The Web    www.100share.com    Google
 
Rich Dad's Guide to Investing: What the Rich Invest in, That the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not!
List Price: $19.95

Our Price: $5.00

You Save: $14.95 (75%)

 


Product Description

The rich are different from the rest of us, if for no other reason than U.S. tax and securities laws allow them to invest in ways that keep us from catching up to them. That's why 90 percent of all corporate shares of stock are owned by 10 percent of the people. Kiyosaki believes it's possible for anyone to move up into that 10 percent, but it takes a different view of investing than most people have: it takes a plan to be a successful investor. And a plan is more than simply buying and selling, or collecting "assets" that bring in no cash and are thus more akin to liabilities. The way most people invest, "they might as well be pushing a wheelbarrow in a circle," he writes. A plan is "mechanical, automatic, and boring," a formula for success that has worked historically for most of those who've used it. Kiyosaki's "rich dad" (actually, the father of his best friend) tells him the simplest analogy is the game Monopoly: buy four green houses, trade them for one red hotel, and repeat until you become rich.

The overall message of Rich Dad's Guide to Investing is that this is an abundant world, full of opportunity for the sophisticated investor. However, it sometimes takes a while to find this point. Much of the book is told in dialogues between young Kiyosaki and his rich dad, and these conversations can ramble. There are rewards for the careful reader--for example, in the middle of a section on the basic rules of investing, Kiyosaki's rich dad compares investor education to toilet training: difficult at first but eventually automatic. But getting to these inspired metaphors means wading through a lot of repetitive dialogue. It's a bit ironic that someone who advocates investor discipline should show so little as a writer. But by the end of the book, even the rambling starts to make sense. By the hundredth time you read that the rich don't work for money, and that you don't need money to make money, both concepts start to make sense. It still looks difficult to apply these ideas, but Rich Dad's Guide to Investing certainly makes the case that they'll work for anyone bold and smart enough to practice them. --Lou Schuler

With 16 priceless lessons that reduce risk through proper planning, this powerhouse guide removes the mystique from successful investing by helping readers switch from thinking poor to thinking rich.

Customer Reviews:

  • I recommend this book for advanced readers of Kiyosaki
    In the last three years, I read five books of Kiyosaki.
    This is my third book of this author. I recommend this book after read at least another three books of Kiyosaki:
    Poor Dad - Rich Dad, Cashflow Quadrant and Rich Dad's Who Took My Money?.
    I assign 4 star because Robert Kiyosaki lost one star spending a lot of sheets repeating the same issues and promoting his books.
    I found specially intersted and usefull the section where he explains how start our own business.

    ...more info
  • Reduntant


    I am a tremendous fan of Robert Kyosaki and his entire philosophy....but how many times is he going to write the same book? His books have a wonderful theme but there is so much overlap in all of them...if you've read one or two..you probably get the point by now. Robert, I'm a fan, but I'm starting to feel like you might be selling your fans the same song in different chords. ...more info
  • The secret of the super wealthy
    I actually enjoyed this book better than the first two in the series, Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cash Flow Quadrant. In Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Robert Kiyosaki puts it all together and explains what it really takes to become wealthy.

    For one, Kiyosaki explains the 90/10 philosophy. This is Rich Dad's version of the famous Paredo principle. In this case, Kiyosaki via rich dad explains that 90% of all investments are actually owned by only 10% of investors. Kiyosaki cites a Wall Street Journal article to support this.

    Kiyosaki goes on to state that only 1% of Americans become financially independent here in the greatest country in the world. And he explains the reasons why they fail.

    Carrying on what was revealed in the first two books, Robert Kiyosaki explains that most people have been following the wrong plan. They go to school, get a good education so they can get a good job and work 40 hours per week for 40 years and get a gold watch, that is if you haven't been downsized by that time and your company is still giving out gold watches by then.

    Kiyosaki goes on with the 4 quadrants explained in book two, Cash Flow Quadrant and explains why the first quadrant, E-Employee is a surefire plan for financial suicide. Mr. Kiyosaki explains why this group is the most heavily taxed. Robert Kiyosaki goes on to explain that people in the E quadrant can start a small, homes based business, increase their income, build their skills while enjoying tax writeoffs and still keep their 9-5 J-O-B. And then Kiyosaki goes on to explain why those in the B-Quadrant pay the very least in taxes and why anyone, including you can enjoy the same tax benefits.

    This book is primarily about investing and the fans of technical analysis, buy and hold, average down etc probably won't like this part. It's not about how to pick stocks. It is about the mentality to become rich which technical analysis can never teach you.

    Kiyosaki goes on to explain that 401 (k) plans are in reality savings plans as are most mutual funds and typical plans that so many people mispronounce investments. According to Kiyosaki, the wealthy buy and sell, they do not buy and hold. The old industrial mentality of buy and hold, dollar cost average, buy blue chips stocks and so on is outmoded. Today you buy and then sell.

    Robert Kiyosaki then goes into his 3 step piggy bank concept of putting away 10% each in a safe savings plan, a investment (mad money) plan and then finally tithing. Interesting that Kiyosaki mentions here that his poor dad (his real dad) didn't tithe because he said he couldn't afford to but his rich dad (his friends dad and Kiyosaki's mentor) started tithing when he had nothing and his income built from that point on. This part is straight out of the Richest Man in Bablyon by George Clason and is excellent advice.

    Kiyosaki also beats to death his real estate philosophy of looking at least 100 houses before you buy one. He also states that nothing down deals are the worst deals for someone with no money. Kiyosaki goes on to say that it took him 40 years to learn how to become a successful investor and most people are just too impatient.

    Finally, Kiyosaki also discusses owning a business as an investment again with the intent to create and then sell as he did. Kiyosaki discusses the difference the self employed and a business owner. Self employed sees it small, like owning one business i.e. one hamburger stand. A business person with a real business mind is more like Roy Croc and owns a franchise--big mentality=big picture.

    Kiyosaki also goes onto say that it is easier today than ever before to become rich and cites people like Michael Dell who became a billionaire in less than 6 years.

    Network marketing is again mentioned as a vehicle for creating wealth especially for those in the E category. You can start a business in your spare time with little investment, get training and move to the B-Quadrant very rapidly.

    Overall, a great book by Kiyosaki and far better than the first two which I also gave five star ratings to. I understand that a lot of people disagree with Kiyosaki and that is probably why they are in the 90% who only own 10% of investments, are happy with their J-O-B's and mispronounce their 401 (k) and other savings plans as investments.

    ...more info
  • Awesome
    Now these guys are awesome! I am in another country. I pointed, clicked, and had the item in less than 72 hours....more info
  • Did not like it
    I bought this book from bookstore. I read it completely and to my surprise title of this book is misleading. I was expecting specific strategies and more detail on different segments like real estate, commodities. However this book in just motivator which i don't need it since I am already motivated. The author has stressed one point of starting you own businesses for investment purposes. I don't think this is possible option to average person who has daily job and wants to invest his savings. Even somebody wants to become pro in investment won't start business without understanding to investement. This book is no guide for investment.

    One point I liked in this book is the idea of explaning things through the medium of "Rich dad and Poor dad"...more info
  • Make Kiyosaki Rich and Yourself a Little Poorer
    Make Kiyosaki Rich and Yourself a Little Poorer by buying this book. It amazes me how people buy the dream of becoming rich, yet make themselves poor. Kiyosaki certainly takes advantage of this by catering to greed and desire.

    Case point: you are reading this book because you are poor. People rich in money and knowledge do not buy his junk. ...more info
  • Excellent Book
    Must read if you are interested in investing in any area. Stocks, RE, Futures, whatever. Very informative in the normal Rich Dad way. I think this is third in the series and one of the most important!...more info
  • Good for self programing.
    I keep reading these books which all say pretty much the same thing, to modify my though patterns to get rich! It's working so far....more info
  • Rich Dad, Poor Dad Part 3
    This book is for changing your mind set on investing, it does not give specific advice in what stocks to by or where to buy real estate, etc.

    It is like Kiyosaki's other books in changing the readers mind set on how money works. He trys to teach in this book how it is not neccesary to have money to make money. Ideas are more powerful than money.The best investment is fulfilling a need that people have through a business. You have to be willing to pay the price to make your plan successful.I actually think this book is better than your run of the mill investment books because he goes into great detail on every kind of investment you can imagine.

    At 43 chapters it is a lot of information to take in. I do not think it is as good as his other books but is a good investment of time on your journey of financial independance....more info
  • Good, but not great
    This is the third book in the series of Rich Dad Poor Dad. While the title may be catchy, it is kind of misleading. As in his first two books, Robert Kiyosaki is teaching the public the investing mentality, rather than a guide to investing. If youre looking for a true 'guide to investing,' read Peter Lynch....more info
  • For Business Owners
    This book has excellent advice for people wanting to start a business or improve their existing business. There's also some advice on investing in other businesses. The author provides the formulas that worked for him and helped make him successful....more info
  • A vert good good book and oh so timely
    March 6, 2009

    DOW 6626 NASDAQ 1293

    Are you happy with how your investments are going?

    I have been a fan of Robert Kiyiaski for many years and really enjoy an dhave benefitted from his advice and I actually enjoyed this book better than the first two in the series, Rich Dad Poor Dad and Cash Flow Quadrant. In Rich Dad's Guide to Investing, Robert Kiyosaki puts it all together and explains what it really takes to become wealthy.

    For one, Kiyosaki explains the 90/10 philosophy. This is Rich Dad's version of the famous Paredo principle. In this case, Kiyosaki via rich dad explains that 90% of all investments are actually owned by only 10% of investors. Kiyosaki cites a Wall Street Journal article to support this.

    Kiyosaki goes on to state that only 1% of Americans become financially independent here in the greatest country in the world. And he explains the reasons why they fail.

    Carrying on what was revealed in the first two books, Robert Kiyosaki explains that most people have been following the wrong plan. They go to school, get a good education so they can get a good job and work 40 hours per week for 40 years and get a gold watch, that is if you haven't been downsized by that time and your company is still giving out gold watches by then.

    Kiyosaki goes on with the 4 quadrants explained in book two, Cash Flow Quadrant and explains why the first quadrant, E-Employee is a surefire plan for financial suicide. Mr. Kiyosaki explains why this group is the most heavily taxed. Robert Kiyosaki goes on to explain that people in the E quadrant can start a small, homes based business, increase their income, build their skills while enjoying tax writeoffs and still keep their 9-5 J-O-B. And then Kiyosaki goes on to explain why those in the B-Quadrant pay the very least in taxes and why anyone, including you can enjoy the same tax benefits.

    This book is primarily about investing and the fans of technical analysis, buy and hold, average down etc probably won't like this part. It's not about how to pick stocks. It is about the mentality to become rich which technical analysis can never teach you.

    Kiyosaki goes on to explain that 401 (k) plans are in reality savings plans as are most mutual funds and typical plans that so many people mispronounce investments. According to Kiyosaki, the wealthy buy and sell, they do not buy and hold. The old industrial mentality of buy and hold, dollar cost average, buy blue chips stocks and so on is outmoded. Today you buy and then sell.

    Robert Kiyosaki then goes into his 3 step piggy bank concept of putting away 10% each in a safe savings plan, a investment (mad money) plan and then finally tithing. Interesting that Kiyosaki mentions here that his poor dad (his real dad) didn't tithe because he said he couldn't afford to but his rich dad (his friends dad and Kiyosaki's mentor) started tithing when he had nothing and his income built from that point on. This part is straight out of the Richest Man in Bablyon by George Clason and is excellent advice.

    Kiyosaki also beats to death his real estate philosophy of looking at least 100 houses before you buy one. He also states that nothing down deals are the worst deals for someone with no money. Kiyosaki goes on to say that it took him 40 years to learn how to become a successful investor and most people are just too impatient.

    Finally, Kiyosaki also discusses owning a business as an investment again with the intent to create and then sell as he did. Kiyosaki discusses the difference the self employed and a business owner. Self employed sees it small, like owning one business i.e. one hamburger stand. A business person with a real business mind is more like Roy Croc and owns a franchise--big mentality=big picture.

    Kiyosaki also goes onto say that it is easier today than ever before to become rich and cites people like Michael Dell who became a billionaire in less than 6 years.

    Network marketing is again mentioned as a vehicle for creating wealth especially for those in the E category. You can start a business in your spare time with little investment, get training and move to the B-Quadrant very rapidly.

    Overall, a great book by Kiyosaki and far better than the first two which I also gave five star ratings to. I understand that a lot of people disagree with Kiyosaki and that is probably why they are in the 90% who only own 10% of investments, are happy with their J-O-B's and mispronounce their 401 (k) and other savings plans as investments and now look at their 401 (k) which look more like a 101 (k) and wonder, "WHAT HAPPENED??"

    Along with this book, I also recommend Rich Dad's Prophecy, Retire Young, Retire Rich and More Wealth Without Risk....more info
  • Not a fan, I can't understand why he is so popular
    I am not a fan of Robert Kiyosaki. I find his books superficial and much of what he says common sense. While he introduces some worthwhile ideas, I don't think he develops them enough to be useful.

    I also don't like the tone or context out of which this writer expresses himself. I find that it comes across as unfeeling, manipulative and selfish.

    I don't have anything against seeking out wealth; however, I think the means to that end is important. In my opinion, this author ignores that important fact and at the same time does not supply the detail that people are looking for or need to achieve their financial goals.

    In short, I think this book is a waste of money. There are many other books that can give you more useful information in less space which is delivered from a more humane emotional space.
    ...more info
  • Well, somewhat disappointing
    I really like the message of Rich Dad Poor Dad and I certainly understand that some may need further explaination, but one reviewer I noticed hit the nail on the head - repeat and repeat.

    My problem is - its ok to repeat if the messages are clear. This was somewhat confusing: be in control/invest in the market?? IPOs might be good for qualified investors, yet you have to already have money to be a qualified investor.

    I did not see a clear path from the message. If you are addressing those people who truly want to start from zero and feel they too can achieve success by following a path, then show them the path in clear, concise methodology. The story is too mixed in the messages. Some may think that real estate is good and some may think its bad, depending on what chapter you read.

    Again, this particular book is not where I expected it to be in the series of some very exceptional work overall....more info
  • A good book if you're already rich
    There is very little useful info in this book for everyday investors. Instead, I would recommend: THE LITTLE BOOK OF COMMON SENSE INVESTING by John Bogle and THE MILLIONAIRE NEXT DOOR by Thomas Stanley....more info
  • Pretty good, not great.
    It continues on some of the topics from his first book(Rich Dad Poor Dad- a five star book) but kind of leaves you feeling inspired but needing more information. The ratios given in the book are a few of the many that are taught to finance students but in using them care needs to be taken. Companies have manipulated the financial statements used in these formulas before to get the wanted outcome. Its a good book but feels drawn out, like it could have been condensed a bit. I would buy again for the price its going for....more info
  • False Prophet
    Do not rely upon this book for your financial future. Robert Kiyosaki does not preach sound principles of finance and is a highly paid spokesperson for Amway, hence his recommendation of MLM-type business as a wise pursuit. His "rich Dad" is a fictional character, and he feels he has not mislead anyone to follow a fictional financial success story anymore than Rowling has deceived anyone by creating Harry Potter. However, few people really expect to attend Hogwarts, whereas all too many people expect to find financial success by emulating fictional "Rich Dad". You would do better to check out James Cramer's books....more info
  • rating
    The condition of the book I purchased was as the seller had described it.
    Good and accurate rating system....more info
  • Gets Prize for Least Amount Said in Most Amount of Words
    It is amazing how many books and hundreds of pages Kiyosaki can fill with the same info over and over. Furthermore, "Rich Dad" was obviously a fictional character... Kiyosaki's books are all filled with long, detailed conversations between Robert and Rich Dad, conversations that supposedly took place many years ago that obviously the author could not possibly have recalled in such detail, so the books read more like a play than financial advice. To be fair though, I suppose this is a pretty good literary device for making the subject matter more interesting, readable and listenable (dramatic, even, when read aloud by the actors who record his audio books.)

    Below is EVERYTHING Kiyosaki has to say in ALL of his books (I am guilty of reading and listening to most all of them, but at least I got them for free at the library.) They are all very repetitive. The following will save you many hours of reading and dollars on his books....

    1) The rich don't work for money; money works for the rich.
    2) An asset is something that makes money for you; therefore, a house is not necessarily an asset. A liability is something that costs you money.
    3) You should borrow money to invest in real estate so that you can get rental income, because...
    4) Tax laws favor the rich and tax laws favor real estate investors, and real estate is a better investment than stocks and mutual funds, but if you are going to invest in the market then...
    5) Learn how to read financial statements.
    and
    6) The market will tank big-time when the baby-boomers start retiring.

    There you go, now you can read something else...




    ...more info
  • Guide to Investing
    Every time I pick up a Rich Dad, Poor Dad book I get so excited about all the unique and life changing information that it is sure to hold for me. Then I start trying to read it. . .

    I truly believe that Kiyosaki means well but he is such a terrible, awful, wretched, and inept writer that I am forced over and over again to labor into finding what he is actually trying to communicate. He writes in endless circles, teasing you with a juicy bit of information and then taking a hairpin turn back into meaningless restatements of his personal life and literary procrastinations. I scream, "What are you even trying to say and when will you give me something that I can use!!!"

    And there we have the real issue. This book leaves me full of tidbits that I have no idea how to incorporate into my life. How can I possibly suss out a functional process of investing from this dizzying maze of high school writing skills and meaningless anecdotes?...more info
  • ANOTHER HOMERUN BY RICH DAD!!!
    Robert Kiyosaki has done it once again!!! Being an avid reader of business/ personal development and finance books for years, I always love reading the Rich Dad books. Robert's style is straight forward, friendly, and highly coversational. Anyone interested in understanding the mindset that one needs to create before beginning their personal conquest down the roads to wealth and freedom should read every Rich Dad book they can get their hands on! ...more info
  • Fluffy, but not much body.
    Some interesting ideas, perhaps, and definitely has me thinking more about finances, so in a sense that's good maybe, but very scarce in practical information. Quoting "Rich Dad" endlessly as if he were the Messiah gets rather tiresome. Guidelines tend to be of the form "You have to make a plan", but then gives no examples of what might go into such a plan (A plan? Gee, why didn't I think of that?). Advertises his other products throughout also, and instead of an index, there's more advertising for (now wait for it) . . . his own products! No harm in that, I suppose; just seems a bit crass....more info
  • This book can enhance your knowledge of investing.
    As in Rich Dad, Poor Dad, this book has the delightful story line of advice from the father of a friend who became a very wealthy man before his death -- leaving his family well set financially for 100 years! I think it's that base in reality that makes these books so interesting.

    One of the best ways to learn is to have a successful mentor who will guide us through the key challenges of getting started. This book is designed to duplicate the experiences that the author had his rich Dad. For example, the key questions that rich Dad asked him are at the end of each section for you to answer for yourself.

    The financial advice parts of the book are tied into helping you pick up a meaningful financial plan. You begin by deciding what you want money to do for you. That's an excellent thing to do. Some want security. Some want more income. Others want substantial wealth that keeps growing. You should decide. Some books make the mistake of pushing you to choose a goal that really isn't what you want. Rather than push you in a particular direction, the book emphasizes key principles (compound cash tax-free, create assets with your mind as well as with your money). The author notes that each of us has preferences that will take us in different directions for implementing whatever our goals are. I liked that approach a lot.

    You will recognize a lot of the diagrams from Rich Dad, Poor Dad. But it is good advice, so it doesn't hurt to have the repetition. This part is fairly compact, so you can skim through it if you feel confident about the material.
    If you get to be good at this now, think how great it would be to be the rich Dad for your children and their friends. Now that's an irresistibly great goal!

    Enjoy the riches you would like to have, for the reasons you would like to have them!
    ...more info
  • Uri Gofman reviews Rich Dad's Guide to Investing
    i happen to be a big fan of Kiyosaki. while light on specific acts to do or procedures to follow, this book helps one "think" in a manner that is compatible with creating wealth and success. it is unquestionably inspirational and inspiring. the next step is up to you!...more info
  • A Must for Any Business Owner or Those Wanting to Invest
    This has been the second time I have read this book, and it makes more sense the second time than it did the first. If you're someone trying to start a business or thinking on starting a business, this is a great book to read. It will broaded your idea of what investing is, and lead you to search for other sources to broaded your financial education. Good insight on why to own a business as well as investing the time to educate yourself further so make your mind aware when the right investment brings itself to your attention....more info
  • A Fine Work on Strategic Investing
    Reading this book the second time I understood it. The funny thing about Kiyosaki's "Rich Dad's Guide to Investing" is that the material isn't implicitly clear at first--in fact I often had to put the book down and think about what he had written. The reader has to be willing to think differently, especially if you've become accustomed to thinking as an employee rather than an asset owner. The funny-money, trickle-down economics portrayed by his charts at first didn't make sense until I thought about the cash flow scenario and realized just how right he was! Using the right tax system is indeed vital to acquiring additional assets as well as benefiting from existing one. The emphasis on STRUCTURE rather than QUANTITY of work is telling--I would say that's the fundamental point of this book and a synopsis of Rich Dad's investment philosophy further expounded throughout the work. Although the organization and writing style hasn't quite congealed, Kiyosaki's book is definitely well worth the time to study and capture a successful personal business model. Well done, probably worth 4-Stars, but garners the 5-Star rating based on the beauty of the underlying business philosophy....more info
  • Rich Dads Guide To Investing
    I enjoyed the book so much I had one sent to my son who is interested in investing his money for the future. It will enlighten your outlook on life alot....more info