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Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist
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Product Description

NOW A MAJOR motion picture starring Michael Cera (Juno and Superbad) and Kat Dennings (The 40 Year-Old Virgin)! Nick and Norah¡¯s Infinite Playlist is a comedy about two teens thrust together for one hilarious, sleepless night of adventure in a world of mix tapes, late-night living, and, live, loud music. Nick frequents New York¡¯s indie rock scene nursing a broken heart and Norah is questioning all of her assumptions about the world. Though they have nothing in common except for their taste in music, their chance encounter leads to an all-night quest to find a legendary band¡¯s secret show and ends up becoming the first date that could change both their lives.

From YA fan-favorites Rachel Cohn and David Levithan comes the story of Nick and Norah. This movie tie-in edition also includes an 8-page photo insert from the film, as well as a map of Manhattan, detailing all of the sites Nick and Norah go to on their all-night date.

Customer Reviews:

  • Teen romance that occasionally reaches much higher
    Told in alternating chapters, Norah's written by Rachel Cohn and Nick's written by David Levithan, this is the story of two heartbroken teens who, by accident, capture a series of moments together over the course of one very long night.

    The alternating author format is interesting. Levithan's writing transcends the "teen romance" genre, while Cohn's remains simply good "teen romance." The struggle between the authors for control of the plot was also interesting to read-- most teens probably won't notice it, but I did.

    Nick and Norah are both good, if foul-mouthed, teens. The love they have for music, for New York, and the feelings they develop for each other are very real. I was transported to age 18, first love, and first sexual relationship when I read this book. The sweetness and vulnerability of those first experiences is well described by both authors.

    There is explicit sexuality in this book. There needs to be. The differences between one-night stands and loving relationships, the vulnerability and trust necessary for a real relationship-- these are topics the characters, at age 18, are just discovering for themselves. They are also topics that many 18-year-olds are discovering for themselves, and one would hope they reach the same conclusions that Nick and Norah do.

    Sexuality, though, is not the only topic of this book, which is about music and love-- in all its forms. Friendship, romantic love, and the Beatles' "I Wanna Hold Your Hand" as the ultimate expression of what we all want out of life-- this is a touching, lovely book that I'm pleased to know my teen patrons (who are Nick and Norah's age and entering their first romantic relationships) have read and discussed. ...more info
  • Wonderfully written and fun to read
    We anchor memories to music without even trying. Certain songs propel us out of the current moment to another time and place; sometimes for good, sometimes...not-so-good. But it's rare when we're conscious enough to pay attention and see each moment as a note, each event as a song, each connection with another person as a soundtrack. And if we're lucky, something --- or someone --- forces us to tune in and know when it's time to jam along with where the music is taking us.

    In NICK & NORAH'S INFINITE PLAYLIST, Rachel Cohn and David Levithan introduce us to Nick O'Leary and Norah Silverberg, two teens whose lives revolve around music to such an extent that it becomes the compass that guides their direction. Nick, the straight bass player in a self-described queercore band, spots his most recent ex-girlfriend with a new guy and, in an effort to make her jealous, asks the first girl he sees to pretend to be with him for five minutes. Enter Norah, the straight-laced, ambiguously neurotic daughter of a music industry executive who is only too happy to join the charade (she knows Nick's ex and relishes the thought of her reaction when the ex sees Norah kissing Nick).

    This simple "five-minute date" serves as the springboard that takes the couple around New York City on an intense Saturday all-nighter filled with exes, secret concerts, shared favorites, borscht, and an overriding (if also elusive) sense that Nick and Norah might actually be able to defy the odds and make a meaningful connection. The story hits all the right notes in capturing the first date experience --- the awkwardness of not wanting to come on too strong, the sense of urgency when perfect moments sync up and your conversation is a natural extension of your personality rather than a fusillade of "errrs" and "umms." There is discomfort in this recognition; there is also sympathy and relief in knowing that we are never weirder than anyone else.

    The book is told from Nick's and Norah's alternating points of views (Levithan writing Nick's chapters, Cohn writing Norah's) in a way that allows for each to become a fully realized character while meshing seamlessly into a strong narrative. Each writer is at the top of their game, showcasing the writing hallmarks that have earned each praise in their individual careers. Levithan imbues Nick with introspection and optimism while Cohn crafts a Norah who juggles self-doubt and unyielding confidence with a precision rarely seen outside the circus. Just as Nick and Norah fall into a conversational rhythm that suggests they've known each other for years, Cohn and Levithan's natural propinquity shines through to make for an engrossing read. If the book has any shortcomings, it comes from what might be perceived as a lengthy denouement. But by that point, you're happily along for the ride and dying to see what comes of their on/off/whatever attraction to one another.

    NICK & NORAH'S INFINITE PLAYLIST lays down a beat that drives you from cover to cover and invites you to pay attention to the soundtrack that envelops your own life: it's the best way to tell who's there to sing back-up and who's up for a duet.

    --- Reviewed by Brian Farrey (emohawk9000@gmail.com)...more info
  • Recycled
    I have read both Gingerbread and Boy Meets Boy and completely enjoyed them both tremendously. I had a hard time enjoying this book. First, the character of Norah is insecure to the point of being annoying. Second, Nick's character was not fully developed and I felt little attachment to him as a reader. Third, some of the minor characters were complete cliches--the party hard cute gay boy, the promiscuous friend etc...Also, the ending (I will not spoil it for people who wish to read the book) is completely a cheat. Not because of the end, but how cunning Nick's acts towards Norah. You don't want or believe that these two belong together....more info
  • My New Favorite Book
    This book actually surprised me. I just thought that it would be some boy meets girl, girl likes boy, they hook up. blah, blah, blah. But this book is different it shows how two insecure people who have been hurt so many times when it comes to love, and it's absolutely belivable. I read most of Rachel Cohn's books so I knew I could relate to Norah, but I've never read anything by David Levithan, but after this book I'm definately checking him out. Oh, and the ending is well deserved even though it makes you wish for a sequal, which may come!...more info
  • Fun to relive first love
    I really liked getting to know Nick and Norah and watch as their relationship slowly began unfolding. Although the entire book takes place in just one evening, I didn't feel that the story was drawn out or boring. It was a fun reliving of those first few moments of "first love" -- that warm feeling that hits you like a sudden rain shower (in fact, the rain storm scene was one of my favorites). A quick, interesting read....more info
  • Not for teenagers
    My daughter wanted to read this book. I picked it up one day to read and was astounded at the number of f**k curses in this book and the extreme sexual references. How this book and these authors (who are supposedly for teens) could be published is beyond me....more info
  • Great read...

    I read this book because I hate seeing movies that are based on books without first reading the book.

    I liked it a lot. It was an easy read, it flowed well and I was interested enough to read it in one sitting. Some bits dragged, but overall, I would give it to friends to read....more info
  • Already my favorite YA novel of 2006
    Rich in NYC atmosphere, luscious kissing, and a spot-on sense of how it feels to be _in_ the music, two smart and vulnerable teens find and reach each other over a single long night....more info
  • Good Concept, Weak Execution
    Though I'm long removed from being a teenager, I nonetheless like to read fiction about teenagers from time to time, in a probably misguided attempt to keep an aging finger on the pulse of today's kids. I picked this one up largely on the recommendation of a coworker, as well as the quasi-punk rock setting. Conceptually, the book is a winner, unfortunately it stumbles wildly in the execution, making it hard to recommend as a worthwhile read. Set in Manhattan, the story follows two teenagers for one wild and crazy night in which they meet, struggle to connect, and ultimately seem to fall in love.

    The story is narrated in alternating chapters by the titular protagonists, each of whom was ostensibly written by one of the book's coauthors. This is a neat gimmick (if not a groundbreaking one) that helps to maintain a sense of narrative momentum. Any time I was near getting bored with Norah, Nick would take over and provide a fresh perspective for a while (and vice versa). However, a flaw in the execution of this is that Nick and Norah sound awfully similar to each other. Their narrative voices are just too similar: witty, wisecracking, profanity-laden hipster teenspeak, overlaid with a heavy dose of female insecurity for Norah and male cluelessness for Nick. These latter characteristics are a another problem in execution -- Nick and Norah, for all their banter and underground scene cred, are very generic teen characters, and not particularly interesting.

    That said, their struggle to connect is well told and felt real. After a moment of chance and impetuousness throws them together, they both spend the rest of the night struggling to shake off the albatross of their recent failed relationships. I especially like how Nick's misconception of his relationship with his ex has led him down a dead-end emotional path that in the end, only the ex herself can explain. Similarly, Norah's relationship with an older guy will strike a chord with any guy who's ever been baffled with why a cool girl would be together with a complete tool. Unfortunately, these sparkling moments are often overshadowed by the book's many other problems.

    Notable among these is the ridiculous prevalence of cursing throughout the book. Now, I curse like a sailor, and always have -- but the level of cursing here just felt overdone (not unlike a Kevin Smith movie). Nick and Norah are supposed to be smart, witty kids, and in my experience teens like that have generally evolved out of that kind of unreflective language. Some level of profanity would be realistic, but the deluge here just calls too much attention to itself. Similarly, the girls call each other "b****" constantly, which felt more junior high circa 1986 than anything else. The whole punk setting felt far more cute and adorable than authentic (speaking as someone who grew up in that world). Other things don't make sense, such as Norah's insecurity that Nick is only interested in her because her father is a big time music producer. In what world do bassists in queercore bands give two cents about getting a connection to some mainstream music dude? She would know that, and thus her fear comes across as a poorly conceived plot device.

    By the latter stages of the book I was reduced to waiting for the standard teen movie finale -- the girl must overcome her insecurity, the guy his cluelessness, and they can drive off into the sunrise together. And that's pretty much what happens, so for all the pretensions to alt culture indie cred, the story winds up being pretty formulaic....more info
  • Loved it! So Funny
    Great book about one fun night for a great group of teens. Full of music, energy, and funny characters....more info
  • Good Concept, Weak Execution
    Though I'm long removed from being a teenager, I nonetheless like to read fiction about teenagers from time to time, in a probably misguided attempt to keep an aging finger on the pulse of today's kids. I picked this one up largely on the recommendation of a coworker, as well as the quasi-punk rock setting. Conceptually, the book is a winner, unfortunately it stumbles wildly in the execution, making it hard to recommend as a worthwhile read. Set in Manhattan, the story follows two teenagers for one wild and crazy night in which they meet, struggle to connect, and ultimately seem to fall in love.

    The story is narrated in alternating chapters by the titular protagonists, each of whom was ostensibly written by one of the book's coauthors. This is a neat gimmick (if not a groundbreaking one) that helps to maintain a sense of narrative momentum. Any time I was near getting bored with Norah, Nick would take over and provide a fresh perspective for a while (and vice versa). However, a flaw in the execution of this is that Nick and Norah sound awfully similar to each other. Their narrative voices are just too similar: witty, wisecracking, profanity-laden hipster teenspeak, overlaid with a heavy dose of female insecurity for Norah and male cluelessness for Nick. These latter characteristics are a another problem in execution -- Nick and Norah, for all their banter and underground scene cred, are very generic teen characters, and not particularly interesting.

    That said, their struggle to connect is well told and felt real. After a moment of chance and impetuousness throws them together, they both spend the rest of the night struggling to shake off the albatross of their recent failed relationships. I especially like how Nick's misconception of his relationship with his ex has led him down a dead-end emotional path that in the end, only the ex herself can explain. Similarly, Norah's relationship with an older guy will strike a chord with any guy who's ever been baffled with why a cool girl would be together with a complete tool. Unfortunately, these sparkling moments are often overshadowed by the book's many other problems.

    Notable among these is the ridiculous prevalence of cursing throughout the book. Now, I curse like a sailor, and always have -- but the level of cursing here just felt overdone (not unlike a Kevin Smith movie). Nick and Norah are supposed to be smart, witty kids, and in my experience teens like that have generally evolved out of that kind of unreflective language. Some level of profanity would be realistic, but the deluge here just calls too much attention to itself. Similarly, the girls call each other "b****" constantly, which felt more junior high circa 1986 than anything else. The whole punk setting felt far more cute and adorable than authentic (speaking as someone who grew up in that world). Other things don't make sense, such as Norah's insecurity that Nick is only interested in her because her father is a big time music producer. In what world do bassists in queercore bands give two cents about getting a connection to some mainstream music dude? She would know that, and thus her fear comes across as a poorly conceived plot device.

    By the latter stages of the book I was reduced to waiting for the standard teen movie finale -- the girl must overcome her insecurity, the guy his cluelessness, and they can drive off into the sunrise together. And that's pretty much what happens, so for all the pretensions to alt culture indie cred, the story winds up being pretty formulaic....more info
  • Courtesy of Teens Read Too
    Before I start the story that is Nick and Norah, I decided we needed to get some misconceptions out of the way first.

    1) I don't live in Manhattan, so I won't understand what the characters are talking about. Wrong! I don't live in Manhattan--actually, I've never been farther East than Ohio, but I still got the gist of the story quite easily. Sure, I might never have visited Times Square, but I've been on the Square in my hometown (population 3,400), and the same types of things went on there that go on in New York.

    2) This book is full of cursing. Right! And if you haven't heard a lot of curse words (do I really need to spell them out?), especially from the mouths of teens, in the last twenty years or so, I'm guessing you live on a commune somewhere in the middle of Utah.

    3) This book only covers one night. Right again! And oh, what a night it is! One night, filled with all the ups, downs, and sideways that being a teen in todays world brings.

    Now that we've got that out of the way, we can concentrate on the story. It's about Nick, a bassist for a band with an ever-changing name, who recently had his heart broken by a b***h named Tris. It's about Norah, an uber-complicated girl with more issues than The National Enquirer, who not too long ago had her virginity broken by Tal. And then there's Caroline, and Jessie, and Uncle Lou, not to mention Dev and Thom, and Randy from Are You Randy?, and Hunter from Hunter. There's beer, and there's drugs, and there's sex, although none of it is Nick or Norah's.

    There's heartbreak, and devastation, and lust, and forgiveness, and acceptance. There's parents to deal with, and friends to attempt to deal with, and a boy and a girl who wish that, just once, they could be themselves and not deal at all. There's a love story, and a song about a girl on a street in the middle of the night, and a band that just might make it big, and a car that won't start, and a subway ride that requires jumping the turnstyle.

    There's love, and anger, and disappointment, and desperation, and redemption. There's life, and then there's Nick and Norah. There's a story here, and you need to read it.
    ...more info
  • Fun Although the Language Suffers Slightly
    The Young Adult genre is a fascinating one. In one respect, while it is aimed at younger audiences, some tackle some pretty mature issues. On the other hand, there are some books that rather than tell a story, you get the feeling the authors are trying too hard to understand the youth, or trying too hard to be cool. Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist falls somewhere in that category. The story itself is good, but like so many other Young Adult Novels out there, it has a tendency to get so caught up in trying to "relate" that a lot of it comes off as being more juvenile than it should, and the characters come off as being a bit more unbelievable.

    Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist centers on the title characters. Nick is the straight bassist in a Queercore band, and he's just gotten out of a relationship with a girl named Triss and as luck would have it, she happens to be at one of the bands shows. In an attempt to show he's moving on with his love life (even though he hasn't) he finds a random girl to pretend to be his girlfriend for at least five minutes. That girl turns out to be Norah and unfortunately for Nick... she knows Triss. It also turns out that Norah has her own problems from an ex-boyfriend of her own. The two then end up spending the entire night together in New York City, getting to know one another and learning how to move on from past experiences.

    The book has a lot of good themes and things to say about love that is lost and love that is found. Unfortunately some of its prose and character interactions aren't fantastic. It's a crafty novel with a good story going behind it. For the most part Nick and Norah and the people they associate with are good characters. You'll really come to like and admire them. It's also interesting that the story is told from both of the main characters point of view. You'll get to know what Nick is thinking as well as what Norah is thinking. It helps to develop both characters even more.

    If anything Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist only suffers from simply having a little too much internal dialog. It can move the story along, but for the most part there are times when the internal thoughts of Nick and Norah can drag on for long stretches at a time. Some even go off on tangents that don't add much to the story or the character development. There are some funny moments, but for the most part it's almost as though the authors are trying harder than they need to to "be cool." It makes the story a little less enjoyable at certain moments.

    Another issue with the book to a slightly smaller degree is the language of these internal thoughts and the dialog in general. We all know that teenagers swear a lot, but in Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist there's quite a bit here. It wouldn't be quite as bad if it came off as natural and believable. But much of it doesn't. A lot of it comes off almost like young middle school students

    The language might take away from the story in some spots, but it doesn't stop the story from being enjoyable overall. You'll more than likely settle into the language overall and enjoy the story, but it's hard to sit back and tolerate it all when it doesn't make sense at certain spots. ...more info
  • Love... true love!
    I meant to read this book before the movie came out, but seeing as I severely damaged a copy of the book (oh, the shame!) and didn't see the movie, I think it's okay that I didn't finish it until now. And I'm so happy that I finally did read it! Nick & Norah are two teens in the same night club - Nick performing in a band and Norah keeping an eye on her friend. When Nick spots his recent ex, he quickly asks Norah to be his 5-minute girlfriend and she responds by kissing him. The kiss sets off a night and a relationship that moves between true love and disaster.

    I really appreciated a story that shows the way that relationships and romance can be seen so differently through two sets of eyes. The story is told in alternating chapters, Nick's written by David Levithan and Norah's by Rachel Cohn. For example, in one chapter, early in the night, Nick and Norah are sitting in another club and making small talk. Nick feels like they're really clicking, that he has answers for every one of her questions. Norah sees this exchange as him trying to guard himself with short answers to her prying questions. Their night continues this way, the two testing each other out, backing off, running, pursuing, and there's always just that urge to know each other. It's a messy relationship in more ways than one, but I feel like this was closer to real life than a lot of books.

    On a side note, I really liked the way Tris (Nick's ex) came in and out of the story and became a very different character as we got to know her. Yes, she's a b*tch, but she helps Norah in ways her best friend never has.

    I know that the language really puts some people off. Yes, it's excessive. And I think it's totally appropriate for this book, this setting, and these characters. This is a book for more mature readers -- and by that, I don't mean adults. I think this is a book that teens will appreciate for the authentic way it depicts its characters. The risque moments are tempered with reflections that (paraphrasing) a relationship like this has a lot of starts and stops, and will eventually get to its destination, so why rush it? Basically, this is a love story, maybe a microcosm of a relationship, and I think both authors do an incredible job....more info
  • amazing
    this is my new favorite book. i saw it at my cousin's house & i just had to read it. i couldn't put it down no matter how tired i was i just kept reading it till the end. i think every teen should read this book. i think that how they wrote it even boys would like it. this was just a plain amazing book. i suggest everyone read it =]...more info
  • Awesome concept!!
    I read this book in two days because I wanted to watch the movie, which my husband had rented. I had been wanting to read this book for awhile. i thought the concept of two YA writers taking turns writing each chapter was very interesting. I had never read either of their writing before and really liked both Levithan and Cohn's writing a lot.
    Basically, the whole book is one night. It's the night that Nick and Norah meet after Nick's band plays in a bar. Nick is still missing his Ex, Tris, who is just a total jerk, but it takes him a while to learn this. She is at the show too, and together Nick and Norah make her jealous of him moving on away from her, despite the fact he had still been making her mix c.d.s'(which Norah has heard every one of and loves them!)
    They end up having a whirlwind night together that involves their ex's, lots of kissing, and lots of talk of their musical tastes, which are very similar. It sort of brings them together, seeing as they are out seeing bands and are on a rampage to see a band called 'where's fluffy?'
    Like every other book turned movie, I liked the book better. It was an easy read and I liked the characters of Nick and Norah, they seemed very down to earth in a crazy world. ...more info
  • Switch Off

    "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist" is an interesting novel, with the narration alternating between Nick (whose part is written by David Levithan) and Norah (written by Rachel Cohn). The book basically tells the story of two punk scene kids who meet each other in an unconventional way, and wind up spending the entire night together in the city.

    I feel this is another review that I'll have to break up into positive and negative sections

    POSITIVE
    + It's all so believable. Nick, Norah, Dev, Tris, the dialogue, the way "scene life" is described... It is all very on point, and real.
    + The reader begins to care (towards the end, I found) about Nick, Norah, and Nick+Norah
    + It can be touching

    NEGATIVE
    + In the beginning, Levithan seems to be a much better writer than Cohn. Cohn gets better towards the end, but by this point, the chapters written by Levithan are quite a bit shorter. Cohn grows on you, but I can't help but feel that she uses big words for the sake of sounding intelligent, but really ends up sounding inexperienced.
    + It takes you a bit too long to wind up caring what happens to Nick, Norah, and Nick+Norah
    + It could have been more touching.

    Overall, I recommend it. It's good, but nothing special.

    6/10...more info