache captured and brought in, bringing to an end the Indian Wars in 1890. Gene Hackman plays the officer charged with negotiating and capturing Geronimo. It fairly shows brave Indians, a well-meaning government, circumstances that were beyond control of the ability to foresee, white settlers whose ingenuity made use of the land that was previously unheard of, and how these events brought about bad feelings in the Indian community. The film is even without demonizing either side....more info
  • Geronimo
    This is a great movie..The first movie that I ever saw Robert Duvall die in, great stuff....more info
  • Touching scenes and dialogues + Gripping acting + Good action = One of the 3 best western movies I've ever seen.
    It contains touching scenes and dialogues. For example, all the Apache Indian Scouts of the American Army were stripped of their guns and sent to "reservation area" after Geromino surrrendered. They were treated like traitors even though they had loyally served the Army.

    In another scene, Geromino (Wes Studi) said "Do not hate each other. We have so few people left now".

    In another one, Geromino asked Gen. George Crook (Gene Hackman) "Why your people have to take all the land? There is so much land. Why the Indians can't have any?"

    The shooting scenes are fast, and deadly but there are few. This more a drama than an action Western.

    The acting is gripping. Gene Hackman is convincing as Gen. George Crook. Jason Patric is so moving and admirable as the real Lt. Charles Gatewood. Wes Studi is physically and spiritually strong, emotionally-stirring with his words.

    This movie contains many facts. For example, Lt. Charles Gatewood was deliberately sent to obscuration by a jealous General. Geromino died in reservation area. He was never allowed to leave it even though he was promised that in the treaty.

    This is one of the 3 best western movies I've ever seen. The others are: Quigley Down under and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    ...more info
  • AS FAIR AS HOLLYWOOD GETS
    A fair look at the clash of white-Indian civilization was in John Milius' excellent "Geronimo", the story of the last Apache captured and brought in, bringing to an end the Indian Wars in 1890. Gene Hackman plays the officer charged with negotiating and capturing Geronimo. It fairly shows brave Indians, a well-meaning government, circumstances that were beyond control of the ability to foresee, white settlers whose ingenuity made use of the land that was previously unheard of, and how these events brought about bad feelings in the Indian community. The film is even without demonizing either side....more info
  • Geronimo
    This is a great movie..The first movie that I ever saw Robert Duvall die in, great stuff....more info
  • Touching scenes and dialogues + Gripping acting + Good action = One of the 3 best western movies I've ever seen.
    It contains touching scenes and dialogues. For example, all the Apache Indian Scouts of the American Army were stripped of their guns and sent to "reservation area" after Geromino surrrendered. They were treated like traitors even though they had loyally served the Army.

    In another scene, Geromino (Wes Studi) said "Do not hate each other. We have so few people left now".

    In another one, Geromino asked Gen. George Crook (Gene Hackman) "Why your people have to take all the land? There is so much land. Why the Indians can't have any?"

    The shooting scenes are fast, and deadly but there are few. This more a drama than an action Western.

    The acting is gripping. Gene Hackman is convincing as Gen. George Crook. Jason Patric is so moving and admirable as the real Lt. Charles Gatewood. Wes Studi is physically and spiritually strong, emotionally-stirring with his words.

    This movie contains many facts. For example, Lt. Charles Gatewood was deliberately sent to obscuration by a jealous General. Geromino died in reservation area. He was never allowed to leave it even though he was promised that in the treaty.

    This is one of the 3 best western movies I've ever seen. The others are: Quigley Down under and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
    ...more info
  • Great cast for historical period piece
    Geronimo: An American Legend has gone mostly under the radar since its release in 1993, but it's an above average historical movie that tries to show the truth in history instead of how movies usually portray it. In the 1880s, the U.S. Cavalry persuades Apache chief Geronimo to surrender and live on the reservation at Turkey Creek. But with a new life forced on him, Geronimo is uncomfortable and when a medicine man is shot down for inciting the tribe, the chief leaves the reservation with a band of warriors. The cavalry must now get back in the field, patroling the Southwest in hopes of catching the renegade chief. Like many good westerns, this movie deals with the changing times and how individuals dealt with those changes. We are shown both perspectives, the cavalry and Geronimo, so it's a balanced movie overall. It's not an action movie although the battle scenes are well-done, instead it's more of a character study of all the participants as the cavalry tries to bring Geronimo in to live on the reservation. An underrated, very well-done movie.

    Leading an impressive ensemble cast, Jason Patric plays Lt. Charles Gatewood, a cavalry officer who respects the Apaches even as he fights them. It is this respect that leads to a friendship with Geronimo. Patric plays the part well as an officer who feels conflicted with what he's been ordered to do. Gene Hackman gives support as General George Crook, the commander of the cavalry forced to capture the Apache chief. Not a huge part for Hackman, but still a really good one. Robert Duvall almost steals the movie as Al Sieber, the veteran scout who's come to despise the Apaches even though he sees many similarities between them and himself. Wes Studi is excellent as Geronimo, the Apache chief who struggles to change with the times as the cavalry moves ever closer to catching him. And in one of his first movies, a young Matt Damon plays 2nd Lt. Britton Davis, an inexperienced officer who gains that experience on the Geronimo campaign. Those five leads share the screentime and carry the movie. The excellent supporting cast includes Steve Reevis as Chato, an Apache scout for the cavalry, Rodney Grant as Mangas, a close friend of Geronimo, and Kevin Tighe as General Nelson Miles. All around a very solid cast.

    The DVD unfortunately is somewhat disappointing although the price is low. The movie is available only in pan-n-scan, not widescreen, which is a shame because director Walter Hill really has a beautiful movie here, filmed in Utah and Arizona. Only special feature is a trailer. But bad DVD or not, it's an excellent movie that benefits from a great cast and showing both sides of the story. Give Geronimo: An American Legend a try!...more info
  • Review of Geronimo
    This is a well-written and historically accurate account of the treatment of the Apache indian Geronimo. It may come across a shock to some who were not aware of the illegal and immoral treatment of the American indians in general and Geronimo in particular. Notice how sad the Apache are at the end of the DVD, once they realize that they have been overpowered, coerced into submission then imprisoned for life by Americans in pursuit of their "Manifest Destiny."

    ...more info
  • ...a stunningly well told epic possessing a timeless message...
    From the moment that Matt Damon as 2nd Lt. Britton Davis commenced a narration of this sensitive and fascinating account of events relating to America's campaign against the Chiricahua-Apache and, in particular, Geronimo's role in that conflict, it became evident that this film possessed a rare and special quality. Indeed, I have never viewed a more compassionate and engaging rendering of the American western experience. For this I remain full of admiration for Walter Hill's eminently successful endeavor to portray the painful realities of US policy towards native Americans in the west with insight and fairness. The cast is marvelous - Jason Patric as 1st Lt. Charles B. Greenwood, Gene Hackman as General George Crook, Robert Duvall as Chief of Scouts, Al Sieber, and the compelling Cherokee actor Wes Studi playing Geronimo together with a strong supporting cast, all deliver memorable performances that seem perfectly suited to the fascinating lives they depict.

    Geronimo was released just three years after Kevin Costner's Dances With Wolves (1990) an epic that brought a fresh and greatly needed interpretation of the western experience by examining the particulars of America's conquest of lands inhabited by the Lakota - the westernmost of three Sioux groups occupying lands in both North and South Dakota. Dances With Wolves is an excellent film, but to my mind, Geronimo stands as a superior work. Sadly as Geronimo was made for television in 1993, the film would be deprived of Academy Award consideration. It should be remembered that John Houston's The Man Who Would Be King, also eluded acclaim during the Oscar ceremonies of 1975, then steadily secured a special niche reserved for greatness in the minds of legions of film goers. There is no higher honor that I can accord Geronimo than to compare it with The Man Who Would Be King.

    In Geronimo, we are able to observe the fusion of a brilliant script by an exceedingly talented screenplay writer, John Milius, Hill's wonderful direction, the majestic cinematography of Lloyd Ahern, a beautiful musical score by Ry Cooder, and first rate performances from a stellar cast. It should be noted that all of this was achieved without the inclusion of a love story. The title might certainly have been improved. And there are historical inaccuracies in this film to be sure, indeed quite a few of them. Nonetheless, the film captures the historical essence of the subject in a masterly fashion. Here we have a stunningly well told epic possessing a timeless message that contains an eerie relevancy to the politics of our contemporary world.

    An additional asset commending this film is the manner in which we are able to draw analogies between the stark and brutal nature of America's policies against the Apache in 1886 with the basic attitude and approach found today among numerous Washington-based policymakers. Insensitive, arrogant, often loutish proponents of "neo-con" philosophy today demonstrate a consistent inability or unwillingness to comprehend the nuances of other cultures. As in 1886, too many such people continue to exercise a determinant role in formulating Washington policies and have, through racist inclination or in the interest of corporate profit, brought about unnecessary and horrendous destruction worldwide. Lt. Charles B. Gatewood's character, expertly played by Jason Patric, possesses innate good sense and decisiveness. His daring, fluency with the Apache language, delicate feeling for the ways of the Chiricahua people and successful effort to persuade Geronimo to stand down, ended the desperate Chiricahua Apache warrior's struggle to maintain his freedom. Gatewood's talents and accomplishments are rewarded with punishment. Gatewood will be posted in Wyoming and forced to serve the rest of his military career in oblivion.

    The symbolism employed in this film is particularly effective, and we see this in a pronounced way at the very close of the film as Geronimo and his followers are carried by a train from their home in Arizona/New Mexico to Florida.In the new mechanized "iron-horse" dominated world in which Geronimo found himself after his surrender, the cruel nature of a Washington-based policy of land grab that crushed a time-honored nomadic way of life is plainly revealed. A mis-leading impression created here is that Geronimo lived out his final twenty-two years in exile in Florida which he did not. The details of this last phase of his life are quite understandably omitted as they do not fit into the romanticized image of the warrior that Hill so artfully projects.

    For the record, Geronimo would be sent to Fort Pickens, Florida while his family was transported to Fort Marion in St. Augustine. In 1887, all were reunited following their transfer to the Mount Vernon Barracks in Alabama where they would remain for the next five years. Geronimo and his family were moved again in 1894 to Fort Sill, Oklahoma. Geronimo never stopped asking to be returned to his native land. Many Apache people would die of tuberculosis and other diseases in Florida. In time, Geronimo would participate in Wild West Shows, the Omaha Exposition of 1898, the 1901 Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, and the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair where he took advantage of his legendary reputation as a warrior to sell souvenirs. To his credit, Teddy Roosevelt asked Geronimo to participate in his Inaugural Parade of 1905. Four years later in 1909, Geronimo died of pneumonia and the great Chiricahua /Apache warrior was buried in the Apache burial ground at Fort Sill.

    The story does not end here. The great grandson of Geronimo 59 year old Harlyn Geronimo of Mascalero, New Mexico has asked President Bush to investigate the theft of Geronimo's skull and femur which he believes was stolen by the President's grandfather Prescott Bush in 1918 from the burial grounds of Fort Sill, Oklahoma. There is some evidence to suggest that Prescott brought these skeletal remains to the headquarters of the Skull and Crossbone Society in New Haven Connecticut to be used for bizarre rituals including an initiation rite that is said by some to involve kissing a skull, referred to as "Geronimo" that is contained in a glass case. President Bush is a member of the ultra secret and powerful Skull and Bones Society and this explains his refusal to comment upon this issue.

    Thus ninety eight years after his death, the cycle of life and the painful legacy of betrayal and infamy surrounding Geronimo that accompanies it continues. In the meantime, additional analogies can be drawn to the perilous and too often futile efforts of oppressed people everywhere including the Chiricahua- Apache to secure, amid hostile forces aligned against them, a life characterized by justice, security, human dignity and freedom....more info
  • the true story
    A very good historial movie. It has the Indians side of the story, which is refreshing to see. A great action movie that will hold your attention....more info
  • Goy-Ak-la An American Hero
    Update: Wouldn't it be nice to find a widescreen version of this movie. Amazon listed this as wide screen, but what I recieved was PAN & SCAN. The Movie was great. It would have been MUCH better in widescreen format....better yet..give me blu ray with digital sound effects!

    Those who gave this movie low marks are neither as bright nor knowledgeable as they would have you believe. True - the movie was not historically accurate because it is a MOVIE. The public does not go to the theater to watch documentaries.

    Who really knows the whole truth? If you desire more information about Geronimo, (Goy-Ak-la was his real name), I strongly suggest that you read the books; Geronimo, In His Own Words and The Truth About Geronimo, written by Bitton Davis. Davis was an Indian scout leader and knew most of the people highlighted in the MOVIE. He was not fond of Geronimo, but wrote a very interesting account of his attempts to capture the so-called renegade. The victors in any clash of cultures, all to often, write the history. My studies of Native Americans have convinced me that the original inhabitants of this country usually provide the most reliable accounts of these clashes.

    About the movie: I agree with those who felt that the action scenes were well done and the scenery was breathtaking. The directing and acting was very good, especially Wes Studi and Robert Duvall. The movie, while it may not be historically accurate, gave the audience an insight into the issues and adventures of the main characters. This movie should be in the libraries of anyone who loves a good western or action movie, even those who appreciate a history lesson every now and then.
    ...more info
  • GERONIMO THE BARBARIAN MEETS DIRTY HARRY
    A movie never comes from nowhere. John Milius, who wrote GERONIMO - AN AMERICAN LEGEND, had already written in 1993, among others, the screenplays of Dirty Harry, Jeremiah Johnson, Apocalypse Now and Conan the Barbarian, nothing less. He's one of the most influential authors of the American film production of the last thirty years. The John Milius hero is a rebel who tries to impose his own law or his own ideas on the society he has to cope with. Who else could have dared to glue the word legend with the figure of Geronimo, the Indian terrorist in essence ?

    Now, the historical accuracy of the events described in Walter Hill's GERONIMO - AN AMERICAN LEGEND is not so important, Hill and Milius's purpose was not to present a documentary film about one of the last Indian rebellions than to make us think about the motives that actuated 50 Chiricahuas warriors to defy 5'000 U.S. cavalry soldiers. Everybody is entitled to have his own opinion about the events pictured in the Walter Hill movie but we should nonetheless take the time to think about certain issues raised by Geronimo (the movie character, of course) : Why does the White Man need so much space ? If the White Men hadn't been so many, would they have still had the right to claim the Indian territories ? These questions need to be asked and, let's hope so, there always will be a John Milius to irritate us with them.

    A DVD zone guilty conscience.


    ...more info
  • Don't forget Tom Horn... Geronimo wouldn't have.
    Geronimo was a renegade Chiricahua Apache warrior but not the tribal leader. He was in fact a war chief and medicine man with an uncanny ability to elude the US Cavalry. This movie might be made well but I'll never know because I won't watch any film so historically inaccurate. The cast includes all the major characters of this very real part of American history except the most important one other than Geronimo himself. Tom Horn. Trained by Al Sieber as a civilian scout and known as "Talking Boy" to the Chiricahua Apaches because he spoke their language better than any white man ever did, including Al Sieber whom he replaced as Chief Civilian Scout when Sieber retired. Tom Horn was the only man able to track Geronimo and twice talked the great Chiricahua Apache warrior into surrendering himself to the US Military authorities. I suggest that anyone interested in this part of American history should read Life of Tom Horn: Government Scout and Interpreter by Tom Horn. It's not great literature but it was written by the man himself. A man that Geronimo greatly respected and many white historians seem to want history to forget. Life of Tom Horn, Government Scout and Interpreter ...more info