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I Will Teach You To Be Rich
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Product Description

At last, for a generation that's materially ambitious yet financially clueless comes I Will Teach You To Be Rich, Ramit Sethi's 6-week personal finance program for 20-to-35-year-olds. A completely practical approach delivered with a nonjudgmental style that makes readers want to do what Sethi says, it is based around the four pillars of personal finance— banking, saving, budgeting, and investing—and the wealth-building ideas of personal entrepreneurship.

Sethi covers how to save time by not wasting it managing money; the guns and cars myth of credit cards; how to negotiate like an Indian—the conversation begins with "no"; why "Budgeting Doesn't Have to Suck!"; how to get things rolling—for real—with only $20; what most people don't understand about taxes; how to get a CEO to take you out to lunch; how to avoid the Super Mario Brothers trap by making your savings work harder than you do; the difference between cheap and frugal; the hidden relationship between money and food. Not to mention his first key lesson: Getting started is more important than being the smartest person in the room. Integrated with his website, where readers can use interactive charts, follow up on the latest information, and join the community, it is a hip blueprint to building wealth and financial security.

Every month, 175,000 unique visitors come to Ramit Sethi's website, Iwillteachyoutoberich.com, to discover the path to financial freedom. They praise him thoughtfully ("Your site summarizes everything I want with my life—to be rich in finances, rich in experience, rich in family blessings," Dan Esparza) and effusively ("Dude, you rock. I love this site!" Richard Wu). The press has caught on, too: "Ramit Sethi is a rising star in the world of personal finance writing . . . one singularly attuned to the sensibilities of his generation. his style is part frat boy and part silicon Valley geek, with a little bit of San Francisco hipster thrown in" (San Francisco Chronicle). His writing is smart, his voice is full of attitude, and his ideas are uncommonly sound and refreshingly hype-free.

Customer Reviews:

  • awesome book!!!
    This book is a must read for everyone, because of it's simplicity and praticability.From the youngest to the oldest. good job Ramit!!!...more info
  • Smart Approach to Money Management
    Ramit has a logical approach (and we are all normally illogical on our thinking about money) on how to maximize your money. He presents it in a "hip" and humorous style. You know how you try to tell your kids(son or daughter) how to manage their money and they don't listen? Buy this book and let a young, smart guy tell them....more info
  • A complete waste of time
    Don't get this book. It's a waste of time. Your better off staying focused on your work and selling short than listening to this clown. ...more info
  • Getting Rich by waving overdraft fees - oh yes, that's how Warren Buffet did it!
    Not sure what Ramit's definition of "Rich" is, but unless it's getting at most $5000-$10000 extra in the bank, his book title is Misleading.

    The book is packed with good, common-sense advice (which can be found in almost every other Financial self-help book out there, or on the Internet for free), however getting rich this book will make you NOT.

    Common, how many $5 overdraft fees does a person has to get waived before he/she is a millionaire (my definition of rich)? (200,000 of them by the way)

    The main problem I have with this book is the TITLE. Change it to "I will teach you to have more common sense about your finances" and this book is very readable, but as it stands - sorry, my fellow readers, it's a "no-go".

    Instead of spending an hour of your time arguing on the phone with a bank rep to get rid of that $5 fee (which makes your hourly wage - $5 per hour), those wanting to get rich, should instead spend that time doing something to improve their careers or getting their own business going.

    To best way to get rich is to create VALUE for society and this world (new product, new idea, new way of doing something). How much VALUE are you creating to this world by refinancing your mortgage, getting lower interest rate or getting those fees waived??

    Notice that's exactly what Ramit is trying to do - he has actually created something of Value (this book and his blog) to get rich and I bet he will get there, unlike the readers following his book.


    ...more info
  • Well worth the money
    I don't usually get books like this but this one came highly recommended so I tried it. First of all, it wasn't boring! That surprised me. My reading choices usually involve the most entertaining choices so I expected to be bored. The other thing I expected was to find it full of unrealistic ideas or things I knew already. Once again I was wrong! And I found a bunch of other stuff I was wrong about too. I learned a lot and even put it aside to read again. This is a very good book for everyone to read in this economic crunch....more info
  • He Will Teach You To Be Rich
    I was trying to come up with an attention-grabbing title for this book to make sure nobody skimmed past. Frankly, I couldn't decide between "great personal finance book" or "the greatest personal finance book." Then I realized, the title sells itself: Ramit Sethi will teach you to be rich.

    Ramit Sethi is a brilliant guy (he hired me once or twice) and there's no doubt in my mind that he is, indeed, rich (you have to be to live in San Francisco). Insert one more joke here about him being Indian. Seriously, I've been a long time reader of his blog, aptly titled, I Will Teach You To Be Rich and couldn't wait to get my hands on this book.

    MORE THAN JUST A BOOK

    This book serves as a six week, step-by-step guide to: reducing debt, using credit cards, eliminating fees, maximizing earnings, automating finances, allocating assets, and reducing spending.

    If these all sound like scary things, don't worry, Ramit will hold your hand the entire time. His cheeky, informal writing style sounds more like your best buddy chatting about money than some writer on a soapbox trying to impress you with big words. This book is easy to read, follow-along with and teaches you all the things about finance you wish you had known when you were in your 20s.

    CRASH COURSE IN MONEY

    I took two personal finances classes in academia: one in high school and one in college. The former taught me lessons like: how to write checks (I don't use paper checks anymore) and how to balance a checkbook (I use Mint to track that information). The latter taught things like: the importance of owning real estate (we all know how that turned out) and how to manually complete your 1040 form (I use TurboTax for that). Point being: traditional finances courses and books aren't doing you a lot of good.

    I Will Teach You To Be Rich cuts through the noise (Jim Cramer, anyone?) and gives it to you straight: start saving now, don't invest in individual stocks, real estate isn't the best investment, banks sucks, but despite all of this, feel free to spend lots of money (on the things you love). If you disagree with any of the previous statements, you'll love this book.

    BOTTOM LINE

    Though I'm biased, I do think this is a must-read for anyone, especially anyone under 30. Plus, I have the benefit of hindsight: the book already hit Amazon's #1 best seller and is still #1 in personal finance.

    If I could walk up to each of my friends and slap them with a copy of this book I know it would make a huge difference in their lives. Seriously, I want all of my friends from school to read this book now. Pick up this book and start acting today. It's not hard stuff, and even the simple things like setting up automatic monthly payments have huge benefits: you'll never ever pay a late fee again. You'll never have to remember to set aside money for investing. Simply asking for an increase in your existing credit lines means you can raise your overall credit score saving you hundreds of thousands of dollars in financing (if you buy a house or car)....more info
  • The first 10 Dollars of your investment
    I've just finished Sethi's Book and I found it very useful wheter you have any debt or not, or a big amount of money ready to invest or just 50 dollars.

    Most of young people have no idea of how to invest (just like me) but Sethi explains everything in a very simple language. From Stocks, Bonds, Lifefunds, everything is covered, the book also has many useful advises of how to manage your money. And then the managment of your money in order to live a Rich Life.

    I'm gonna start investing right this week.

    Thanks Ramit.

    I Love it.

    ...more info
  • Review of I Will Teach You To Be Rich
    I really like the book. It will be a good read for my children as they each graduate from college and move into the "real" world. It also provided me with several good ideas to help me automate my budgeting, saving and planning for retirement....more info
  • Automation makes my life easier
    I Will Teach You To Be Rich has changed my outlook on personal finance. With simple tools, Ramit teaches how to make more, spend less, and track your spending. A lot of the tools that Ramit uses are available for free on the internet, but he organizes the information in an easy-to-read book.

    I really enjoyed reading the automation chapters. I believe that if you are too lazy to tend to your personal finance day-after-day, automating everything solves a lot of your problems. Who knew you could be lazy and slowly grow wealth over time? Thanks Ramit and keep up the good work on the blog!...more info
  • Don't buy the Kindle version. Get the dead tree version
    This is not a review about the book. This is a review about the Kindle version of the book.

    If you want to read this book, don't get the Kindle version as 1) it is more expensive as I write this, and most importantly 2) The book cannot be read. The author has several tables with data in his book, but the Kindle version of this book shows the data that belongs to those tables in consecutive order, without the table layout, so you don't know what piece of data belongs to what row or column, and thus the tables are unreadable.

    I don't know if Amazon has a Q&A department for Kindle books, but this is not the first time I get a book for Kindle that contains a table, a diagram or an image, and it is absolutely unreadable. These books should not be sold. Maybe Kindle 2 solves these issues, and if that were the case then they should only be sold for Kindle 2 and Amazon should refund the buyers of Kindle 1....more info
  • Best financial management book ever!
    I'm 62, and so not a member of the audience for whom Ramit wrote this book. I originally got it for my Kindle mostly out of curiosity and to see if I could win one of the Kindles Ramit was giving away. I didn't win the Kindle, but I read his book cover to cover in two days. I found out that somehow I have lived my financial life exactly the way Ramit advises, and you know what, it works! Even though I've never been in the position to be able to send a bonus back, I am financially comfortable, yes, even rich. I just ordered two of the paper books for my sons, and will be ordering a third one for my 18-year old grandson. So, all of you parents and grandparents, don't try to teach kids money management. They won't listen to you. But they will listen to Ramit, who is their age and talks like them (even though I can't figure out how he got so wise in such a short time -- maybe he's channeling Bernard Baruch)....more info
  • Sethi Exposes My Industry
    As a CFP and CPA, I will tell you that Ramit Sethi has pegged my industry perfectly with "The Myth of Financial Expertise." If you are paying an expert to beat the market, you are actually paying them to:

    * Pick stocks or mutual funds that have performed well in the past.
    * That will likely underperform going forward.
    * Then compare your portfolio to the wrong index to make you feel good.

    The whole book is well written and filled with uncommon common sense.

    I highly recommend Ramit Sethi's book!

    How a Second Grader Beats Wall Street: Golden Rules Any Investor Can Learn...more info
  • Best personal finance book I've read in a long time
    This is hands down the best personal finance book for modern, busier, web-connected people. His logic and methods for streamlining everything from retirement, debt, bank accounts and credit cards are brilliant. I'm already spending a lot less time on personal finances each week after following his "automation" techniques. My retirement and savings accounts are now consolidated and I don't think about the automatic contributions I make anymore.

    But the best concept I got from this book was "selective spending". Spend on what you love (reasonably), but seriously cut down on everything else that isn't that important to you. Currently for me, that meant spending on a nice PC and peripherals, but going out to eat a lot less frequently and postponing any car purchase indefinitely. For others it might be opposite (they love going out to eat but could get by with a $300 PC). Makes total sense and you don't have to be cheap in everything.
    ...more info
  • Amazing book!
    I can't guarantee that this book will make you rich, but its the best investment you can make in that direction!...more info
  • Best financial advice ever!
    After one year of work after college, I barely had any savings. This book gave me lots of encouragement and actionable advice to help get me not only save and manage my money well but in ways where I can still enjoy my life. Great book, Ramit!...more info
  • this will change your life
    amazing. transcends generations, but stands the ability to single-handedly change how 20-30 year olds think about money. i'm not worried about what social security is going to look like when i retire...because i'll be prepared for it on my own!...more info
  • This book pays for itself hundreds of times over!
    I loved this book. I pre-ordered it and read it in one weekend. It's an easy read, with humorous and helpful tone. I was a bit doubtful when I first got it, because I thought I had already heard the best tips and gotten all the advice I could get on personal finance. However, I was pleasantly surprised by all the new things I picked up while reading this book. Much of what is helpful in this book, in my opinion, is the way the author addresses the psychological barriers we have or put up that block us from reaching our financial goals. I can honestly say that I now know much much more about personal finance than my friends do.

    Here is my personal experience so far with implementing some of Ramit's recommended strategies. I am 25 years old and here are my results.

    I have:

    - Saved $630 in credit card interest
    - Saved $450 in gym membership fees
    - Saved $133 on filing taxes
    - Got back $375 for a weekend travel/ retreat when I told the company I reserved it through that I was laid off from work after booking the trip and decided it would be better to save the money instead.
    - Saved $40 on a prescription medication
    - Saved $7445 in my online savings account. Switched to an online savings account with higher interest, which over the course of 1 year will save me about an extra $122.58.
    - Paid off $11,000 in credit card debt, leaving a balance of $0. ***THIS ONE MAKES ME VERY HAPPY :)
    - Paid off a $3,300 loan from my parents.
    - Have invested $1,400 in a 401(k), which I have now rolled over into an IRA account.
    - Donated $160 to charitable causes.

    I know this book has helped me tremendously and it's just the start. This book is excellent and well worth it. ...more info
  • Worth its weight in gold
    In the last two weeks I've read three finance books to keep me from having a nervous breakdown every time I turned on MSNBC: 1) The WSJ Guide to the End of Wall Street by Dave Kansas; 2) Suze Orman's 2009 Action Plan, and; 3) I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit (pronounced "Ra-meet") Sethi.

    Ramit's is by far the best of the three for my purposes (I'm 26, have a job, don't really know what I'm doing w/money, but I love compound interest and try not to be stupid).

    This book is worth its weight in gold and here's why:

    First, it's targeted to a younger demographic (guessing 18-34, aka the FOX demo), and his advice is much more detailed and specific than the other books: giving readers detailed options for setting up high interest online savings accounts; breaking down renting vs owning; showing you how to save hundreds a month without budgeting ("Budgeting is the worst word in the history of the world") but by spending consciously; figuring out how much a $250 ipod really costs when charged on a CC w/14% APR ($297), and much, much more.

    Second, Ramit is very funny and tells good stories. He doesn't talk down to the reader, or say that it's not our fault that we maxed out our credit cards on DVDs and 14 subscriptions to Vibe. Instead, he tells it like it is (for example, "If you miss a credit card payment, you might as well just get a shovel and repeatedly beat yourself in the face.") He's like Dr. Phil, if Dr. Phil weren't a doctor and instead was a skinny Indian kid.

    I especially appreciated Ramit's attitude about the Starbucks rule being BS, and that instead of obsessing over lattes, we should focus on the big wins like improving our credit scores. Another valuable distinction he makes is between stupid and conscious spending. Scrimp on unnecessary expenses so that you can spend lavishly, consciously and w/o guilt on the things that really matter to you (nice pens, vacations, expensive stuff for babies, etc.)

    Third, this book is well-organized into a 6-week action plan. Of course, it will take more than that to get out of debt, build retirement savings, raise credit scores, etc., but the 6-week schedule will put you well on your way to achieving your financial goals, big and small.

    Overall, I walked away from this book with a much clearer understanding of my spending, and a much more functional relationship with my money. My only regret is that it wasn't published sooner, so I could be compound awesome. This is a MUST for every college student, post-grad, young professional, you get the picture. Truly, one of the best, most useful books of its kind, for any generation....more info
  • Worth its weight in gold (and available on Kindle)
    In the last two weeks I've read three finance books to keep me from having a nervous breakdown every time I turned on MSNBC: 1) The WSJ Guide to the End of Wall Street by Dave Kansas; 2) Suze Orman's 2009 Action Plan, and; 3) I Will Teach You To Be Rich by Ramit (pronounced "Ra-meet") Sethi.

    Ramit's is by far the best of the three for my purposes (I'm 26, have a job, don't really know what I'm doing w/money, but I love compound interest and try not to be stupid).

    This book is worth its weight in gold and here's why:

    First, it's targeted to a younger demographic (guessing 18-34, aka the FOX demo), and his advice is much more detailed and specific than the other books: giving readers detailed options for setting up high interest online savings accounts; breaking down renting vs owning; showing you how to save hundreds a month without budgeting ("Budgeting is the worst word in the history of the world") but by spending consciously; figuring out how much a $250 ipod really costs when charged on a CC w/14% APR ($297), and much, much more.

    Second, Ramit is very funny and tells good stories. He doesn't talk down to the reader, or say that it's not our fault that we maxed out our credit cards on DVDs and 14 subscriptions to Vibe. Instead, he tells it like it is (for example, "If you miss a credit card payment, you might as well just get a shovel and repeatedly beat yourself in the face.") He's like Dr. Phil, if Dr. Phil weren't a doctor and instead was a skinny Indian kid.

    I especially appreciated Ramit's attitude about the Starbucks rule being BS, and that instead of obsessing over lattes, we should focus on the big wins like improving our credit scores. Another valuable distinction he makes is between stupid and conscious spending. Scrimp on unnecessary expenses so that you can spend lavishly, consciously and w/o guilt on the things that really matter to you (nice pens, vacations, expensive stuff for babies, etc.)

    Third, this book is well-organized into a 6-week action plan. Of course, it will take more than that to get out of debt, build retirement savings, raise credit scores, etc., but the 6-week schedule will put you well on your way to achieving your financial goals, big and small.

    Overall, I walked away from this book with a much clearer understanding of my spending, and a much more functional relationship with my money. My only regret is that it wasn't published sooner, so I could be compound awesome. This is a MUST for every college student, post-grad, young professional, you get the picture. Truly, one of the best, most useful books of its kind, for any generation.

    [I originally wrote this review for the Kindle version -- Amazon doesn't have the link set up correctly yet, so if you want to buy on Kindle, just search for it under the "Kindle Books" category]...more info
  • Taking a bite out of debt and laze fair personal finance
    Who hasn't read blogs or books that paint a picture of a stress free financial life through steps like eating out one less time a week or buying store brand food. What actions come from that, for me it was 'ya thats a reasonable idea, maybe Ill suggest it to my wife' but it didnt get me 'rich'.
    Ramit's book on the other hand sheds a light on the general ignorance and ambivalence most of us have toward financial strategies and simply explains the actions needed to figure out and take action to remedy. Straight forward, honest, funny even, writing combined with simple steps are what makes this the best 10 bux you could spend.
    Once you read it you will have no hesitation in suggesting it to the other friends and family you know could benefit from it.
    Thanks Ramit!...more info
  • Love the blog - can't wait for the book!
    Just ordered my book. Love Ramit's blog. It's so helpful and full of great, easy to follow ideas. Really excited for the book....more info
  • Personal Finance Made Easy
    This book will show you how to budget without pain. Ramit breaks down how much should be spent on housing,monthly bills,savings,investments and fun money. I don't know if it will make you rich but it's a good starting point. ...more info