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Jane Eyre (Dover Thrift Editions)
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Product Description

Charlotte Bront? characterized the eponymous heroine of her 1847 novel as being "as poor and plain as myself." Presenting a heroine with neither great beauty nor entrancing charm was an unprecendented maneuver, but Bront?'s instincts proved correct, for readers of her era and ever after have taken Jane Eyre into their hearts. The author drew upon her own experience to depict Jane's struggles at Lowood, an oppressive boarding school, and her troubled career as a governess. Unlike Jane, Bront? had the advantage of a warm family circle that shared and encouraged her literary pursuits. She found immediate success with this saga of an orphan girl forced to make her way alone in the world, from Lowood School to Thornfield, the estate of the majestically moody Mr. Rochester, and beyond. Unabridged republication of a standard edition.


Cambridge Literature is a series of literary texts edited for study by students aged 14-18 in English-speaking classrooms. It will include novels, poetry, short stories, essays, travel-writing and other non-fiction.

Customer Reviews:

  • It's Jane Eyre, sir

    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • It is Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • I am Jane Eyre, sir
    It's hard to imagine a better gothic romance than "Jane Eyre" -- gloomy vast houses, mysterious secrets, and a brooding haunted man with a dark past.

    In fact, Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has pretty much everything going for it -- beautiful settings, a passionate romance tempered by iron-clad morals, and a heroine whose poverty and lack of beauty only let her brains and courage shine brighter. And it's all wrapped in the misty, haunting atmosphere of a true gothic story -- madwoman in the attic and all.

    Jane Eyre was an orphan, abused and neglected first by relatives, then by a boarding school run by a tyrannical, hypocritical minister. But Jane refuses to let anyone shove her down -- even when her saintly best friend dies from the wretched conditions.

    But many years later, Jane moves on by applying to Thornfield Hall for a governess position, and gets the job. She soon becomes the teacher and friend to the sprightly French girl Adele, but is struck by the dark, almost haunted feeling of her new home.

    Then she runs into a rather surly horseman -- who turns out to be her employer, Mr. Rochester, a cynical, embittered man who spends little time at Thornfield. They are slowly drawn together into a powerful love, despite their different social stations -- and Rochester's apparent attentions to a shallow, snotty aristocrat who wants his wealth and status.

    But strange things are happening at Thornfield -- stabbings, fires, and mysterious laughter. Jane and Rochester finally confess their feelings to each other, but their wedding is interrupted when Rochester's dark past comes to light. Jane flees into the arms of long-lost family members, and is offered a new life -- but her love for Rochester is not so easily forgotten...

    "Jane Eyre" is one of those books that transcends the labels of genre. Charlotte Bronte spun a haunting gothic romance around her semi-autobiographical heroine and Byronic anti-hero, filling it with brilliant writing and solid plot. It has everything all the other gothic romances of the time had... but Bronte gave it depth and intensity without resorting to melodrama.

    Bronte wrote in the usual stately prose of the time, but it has a sensual, lush quality, even in the dank early chapters at Lowood. At Thornfield, the book acquires an overhanging atmosphere of foreboding, until the clouds clear near the end. And she wove some tough questions into Jane's perspective -- that of a woman's independence and strength in a man's world, of extreme religion, and of the clash between morals and passion.

    And Bronte also avoided any tinges of drippy sentimentality (Mrs. Reed dies still spewing venom) while injecting some hauntingly nightmarish moments ("She sucked the blood: she said she'd drain my heart"). She even manages to include some funny stuff, such as Rochester disguising himself as an old gypsy woman.

    The story does slow down after the abortive wedding, when Jane flees Thornfield and briefly considers marrying a repressed clergyman who wants to go die preaching in India. It's rather boring to hear the self-consciously saintly St. John prattling about himself, instead of Rochester's barbed wit. But when Jane departs again, the plot speeds up into a nice, mellow little finale.

    Bronte did a brilliant job of bringing her heroine to life -- as a defiant little girl who is condemned for being "passionate," as an independent young lady, and as a woman torn between love and principle. Jane's strong personality and wits overwhelm the basic fact that she's not unusually pretty. And Rochester is a brilliantly sexy Byronic anti-hero with a prickly, mercurial wit.

    Of Charlotte Bronte's few novels, "Jane Eyre" is undoubtedly the most brilliant -- passionate, dark and hauntingly eerie. Definitely a must-read....more info
  • Worth the time!
    This book is wonderful! The beginning is a very slow read, but it picks up and is totally absorbing once you get a third through it. Once you've read it, the beginning is never dull, as many people say. Once you know the story, you'll enjoy the begininng to the full!...more info
  • I was surprised by how interested I became in the story of Jane Eyre. I had to read it for my college English Lit class.
    Through out my many years of being a student there have been good and bad books that had to be read for class. Jane Eyre in no way is one of those bad books. I had to read Bronte's novel for my college English Lit class and at first thought it might not be that interesting seeing as it was written over 200 years ago. The story of Jane Eyre pulled me in and found myself thoroughly interested in what happened to her. I now know why Jane Eyre is such a classic novel and is still being read today. The character of Jane Eyre is very strong, however she keeps most of who she is to herself due to her class in society. She becomes a sort of female detective and finally discovers where she is meant to me in the end....more info
  • Looks Good
    Haven't had a chance to read the book yet. But, it looks like it will be a great read. The book came as promised. It appears to be a high quality printing. If you are looking for this classic, I do recommend this printing....more info
  • A CLASSIC with a capital "C"
    This CLASSIC with a capital "C" deserves every excellent review it has. I can't add anything that hasn't been said. So, I will give Bront? fans a couple of website links in Haworth where the Bront? sisters wrote. The parsonage (where the family lived, father was a parson) has been turned into a museum filled with Bront? artifacts, their little dresses (the sisters were under five feet tall), letters, and books.

    I don't know if AMAZON will allow me to include website links in this review. If the links are removed you can look them up on your own.

    Haworth is in West Yorkshire. It is approximately one hour from the Manchester airport. Website: www.haworth-village.org.uk

    The Bront? Family Parsonage Website: www.bronte.org.uk
    ...more info
  • Lovely classic
    *Spoiler alert*
    I'm not a big fan of romantic works. I don't remember reading Mills & Boons or Harlequin romance novels. Chick-literature annoys me. I distance myself from Oprah's Book Club recommendations since they are mostly chick-lit or 'truimph of the human spirit' kind of fluff. The closest i've been to romantic literature is Jane Austen and Bronte sisters. Pride and Prejudice and Wuthering Heights are romantic, but there is much more to them than just snagging a nice, rich guy and marrying him. Until yesterday Mr.Bingley was my favorite romantic character of all time. He had an exceptional character, an intelligent mind and a devil-may-care disposition- the three things i admire most in a man. But if Mr.Rochester and Mr.Bingley were to be pit against each other today, i'd choose Mr.Rochester.

    Pros:
    I never imagined that I would enjoy Jane Eyre as much or even more than Pride and Prejudice. I just couldn't put the book down. The story is trite. It was probably novel in those times, given that the book was written over 170 years ago. To this jaded modern soul it would have been just another governess romance, if not for the brilliant writing. The narrative flows like a stream gushing over. Bronte's description of everything is very detailed. But it builds up the anticipation just so. One wouldn't expect to rave about a story of a governess in love with her master but too poor to profess it to him. That's the power of good writing. A good writer can create a large tome about something really mundane and it is still likely to attract a dedicated following.

    Reading it transported me to that time and place. I felt for Jane Eyre's poverty and lovelessness and admired her strength and endurance. Mr.Rochester's torment over something very common and normal in our times was heart-wrenching. I could relate to Bessie's nonchalant affection for Jane, Adele's childish enthusiasm and Mrs.Fairfax's lack of ingenuity. I adored Diana and Mary, though they were pretty much superfluous to the book, and disliked St.John for his evangelistic attitude. His contrived ideas of marriage and service to God were infuriating. I believe that one who truly loves God, loves man unconditionally, seeing God in him. But St.John clearly seperated God, man and eternal heaven and with that he just rubbed me the wrong way, despite his remarkable character and a refined mind. He was also way too stoic for my liking.

    As cliched as it was, i was really glad that it ended with Jane's marriage with Mr.Rochester. And the way she announced it was sheer pleasure. "Reader, I married him" was music to my ears.

    Cons:
    My only grouse is the way Bronte crippled Mr.Rochester in the end. It was fairly sad and entirely unnecessary. Despite that, it was a wonderful read....more info
  • A Must-Read Classic
    It is a true classic of British literature. Charlotte Bronte paints a great story with very interesting characters. Even though some would say that is is boring to read all that detailed descriptions, long internal monologues, and difficult to understand dialogues, I have to say that these are the best part of the book. The dialogues are sparkling with humor and wit.It is very entertaining to read.The author follows the development of the characters throughout the story and offers many pedagogical and psychological theories concerning the human nature and its evolution.
    It is one of the best books I have read from this period and about this period. It beautifully describes the time the story took place. Next on my reading list are more stories by Bronte. I found one of the favorite classical authors. ...more info
  • Jane Eyre hardback edition
    The book is beautiful and all that I had hoped to receive. It is a wonderful addition to my classic book collection. Thank you. ...more info
  • A Well Written Governess Romance
    At first glance, this book seems like the story of a lower class woman winning the heart of a rich and of a higher tier man. However, there is much more to the book than just a passionate romance. In addition it has been linked to have influenced Henry James, the author of The Turn of the Screw, also about a governess falling in love, but with some messed up consequences... sorry for the tangent. Anyways, Jane Eyre really is good, as Charlotte Bronte mixes Gothic elements with romance and focuses on a dynamic character who undergoes a bildungsroman and matures at the end of the book.

    Set in London, England, a stereotypical place for love, Charlotte does well in establishing the imagery of the fire between Mr. Rochester and Jane. She constantly uses colors to set the mood and uses it to set off feelings. Mainly, she appeals to our sense of cold and hot, to paint Jane's emotions, it is wonderfully aesthetic and should be a good read to those who enjoys language.

    Not only is her plot above average, and her literary devices superior, she is able to meld the two together flawlessly for those who love to read for storyline and those who enjoy a good analysis on what they read. By now one should get the tone from me that Jane Eyre is not your average romance novel. It is more than that. It also speaks of moral responsibility. This centers around the two protagonists love, as Rochester is still married, and kept it hidden. When Jane finds out, she is caught in a dilemma between her principles and her feelings. Unable to figure out a compromise she runs away. Only when Rochester redeems himself by trying to rescue his wife from a fire is he then able to prove to Jane that he has changed and is a candidate for her love. Conveniently, his wife dies in the fire, and Rochester is left crippled, but not permanently. This represents his forgiveness; he has repented for his sins and is now able to be married. The story ends with their marriage and Jane Eyre's epilogue.

    Charlotte Bronte is a very good author, able to appeal to both kinds of readers. With her brilliant use of figurative language, making Jane's decisions seem ever more desperate, and diction, which contributes to the overall gothic mood of terror, most readers will be enchanted by her work. However, it is also this aspect that makes the book lack it's wow factor, because it appeals to both, it does has to divide it's attention between plot and device.

    I would recommend this to anyone who has not read the book yet, so what are you waiting for? Go get it!
    ...more info
  • My favorite book!
    I am 14 and I love this book!!!! I have read it 2 times and could read it again. This book is my favorite book ever, it held my attention all the way through(unlike the Jane Austin books which I like, but take a while to get instering). This is definalty the best romance I have ever read! Let me finish by saying I read it once as soon as i finished I was like man I should read it again, not much latter I was going for a long car ride so I did, and as soon as I finished it I thought the same thing, and I would have but my grandma wanted to read it(and this is such a great book that I had to let her read it beacuse everyone at least once should read it). One more thing I cried reading this book(add this to my list of books that make me cry: Marley and Me, The Return of the King, and now Jane Eyre)....more info
  • Great Content. A Bit Too Lengthy.
    Charlotte Bronte discusses one the most important issues we face today in our society--namely a girl's struggle to be loved but also to be socially and mentally independent. Jane Eyre is a lonely, miserable child, who finally becomes a happy, satisfied wife. She does so only after struggling and suffering as a child and later as a young woman. Although the content is very interesting for most, I believe that Bronte could have fitted it in 280 instead of 480 pages.

    Jane initially maintains her romantic relationships superficial since, according to her, they will result in her lack of independence. Jane's romances with Rochester and St. John are not essentially based on true love, and thus, do not flourish. Rochester is interested in Jane because of her intelligence and piano skills; however, Jane believes that the great social differences between her and Rochester make her unworthy of this relation. A marriage would mean abiding by a husband's orders and the household's chores, which definitely is not her connotation of love. Jane's undeveloped romantic relationships fortify her desire for independence and romance simultaneously.

    Only by becoming socially and economically equal to Rochester does Jane finally seek a deep, lasting romantic relationship, fulfilling Bronte's assertion that a rational balance between emotions and desires is required to become happy. Jane's acquaintance with her cousins provides her the emotional support she seeks throughout the novel. An added support is Jane's inheritance of her wealthy uncle, which makes her not only socially but also economically equal to Rochester. Now that Jane is economically, socially, and emotionally autonomous, she can accept Rochester's proposal.

    In Jane Eyre, Jane discovers the secret of having a happy life through rationally balancing her desires for independence and her emotions towards Rochester and St. John. Nowadays, many young women struggle to achieve this balance. Therefore, I greatly encourage any who face that same problem to read this book. Maybe you will find your solution in one of the pages....more info
  • Painful
    All of the drama in the novel is packed into the last 30 pages. The rest of the book is incredibly dull....more info
  • Beautifully Written
    This was my first Classic novel. While it was not fast-paced and begging to be read, it was a beautifully written novel. It was very lyrical. I thought the love between Jane and Mr. Rochester was true, withstanding the test of time. It was a truly romantic book, but not so easy to read because of the time period in which it was written. For instance, this is not a novel I would read in bed at night because I would fall asleep. Still, having said that, I am happy I read it and thought Charlotte Bronte was an exceptional novelist....more info
  • Reader, I finally read it and you should too.
    I've seen meritorious film adaptations of JANE EYRE but never got around to actually reading the book until now. What I found was a strong-willed story that moves like a high-speed freight-train even in some long-winded passages. In the tradition of the best 19th century English fiction, the book possesses a sharp social eye, tinkers with narrative technique for great effect, endows settings with a character all their own, and deploys verbal and dramatic irony with abandon. It tells a whopper of a romance between two extraordinary people from the perspective of the title character, who survives every kind of hardship life has to throw her way but who never loses herself, even when she falls for Mr. Wrong-and-Right-at-the-same-time.

    This book must have knocked the socks off early Victorian England. Our heroine goes to great lengths to establish that she and Mr. Wrong/Right do not conform to the beauty standards of their world, and yet they are most attractive characters. Jane insists on being the captain of her fate, no subserviance to men, not even the one she loves. Mr. Wrong/Right who is no angel is still sympathetic. Probably the most startling theme Bronte sounds countermands her generation's zeigeist: don't marry for money, security and respectability, go for the soulmate no matter the cost. This is pretty bold stuff for the daughter of a clergyman.

    I won't get into the plot because the danger of spoilers lies in every twist. I will say that one of its climatic points bequeathed me a nightmare, such is the writer's spell. The film adaptations by their very nature cannot convey the written voice and by necessity they must conflate some characters and events to accommodate the flow of action. Watch the Orson Welles or the recent PBS version, both of which are nifty, but don't substitute them for the book, especially if you have to write a book report or pass a test on it.

    ...more info
  • If you could rate this book negative stars, I would
    One of the worst books I have ever read in my entire life, Jane Eyre is an abomination to literature. It was extremely difficult to get through the book because not only was the plot an absolute bore, the characters also contributed to that boredom.

    After reading the book twice, trying to comprehend what was the point of the story, I still have yet to understand why Charlotte Bront? even bothered writing this book. From what I can interpret, Jane Eyre is a girl who is lonely and dejected but finds love in a man called Mr. Rochester. Everything that happened in the middle is not significant. The story is extremely boring because it is too sentimental, too dull (just like Jane Eyre), and too long for a story with that plot line. What the characters say or do have no lasting effect in the reader's memory- it just blows right by. The characters are basic and have superficial, unoriginal motives. They do not do anything exciting or significant to help add to the plot. I kept skipping pages or rereading the same stuff because each and every page seems identical content-wise. The entire book has absolutely no memorable moments, proving how insignificant the work of literature truly is. Reading the book is a world of pain.

    If you are thinking about picking up this book and reading, save yourself the time and money, and go read something else worthwhile.
    ...more info
  • Just one word - Superb!
    This is one of the best readings of this book I've heard - and I've heard (and read) the book many times. I strongly recommend this for fans - especially if you're looking for a CD to listen to during a trip, when you can hear most or all of it at once....more info
  • Delightful reading
    I usually read murder mysteries but ordered the audiobook after viewing the Brontes' sisters biography on television. It's a wonderful book. I can't believe I waited this long to read a book so popular for centuries and I don't know why this wasn't required reading in school.
    The characters are endearing, the language, beautiful and I think knowing the history of the author makes the book much more enjoyable and realistic.
    I had read Emily Brontes' Wuthering Heights years ago in my teens and enjoyed it very much but didn't appreciate the history of the author then.
    Maybe everyone should read or watch the sisters' biography then read the books....more info
  • "Destiny"
    There are many excellent books written about the human heart, but few writers master the artistry needed to combine both thought and dialog into a free flowing story that, filled with mystery and torment, capture the imagination as does Charlotte Bronte's tale of love and desire struggling upstream against the elements of life station, society's pressure, and mistakes made in youth that never lie in peace no matter how much time passes.

    Such is the novel Jane Eyre. I knew it was a Classic, and acknowledged it; I had seen several versions of the movies made of it, but did not recall having ever read the book as an adult. Written in 1847, it seemed something to watch on film, but not explore in the written word, as many such novels are difficult to read. Nothing could have been farther from the truth, and I was given an extraordinary literary experience once again by chance. It is particularly interesting given that this book was written by a woman at a time when license was thin; she managed not only to pull it off, but gave up nothing in the process while taking the reader to the smoldering destiny of what she intended to deliver.

    Jane Eyre is a hauntingly beautiful tale of a plain but highly mature and intelligent girl, shunned and unwanted by her family in her youth, much like the fairy tale of Cinderella. The reason for this travesty is finally delivered in the epilogue, yet it's integral importance yields completely to the unlikely romance that she finds as a result of it.

    She, frightened and alone but possessed of a courage and confidence that she will somehow prevail against her odds, is arranged a position as a governess for a mysterious, often absent gentleman of means who needs a tutor for his little girl. Upon arriving, she immediately senses there is a sinister intrigue surrounding the big house and it's inhabitants, but is too conscious of her place to be too inquisitive; beyond that, her sense of honor and integrity prevents any covert investigation on her part. But it is a place to flee from on occasion, and one night she leaves to send a letter out in the next town, which is a long walk through a dusky, cold winter's evening. There, on a lonely bridle path, she unwittingly meets the owner of the Estate, Edward Rochester - as he returns homeward, although in no glamorous way to be sure, as he has fallen off his horse and sprained his leg, all within her immediate vision. She come to his aid, helps him to his feet; and the first of the fateful encounters between a world-weary yet vital man and a much younger, guileless, yet very capable woman has come to be.

    The author waxes splendid in her descriptive paragraphs of the countryside and surroundings; of the morning mist shrouding the walks under the cherry trees in the old gardens surrounding the mansion; of moonlight shining in windows at night adding visuals as if by magic. But that's the periphery; the undercurrent of something else is running dark and deep. There is a secret hidden on the upper story, one that is closely guarded, yet threatens to expose itself continually, with the potential to destroy not only Mr. Rochester himself, but any chance for happiness he may decide to take.


    Rochester senses something out of the ordinary in the governess he has inherited by chance to educate and care for his child. The flighty little girl is the irritating and very tangible link to his past that brings him continual reminders of his "error" - yet has somehow been the vessel that brings about his emotional emancipation - through the hiring of Jane. And as Jane becomes acquainted with her benefactor, she realizes that despite his eccentricities, he is above other men in many, many ways, for even in her protected environment she has noticed his encouragement of equality for her; encouragement to speak her mind and reveal her thoughts to him. She is reluctant to do so, because she is wary of the differences in station between them, and realizes he has ultimate and enduring power over her. He cleverly attempts to seek out and determine ahead of time each of his moves toward his desires so that he may emerge to the next level unscathed.

    The idea flow is exquisite; articulate without a misstep anywhere in connecting her intricate plot with the characters and the moments that filter unerringly down to create the mood and the sensuality between the two unlikely lovers that are caught up in the vortex. The night the Gypsy arrives unbidden to the big house is a perfect example.The scene Jane endures with the "gypsy" in the parlor is truly one of a kind; I don't believe I have ever read anything quite it's equal for astonishing originality. The depth of emotional insight, passion, and fear of rejection and/or discovery is intensely woven into this particular part of the story in an unforgettable exchange of dialog and mental dueling; a subtle, ingenious breaking of barriers, of discovery without risk.

    Turn charlotte Bronte loose with word software on a computer with the literary license of today and one can't help but wonder just what form it would have taken. For certain though, it could not have been more masterfully written than was the "original."



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  • A triumphant classic
    Jane Eyre is the story of a young girl who grows up and is forever contrary to her society. The book foreshadows the penalties that society gives for such opposition, but Jane still remains opposed to the role society wants her to have. In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte uses foreshadowing, symbolism, and conflict to show her society how a woman can overcome the conventions of her society to live a happy and full life.
    An example of foreshadowing comes during Jane's engagement. First there is the splitting of the chestnut tree (page 226), soon after Rochester and Jane become engaged: "Before I left my bed in the morning, little Adele came running in to tell me that the great horse-chestnut at the bottom of the orchard had been struck by lightning in the night, and half of it split away." This event foreshadows how the upcoming wedding between Jane and Rochester will divide the two, sending one away, because they are not ready for marriage. It is not until Jane and Rochester both overcome the conventions of their society that they can have a happy marriage.
    The most dramatic example of foreshadowing comes right after Jane's dreams. After waking from her disturbing dreams, Jane sees a light in her room and finds a grotesque female figure standing over her (250). The figure is Bertha Mason, who came to terrify Jane out of marriage. After rending Jane's veil in two, Bertha leaves and Jane collapses. The rending of the veil foreshadows the obstacle still in front of Jane's upcoming marriage, and it is not until this obstacle is dealt with that Jane can marry.
    Aside from foreshadowing, Charlotte Bronte uses symbolism, mostly of birds, to show how Jane's society confines her. For example, Jane's surname comes from the word for a bird's nest, aerie. Rochester gives an additional example of the bird symbolism on page 232 when he says "Jane, be still, don't struggle so, like a wild frantic bird that is rending its own plumage in its desperation." Rochester says this when he is trying to convince Jane that they can be married. At this time Jane is struggling with the barriers that her society places on their union. Jane is the bird that society traps in a cage, keeping her away from the man she wants to marry. Eventually, Jane does find a way to overcome her cage and obtain happiness with Rochester.
    Bronte also uses people to symbolize certain aspects of her society. Mr. Brocklehurst, for example, is the epitome of hypocrisy, as shown during his inspection of Lowood. While surveying the girls in the school, Mr. Brocklehurst condemns one for having naturally curly hair, a vanity of the world in his opinion, and yet Brocklehurst goes so far as to buy curled wigs for his wife and daughters. In addition to this, Brocklehurst manages the funds of Lowood and never allocates enough money to keep the girls sufficiently warm or well fed. Instead of teaching the girls to live pious and frugal lives, he leaves them weakened in front of the onslaught of winter illnesses. These characteristics of Mr. Brocklehurst make him a symbol of the typical man from Jane's society. Jane's ability to overcome the wrongs he does to her shows her society how to rise above society and obtain a happy life.
    Throughout this book, Jane clashes with the conventions of her society until she rises above them. The greatest example of Jane's opposition to her society is in her successful marriage to Rochester. "Reader, I married him," Jane says on page 397. Jane does not say that they were married, or that Rochester proposed to her again. Instead, she states that she took the active role and married Rochester. Such assertion from a woman went against the standard role of women in Bronte's time. Jane opposes the role that society has established for her and rises above it, obtaining the thing that truly made her happy.
    Charlotte Bronte focuses on overcoming the conventions of her society by having Jane Eyre oppose and surmount them. Foreshadowing shows how society will react to such opposition, such as when Jane and Rochester are initially engaged. Symbolism also helps to illustrate the confines of convention; they cage Jane just like a bird. And the various clashes between Jane and other characters, even her society, further illustrated the limitations of conventionality. But opposing and overcoming the conventionality of society can lead to true and lasting happiness.

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  • touching
    I am inspired by Jane's reslove to stick to what she believes in, even when it is the most difficult thing to possibly do. this book is beautiful....more info
  • "I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will." - Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre
    Charlotte Bronte's Gothic romance novel which was written over 170 years ago, in 1847, is deservingly a classic of English literature. "Jane Eyre" has been one of my most beloved books since I was an 11-years-old girl and the friend of mine gave it to me with the words, "This book is amazing" and so it was. I have read it dozens of times and I am still not tired of it. Its language is beautiful - refined, fragrant, and surprisingly fresh. The dialogs and descriptions are memorable and visual. Above all, the novel introduces us to two main characters, a young orphan- pale, thin, "almost un-earthy" but determined, strong-willed, kind and reasonable Jane and Mr. Edward Rochester - sardonic, powerful, passionate, and tormented master of Thornfield. The story of their impossible love has attracted millions of readers not only in the English speaking countries but all over the world. "Jane Eyre" has been adapted to TV and big screen 18 times. The actors as famous and marvelous as Joan Fontaine and Orson Welles, William Hurt and Charlotte Gainsbourg, George C. Scott and Susannah York, Ciar¨¢n Hinds and Samantha Morton, Timothy Dalton and Zelah Clarke, have played the couple that had to overcome hundreds of obstacles made by society, laws, religion, by the differences in age, backgrounds, experiences, and by the fateful mistakes that would hunt one for many years.
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  • a timeless story
    In our current culture filled with technical language, slang, and gross misuse of the English language, Jane Eyre is a refreshing and brilliant view into 19th century England and pure unadultered English. It is a scintillating story told from a feminist perspective at the time, yet it is completely applicable to the 21st century. It should be required reading for all women, young and old, urban and rural, single and married. A delightful read. ...more info
  • Bravo, Jane!
    A classic for a reason. EVERY woman should read this book! Jane's strength of character and respect for herself is an example to all. Bravo, Jane!...more info
  • Beyond Lit: A Compelling Read
    Or: The Book Is Better Than The Movies. Liberate "Jane Eyre" from the stigma of the English Lit syllabus! This book is still fresh and accessible, its language easily readable, and its heroine's feelings and motives instantly recognizable. I enjoy "Jane Eyre" more every time I read it, and not because the book "gets better" --- as I grow and change and as my perspectives shift, I see things in this book that I missed before. Forget that you're "supposed" to like it. Read "Jane Eyre" for pleasure, and find your own rewards....more info