Betrayal
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Product Description

Dismas Hardy agrees to take an appeal to overturn the murder conviction of National Guard reservist Evan Scholler. Scholler had plenty of reasons for revenge°™but as Dismas delves into the case, he begins to uncover a terrible truth that drops him right into the complicated world of government conspiracy, assassination, and betrayal°≠

Customer Reviews:

  • Fast-Paced, Hard-Hitting Thriller
    Dismas Hardy has to take over the Evan Scholler case, because Scholler's lawyer has disappeared. Scholler has been accused of killing ex-Navy Seal Ron Nolan. Nolan and Evan became friends in Iraq and Evan told Nolan about his girlfriend Tara back home and once back in the States Nolan courts Tara, even while he's spinning lies and deception to break up the couple.

    Nolan is not a nice guy. In Iraq he's shot at and probably killed civilians and he's killed gangbangers in the States and that's not all, he's probably killed a rich Iraqi and his wife. Anyway once he's found dead the police zero in on Evan, who suffered a head injury in Iraq, which causes him partial memory loss. So did he kill Evan? Even he doesn't know, so Dismas Hardy really has his case cut out for him this time.

    John Lescroat writes great thrillers and he doesn't disappoint this time. His characters are well drawn and believable and as usual he ends the book with a twist in the tale that you won't see coming....more info
  • I always enjoy Dismas
    This one had a little Dismas in the end and the story in the beginning with no Dismas. Still, I always enjoy the characters and have watched their lives change and progress. I read this one on tape and the audio presenter did a good job....more info
  • Lescroart's best
    This is John Lescroart's best mystery and I've read them all. The native Texan and now permanent San Francisco fixture reprises many of his favorite continuing characters, headed by attorney Dismas Hardy and San Francisco P.D. chief of detectives Abe Glitsky, and works them into an intriguing and sometimes shocking four-year tale of murder, intrigue, and money gone berserk tied to a U.S. contractor given free rein over private security operatives in Iraq.
    Lt. Evan Scholler, a young San Franciscan whose National Guard squad is haphazardly assigned to Ron Nolan, the contractor's chief field man, almost loses his life due to the mad-dog attitude of the operative's assassin-like reactions. Evan later finds that Nolan turned Scholler's fiancee against him and moved in on her while he was near death in Walter Reed Hospital.
    A series of stateside incidents tied to the situation in Iraq triggers a confrontation between Evan and Nolan, and possibly others, winding up with Nolan dying and Scholler tried for his murder. He is found guilty and is sentenced to life.
    When three years later an attourney working on Evan's appeal is found missing and his wife suspiciously dies, Dismas and Abe re-enter the story. When the appeal file is turned over to Hardy, the Iraqi connection and the private contractor return to the tale.
    The only blemish comes for about thirty pages when Lescroart fails to engage totally believable actions and reactions that he had crafted. But the best-selling author/country-rock composer/singer returns to his solid style of the first 300 pages. Then his tale plays out to a white-knuckled, brainy climax. Excellent reading....more info
  • Betrayed
    I'm a big fan of Lescroart, but feel betrayed by this book. After "waiting three years", Dismas and Abe are merely pawns in wrapping up a fairly boring story. Two out of his last three books have not been very good, in contrast to the uniformally great prior books. I hope the author is not going the way of W.E.B. Griffin and a few others where standins are doing all the work (unsuccessfully.) While I would agree he is light years more readable than Grisham, Lescroart needs to put more effort into the next book.

    While I'm at it, the "new" easy to read paperback book format is anything but easier to read. The new size is unwieldy and not user friendly. Seems like an excuse to raise prices without any benefit to the reader....more info
  • THMeyer
    Following the advice of a previous reviewer, I checked the book out from the library. I have read all of the previous Dismas Hardy books and enjoyed them immensely. Unfortuately, this book is about three-quarters anti-Iraq War rant and one-quarter Dismas Hardy et. al., and a not so interesting Hardy tale at that. I was very disappointed....more info
  • Bait-and-switch
    For those of you expecting another great Dismas Hardy/Abe Glitsky novel, don't be fooled by the book jacket. Hardy/Glitzky appear in the first ten pages and then not for another 250-300 pages, reappearing only for the last 110. This book should not really be advertised as featuring these characters. I'm glad I got it from the library or I really would have been unhappy....more info
  • Verbose
    This story is overwritten. At least half of the 552 pages could have been condensed into a smoother read. The same plot ideas go round and round and through several versions. It was easy to read every other page, even then with spot reading and speed reading, and still appreciate the story.
    ...more info
  • A host of perils and a question of innocence enhances a gripping narrative
    John Lescroart's BETRAYAL receives David Colacci's warm voice and experienced style as it tells of a San Francisco defense attorney Dismus Hardy and detective Abe Glitsky who agree to clean up a fellow attorney's caseload - only to discover a detailed, dangerous case awaits resolution. A host of perils and a question of innocence enhances a gripping narrative. ...more info
  • Dismas
    I am a great fan of Dismas Hardy. Every time I wash my black iron skillet I feel him looking over my shoulder telling me to just use salt to clean it.
    I wait patiently for each book to come out....more info
  • Another Literary Gem
    Another winner from John Lescroart. This tale involves the broader canvas of the Iraq war and is a nice change of pace from the all-SF locales of his previous novels.

    I don't understand some of the criticism in these reviews. IMO Lescroart's literary style, including characterization, and dialog, is among the best in the legal/crime genre and is not limited to stories that feature Hardy & Glitsky on every page. After a dozen novels, perhaps he's running dry on plots strictly centered on the two of them.

    JL had a tale to tell which required a lengthy flashback to Iraq. Difficult to place Hardy or Glitsky there. I suppose he could have cast Hardy as Scholler's trial attorney but this would have eliminated Hardy's fresh take on the evidence in the appeal process.

    Also, criticism of US defense contractor operations in the early days of the Iraq occupation is factual, not "political" or "anti-Iraq War rant". Calling the situation there chaotic is an understatement. In an attempt to get the country up and running again, enormous sums of money were thrown at any and all contractors who promised to get the job done.


    ...more info
  • Dismal without Dismas
    Spoiler alert: While I don't give away the ending, I do complain about it.

    The book is advertised as a new Dismas Hardy/Abe Glitsky novel. It isn't. They appear in maybe 1/3 of the book. I think Lescroart wrote the middle of the book first, then realized he needed Hardy and Glitsky and bookended it. A lot of their part of the book is space-waster.

    The middle isn't that great either. It is an interesting story about a cop who is in the National Guard and sent to Iraq. A former commando who works for a contractor goes back to the US and by lying to both the cop and the girlfriend, takes up with the cop's ex-girlfriend. The former cop has a head injury which he slowly recovers from. He returns to figure out the lies, and goes after the commando. The commando is dead, but the cop doesn't remember anything. OK, there is a lot there to work with. Unfortunately Lescroart doesn't do the work. There are competing contractors, renegade FBI agents, an aging but very good defense lawyer, a young and also very good DA -- but it somehow doesn't come together. The ending seems tacked on and, unlike in Lescroart's better mysteries, isn't something we should have seen earlier in the way one of the characters or a group of them have acted. The part in italics at the very end really seemed misplaced -- how did the author get that information? We never know.

    It seems lazy and, at the same time, hurried as if Lescroart had to get out a book and just didn't have it in him to be rigorous with his material. There is material there -- it isn't a total failure -- and the parts in Iraq as well as the interactions between the cop, the commando and the girlfriend have promise. It just isn't fulfilled. One more thing, and this isn't a spoiler -- the commando seems to be almost super-human in his ability to defend himself against any kind of attack without deadly weapons. How he then got beaten up in his own house just doesn't make sense....more info
  • Liked it much better than I thought
    I am a great Lescroart fan - have read all his books. When I saw that most of this book was set in Iraq, I figured I would not really enjoy it. But I also thought that since it featured Glitsky and Hardy I'd better see if it was any good. Well, I was pleasantly surprised! I found it a really fast read. I won't go into the details of the story as others have done so already, suffice it to say - from my perspective - it's a solid story, fairly fast paced and creatively written. However, I hope the next novel really does focus on Hardy/Glitsky!...more info
  • Another Literary Gem
    Another winner from John Lescroart. This tale involves the broader canvas of the Iraq war and is a nice change of pace from the all-SF locales of his previous novels.

    I don't understand some of the criticism in these reviews. IMO Lescroart's literary style, including characterization, and dialog, is among the best in the legal/crime genre and is not limited to stories that feature Hardy & Glitsky on every page. After a dozen novels, perhaps he's running dry on plots strictly centered on the two of them.

    JL had a tale to tell which required a lengthy flashback to Iraq. Difficult to place Hardy or Glitsky there. I suppose he could have cast Hardy as Scholler's trial attorney but this would have eliminated Hardy's fresh take on the evidence in the appeal process.

    Also, criticism of US defense contractor operations in the early days of the Iraq occupation is factual, not "political" or "anti-Iraq War rant". Calling the situation there chaotic is an understatement. In an attempt to get the country up and running again, enormous sums of money were thrown at any and all contractors who promised to get the job done.


    ...more info
  • Dismal without Dismas
    Spoiler alert: While I don't give away the ending, I do complain about it.

    The book is advertised as a new Dismas Hardy/Abe Glitsky novel. It isn't. They appear in maybe 1/3 of the book. I think Lescroart wrote the middle of the book first, then realized he needed Hardy and Glitsky and bookended it. A lot of their part of the book is space-waster.

    The middle isn't that great either. It is an interesting story about a cop who is in the National Guard and sent to Iraq. A former commando who works for a contractor goes back to the US and by lying to both the cop and the girlfriend, takes up with the cop's ex-girlfriend. The former cop has a head injury which he slowly recovers from. He returns to figure out the lies, and goes after the commando. The commando is dead, but the cop doesn't remember anything. OK, there is a lot there to work with. Unfortunately Lescroart doesn't do the work. There are competing contractors, renegade FBI agents, an aging but very good defense lawyer, a young and also very good DA -- but it somehow doesn't come together. The ending seems tacked on and, unlike in Lescroart's better mysteries, isn't something we should have seen earlier in the way one of the characters or a group of them have acted. The part in italics at the very end really seemed misplaced -- how did the author get that information? We never know.

    It seems lazy and, at the same time, hurried as if Lescroart had to get out a book and just didn't have it in him to be rigorous with his material. There is material there -- it isn't a total failure -- and the parts in Iraq as well as the interactions between the cop, the commando and the girlfriend have promise. It just isn't fulfilled. One more thing, and this isn't a spoiler -- the commando seems to be almost super-human in his ability to defend himself against any kind of attack without deadly weapons. How he then got beaten up in his own house just doesn't make sense....more info
  • Verbose
    This story is overwritten. At least half of the 552 pages could have been condensed into a smoother read. The same plot ideas go round and round and through several versions. It was easy to read every other page, even then with spot reading and speed reading, and still appreciate the story.
    ...more info