A Wrinkle in Time
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Product Description

It was a dark and stormy night; Meg Murry, her small brother Charles Wallace, and her mother had come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack when they were upset by the arrival of a most disturbing stranger.

"Wild nights are my glory," the unearthly stranger told them. "I just got caught in a downdraft and blown off course. Let me sit down for a moment, and then I'll be on my way. Speaking of ways, by the way, there is such a thing as a tesseract."

A tesseract (in case the reader doesn't know) is a wrinkle in time. To tell more would rob the reader of the enjoyment of Miss L'Engle's unusual book. A Wrinkle in Time, winner of the Newbery Medal in 1963, is the story of the adventures in space and time of Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin O'Keefe (athlete, student, and one of the most popular boys in high school). They are in search of Meg's father, a scientist who disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government on the tesseract problem.

Customer Reviews:

  • Boston Editor review
    This warm and fuzzy sci-fi classic is the chicken soup of my bookshelf. Though it is intended for young readers (teens) I've re-read it again and again as an adult and take away something new every time.
    --
    visit me online at www.editingboston.com ...more info
  • A Good Story, but not Great
    You have to wonder about a book that starts, "It was a dark and stormy night." Having said that, don't judge this book by the Disney movie. This is a very good book, just not great.

    The story blends science fiction, fantasy, humor and Christian allegory well as it tells the tale of a young girl, Meg, and her search for her father. With her younger brother Charles Wallace and their friend Calvin O'Keefe they are swept across space and time in a fight against the Dark and IT.

    Unlike most science fiction, A Wrinkle in Time treats Christian themes with respect. While Madeleine L'Engle was a practicing Episcopalian and her faith is part of this story, the book is more spiritual than Christian. I can infer what the Dark is, but we are never told. Further, we never understand what the relationship is between the Dark and IT. The characters of the story never come to any real understanding of the forces they are battling or are allied with.

    Recommendation: As young adult literature this is a superior story, but it is not great Christian literature. Read it, and then move on to the The Chronicles of Narnia Boxed Set.

    Kyle Pratt...more info
  • A Classic
    I read this book when I was a kid. Actually it was the first book I ever read. This story ranks right up there with 'Wizard of OZ' and 'It's A Wonderful Life'.

    I read it every few years and it still impresses me....more info
  • The greatest book of all time
    A Wrinkle in Time is a book about three children, Calvin, Charles Wallace, and Meg, on their journey to unknown planets in search of Meg and Charles' father, Mr. Murry, who strangely dissapeared on one of his "missions". The children, along with Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs.Who, and Mrs. Which, travel into places that are purely imagination to readers. The adventure takes them to many places, where they come in contact with several other "creatures" and IT.
    All is well until tradgedy strikes, and one of the children is, let's just say... not himself.
    As I have probably said too much already, I won't give you any more description of this book, but I can tell you that it is one of the best books I have ever read, and I truly hope that others will enjoy it just as much as me.
    ...more info
  • wonderful children's story
    I bought this book because it is referenced on "Lost". It is a wonderful, quick read. More of a children's book than for adults....more info
  • Not for Fourth Graders
    Dear Readers,
    A Wrinkle in Time is a great book for young adults and older. This book is very interesting because you feel like you're inside the book trying to destroy Camazotz or being with a eight feet tall beast. I don't recommend this book for children because there is a lot of confusing words. So if you are under the age of ten, don't read this book... yet. If you are older, go ahead, and I think you will like this book....more info
  • A Wrinkle in Time
    My granddaughter received this book from me as a gift.
    She is 14 years old; very good reader. She said the book
    was excellent; and the author is very good, and famous.
    My Granddaughter was pleased to read this author's
    work, "A Wrinkle in Time". Wonderful story, and a good
    old-fashioned good morals.
    She highly recommends it - and so do I.
    She said it was very descriptive; but easy reading; and she could not
    put the book down........more info
  • Not bad, but not special either...
    When Madeleine L'Engle croaked recently, her death received a fair bit of media attention...and her one work always mentioned was A Wrinkle in Time.

    I decided to read it at age 29, and I cannot see why this book is considered a "landmark." The plot is herky-jerky and overly contrived, and some of the dialogue is atrocious. The story-idea itself is good, but the ungainliness of the execution is too intrusive.

    Even at my advanced age, I still appreciate children's literature such as The Hobbit, Charlotte's Web, et al., so I don't think an adult perspective is what's driving my dislike. I think the book simply isn't that good....more info
  • amazing
    " A wrinkle in time " is an amazing book. When I started to read this book I was just blown away.I did`nt get the book at first, but I remembered that you can`nt judge a book by its cover. It was a book that me and my classmates were reading a while ago and they were complaining that it was a boring book to read, but I did`nt listen to them I just kept on reading the book and got the whole thing in a snap. I would recommend this book to someone who is a fantasy fanatic. ...more info
  • Wonderful book for kids and adults
    I first read this book in 6th grade and loved it. There is action, adventure, time travel, the classic fight between good and evil, imaginative beasts on far-away planets, and well developed characters. It was difficult to grasp the full meaning of it at the time though, and I made a mental note to read it again when I was older.

    I finally read it again yesterday; it only took a couple hours. I loved it even more this go-around. The emotions are described in such a way that they are raw and almost palpable. L'Engle does an excellent job of drawing the reader in and making fantasy worlds seem real. It is a beautiful story about love and hate, family, faith, and surprisingly, a lot of physics. The physics is what tripped me up as a child; I spent most of my time trying to wrap my head around the fact that people could walk through walls by rearranging atoms. It is much easier to follow as an adult (who has had many physics classes) but I would still recommend it for kids.

    The only reason I did not give this book 5 stars was that I feel that the ending is rushed and quite anticlimactic. It seemed like the last 10 pages were very forced and the author just wanted to finish the book. I won't give away the juicy details, but read it and see what you think. Despite this, however, I think that this is a book that anyone can read, and one that everyone should read at least once.
    ...more info
  • "A line is in fact not the shortest distance between two points"
    The story revolves around Meg Murray, her brother Charles Wallace, and one of the most popular kids in school, Calvin O'Keefe. Mrs' Whatsit, Who and Which take the three on a journey to save Meg and Charles Wallace's father. He's been tessering (a tesseract is a five dimensional object - in which time and space can essentially be `folded' upon itself to create a wrinkle in time) and is stuck on another planet. It's up to the kids to figure out who is holding Mr. Murray captive and how to escape.

    This was a quick, fun read. I was pleasantly surprised at the twists and turns in the novel. Mrs' Whatsit, Who, and Which were very interesting. My favorite though, has to be Charles Wallace. He's a very intriguing little kid and I'd love to learn more about him. It's interesting that he can `tune in to' other people and feel out what they're thinking or what they need. It's a nice twist that he's a little kid, not yet school age, but he essentially takes care of his mother and sister. At the beginning of the story, he's up in the middle of the night, with milk on the stove getting warm, and making sandwiches for them to calm them from the storm. I love the reversal of roles.

    I also loved the planet that Meg, her father, and Calvin tesser to. There they meet the inhabitants of the planet, who have no eyes. It was fun reading about Meg trying to explain sight and colors and not being able to see in the dark to someone with no eyes. I can't wait to pick up the next book in the quintet. ...more info
  • this is a great book!
    i love this book its got suspence love hate its got it all! this was a great book!
    ~a kid...more info
  • Wrinkle in Time book
    Great book, exactly what I wanted. Shipped a little later than I'd expected but was in as-new condition. Thanks!...more info
  • A Wrinkle rocks
    My daughter says ...
    I loved this book. It was really really good. It may be the best book I have ever read.
    ...more info
  • Love it
    I first read this book as a child, couldn't put it down. The characters were so real to me, i cried for them, for their hurts. As an adult I still cry every time I read it. It touches me that much....more info
  • My first YA L'Engle
    A classic tale of good vs. evil. The father, a physicist, of Meg Murry has been missing for several years. He had been experimenting with fifth dimension time travel when he disappeared. "It was a dark and stormy night" when things begin to happen for young Meg and her smaller brother Charles Wallace. I found the book to be quite enjoyable. Though I did note in one spot where it was a bit dated "...they were looking into an enormous room lined with machines. They were not unlike the great computing machines Meg had seen in her science books and that she knew her father sometimes worked with". I checked, the copywrite was 1962. That gave me chuckle as I can remember my dad, also a physicist, talking about the computers of the 1950s....more info
  • mediocre and simplistic tale
    The story of a girl, her younger brother and another boy, who get whisked across space and time in order to battle Evil, which has the name IT, and the shape of a big, pulsating brain. This IT, also called the Dark Thing, is striving to create a communist-type society where everyone conforms, down to the little children who bounce their balls in uniform rhythms and who live in cutter-box houses.
    The book was written in the early 60s and it shows: it reads like thinly-veiled propaganda against the Reds, who are trying to take over and make everyone look and think the same. And who fights the Thing? A girl, proud of her individuality, whose love and the Declaration of Independence assist her in defeating the big, pulsating (the pulses are red) brain called IT. It's the Declaration that sustains her initially, when she is about to be brainwashed (Korean war, anyone?), when the brain is whispering that peace comes from being like everyone else. Equal is not the same as like, she interjects (Jefferson to the rescue -take that you zombie commies!). In the end, though, she needs more than the Declaration of Independence to rescue her smart brother from being zombified - she needs God, and love.
    Oh, brother! I mean, count me in when it comes to fighting Commies. I grew up in a commie society, and I know it was evil. But this is just ridiculous. The story takes about 100 pages of tedious, banal dialogue, to get to the point where you are told that this is a battle against Evil, and all you need is love. But everything is so oversimplified, so sketchy - everything is reduced to BIG words, like IT, and evil. It's a caricature of evil, done perhaps in the belief that kids won't get it otherwise. There's not much in terms of a plot, the characters are undeveloped, the worlds described are paper-thin, and it shows no historical understanding, no outside knowledge. Do your kids a favour and don't buy it....more info
  • My Wrinke in Time
    A thrilling classic, one of the best books I have ever read, is A WRINKLE IN TIME, by Madeleine L'Engle. Usually I am not a fan of Sci-Fi novels, but this novel travels far beyond its science fiction genre. I would classify this book as a must read for all ages. It truly captures an epic moral and theme of celebrating our differences.
    This story starts in the early 1960's. The heroin is a girl named Meg Murry, who is picked on because of her different looks and appearances. At first, all she wants is to be the same as everybody else. Then, she meets three witches who say that they can help Meg find her long lost father. They take her and her brother on an adventure through space and time. The author's moral of showing us that we need to celebrate our differences or else the world would be awful is shown when the witches take Meg to a world controlled by the evil villain, IT. IT has made everything and everyone on the planet the same, destroying the meaning of life. Madeleine L'Engle truly shows how disturbing and bland life would be if life was all the same. Meg must fight against IT. Once, she yells," `Like and equal are not the same thing!' "
    Meg must learn to like her differences and use them to destroy IT. The author truly makes all of her readers recognize and celebrate their differences. This is a classical novel that you absolutely must read! ...more info
  • Sloppy edition of a classic
    First off, I should explain that my four star rating is directed at this edition, not the novel itself. A Wrinkle in Time is one of the great books of the 20th century, a thoughtful blend of science and fantasy, philosophical and ethical musings, unforgettable characters and a cracking good story. Meg Murry was the first character I ever came across, back in fifth grade, with whom I really could identify. As an adult, I still appreciate these characters and their history, which now spans eight novels plus the occasional mention in the Austin books.

    Although I generally cite A Wrinkle in Time as my favorite book, this new edition is slightly disappointing. The new material for it is fun and somewhat informative, but there isn't very much of it. Worse, the edition is marred with numerous typos. I'm glad that someone took the trouble to honor L'Engle (who died shortly after these were issued) with new editions and new artwork for her Time Quartet novels, but I wish the result were better executed. If you plan to read this great book repeatedly, I recommend the Farrar, Straus & Giroux hardcover edition
    A Wrinkle in Time instead. The various Dell editions are also good if you want a paperback. Sorry, Square Fish.
    ...more info
  • No bodiless brain needed to enjoy this book!
    A Wrinkle in Time was written by Madeleine L'Engle. It was first published in 1962.
    The story's main characters are Meg, her younger brother Charles Wallace, and her friend Calvin. One night when Meg and Calvin are out for a walk, they are met by three old ladies named Mrs. Who, Mrs. Whatsit, and Mrs. Which. The three Ladies, who are actually Celestial Creatures, take Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin on a journey to fight a dark shadow and to find Meg's and Charles' father, who disappeared while he was on a secret mission for the government.
    They found their father being held prisoner on a planet called Camazots, where they also discovered that the source of the dark shadow was a bodiless brain called IT. Their father had been blinded and was being held in a solid cell. With the help of Mrs. Who's glasses, that she had so graciously given to Meg, her father was able to see again as they helped him escape from the solid chamber. The only problem was that Charles Wallace had fallen under IT's spell, which also had captured the minds of all the residents of Camazots.
    Charles Wallace led them to the location of IT in a giant dome that pulsed with red beams. When IT tried to get Meg, Calvin, and her father to fall under his spell, Meg's father "tesseracted" (a form of traveling through space and time) them to the planet Ixchel where they were cared for. All but Charles Wallace were there and the only one who could save him was Meg. She went back to Camazots alone to try and rescue him. While she was there she discovered that you can conquer anything with love, and that's how she saved her brother. Mrs. Who, Mrs. What, and Mrs. Which transported them home to a time before they even left for the journey.
    I really enjoyed this book and can't wait to read the other four books in the Time Quintet. I think it is especially great for children because it really challenges you to use your imagination. I liked the fact that they traveled through space because space travel has always been interesting to me. This book pulls you in to the story making you feel like you are one of the characters and puts you on the edge of your seat. I recommend this book to mainly kids of 8-12 years of age.
    -Makenna Hughes
    Grade: 6
    Bothell, WA
    ...more info
  • I really liked this book
    I have read many fantasy books, and this is one of the most original books I have ever read. The fantasy ideas she uses for the book (the tesseract or wrinkle in time) is one of the most unique ideas I have found in all of the fantasy books I have read so far. Most other books I have read mention elves, dragons, dwarves, and such, much in the same fashion as JRR Tolkien did in his books such as "The Hobbit", "The Lord of the Rings" trilogy, "Farmer Giles of Ham", and some of his other works. So, to find a fantasy book with a different idea was refreshing. If you want to read something that belongs to the Fantasy section but are tired of the same type of characters, I suggest that you read this book and "Endymion Spring" by Matthew Skelton....more info
  • Fantastic
    A wonderful story which tests the imagination of the young and the young at heart. A well written children's read with several underlying universal themes that adults will enjoy immensely. Rich and three dimensional. ...more info
  • Spiritually Confusing
    This book contains strong spiritual elements which I found disturbing, as a Catholic. There is the suggestion that young Charles Wallace and Calvin the teenager both have psychic abilities akin to telepathy or clairvoyance. When the main characters want advice, they go to a "Medium" who finds her answers in a crystal ball. When Mrs. Watsit, the angelic character talks about the battle against the source of evil, the Dark Thing, she speaks of Jesus on the same level as other earthly humanitarians, artists, and scientists, e.g. Schweitzer, Rembrandt and Einstein. For Christians, Jesus is not just another humanitarian who tried to make the world better. For the Christian, Jesus is God, who has already won the battle against the Dark Thing, and His victory is available to anyone who will accept it. I don't think all books need to be instruments of Christian evangelization. However, when an author chooses to use the name of Jesus within a children's story, as Madeleine L'Engle did, (she also mentions Buddha), then parents and teachers need to make sure that the book does not contradict the religious beliefs of the student's family. ...more info
  • Timeless, Magical Story
    I first read this book in the fifth grade and I remember this being one of the first books that really made me want to read. I loved it back then and I loved it this time! It was almost like reading it for the first time again because I had forgotten so much. The only things I remembered from the story was the names of Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Which, and Mrs. Who and what "IT" was. It's such a timeless, magical story and I'd recommend it to anyone....more info
  • No bodiless brain needed to enjoy this book!
    A Wrinkle in Time was written by Madeleine L'Engle. It was first published in 1962.
    The story's main characters are Meg, her younger brother Charles Wallace, and her friend Calvin. One night when Meg and Calvin are out for a walk, they are met by three old ladies named Mrs. Who, Mrs. Whatsit, and Mrs. Which. The three Ladies, who are actually Celestial Creatures, take Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin on a journey to fight a dark shadow and to find Meg's and Charles' father, who disappeared while he was on a secret mission for the government.
    They found their father being held prisoner on a planet called Camazots, where they also discovered that the source of the dark shadow was a bodiless brain called IT. Their father had been blinded and was being held in a solid cell. With the help of Mrs. Who's glasses, that she had so graciously given to Meg, her father was able to see again as they helped him escape from the solid chamber. The only problem was that Charles Wallace had fallen under IT's spell, which also had captured the minds of all the residents of Camazots.
    Charles Wallace led them to the location of IT in a giant dome that pulsed with red beams. When IT tried to get Meg, Calvin, and her father to fall under his spell, Meg's father "tesseracted" (a form of traveling through space and time) them to the planet Ixchel where they were cared for. All but Charles Wallace were there and the only one who could save him was Meg. She went back to Camazots alone to try and rescue him. While she was there she discovered that you can conquer anything with love, and that's how she saved her brother. Mrs. Who, Mrs. What, and Mrs. Which transported them home to a time before they even left for the journey.
    I really enjoyed this book and can't wait to read the other four books in the Time Quintet. I think it is especially great for children because it really challenges you to use your imagination. I liked the fact that they traveled through space because space travel has always been interesting to me. This book pulls you in to the story making you feel like you are one of the characters and puts you on the edge of your seat. I recommend this book to mainly kids of 8-12 years of age.
    -Makenna Hughes
    Grade: 6
    Bothell, WA
    ...more info
  • What!!!!?????
    This book just about drove me crazy! I don't think I still know what is going on and what it was all about! Will not read it again ever! And will not suggest it to anyone! ...more info
  • This May Be The Answer!
    After reading all the previous reviews it appears this book is wonderful and not only for children. Someone very close to me has HATED reading since early childhood as she always felt others read SO Much better due to their seemingly vast comprehension of the books read and their dramatic ability to read every one. These abilities have escaped her for some reason even with professional assistance. Hearing the material sinks in but this audio book has received unflattering reviews. Maybe, this book, as it has done for others, will be what makes her begin to love reading. She truly NEEDS to at least be able to tolerate reading, as she has fallen behind others in every way out in the workplace. Any suggestions as to how to get her to read this book and give it a chance? Once begun, most people find it hard to put down. For her, it would be a miracle. However, she's never too old to change....more info
  • The power of love
    This was one of my all-time favorite children's books. It remains a book that speaks to me as an adult. It has a very spiritual message; that is, the answer to dealing with fear is to offer love. [...]

    Just like one of the children in the book, I always felt as if I was different from other people. I was a loner and I suffered from low self-esteem which haunted me into adulthood. Unfortunately I didn't even recognize that as an adult until I came into therapy. If only I had remembered the messages contained within this book, I might have remembered that I was perfectly okay as I was.

    Ms. L'Engle has a marvelous knack for affirming that we are all unique and we are for a purpose. That purpose is to offer love. The truths contained within this book are universal. The story is fantastic and engaging. This is a classic that no child or adult should miss. It is never too late to discover the power of love.

    Davis Aujourd'hui, author of "The Misadventures of Sister Mary Olga Fortitude"...more info
  • Madeleine L'Engle's Great Book!

    Mrs. Czarnik
    English
    15 October 2007
    A Wrinkle in Time
    This book has a truly, imaginative setting made by a great author. It is an original by a mind that stayed in the clouds. (In a good way.) It starts with a girl named Meg Murry while she's in the attic, trying to sleep, during a storm. Although she does not know that her father goes missing, testing on an experiment. The experiment was on the fifth dimension of time travel. Plus Meg's father is fighting something dark, something black. A thing of some sort.
    Is there really a fifth dimension? Did he travel through time? What is he really fighting? Read and find out!
    The setting is mostly a normal life including school, mean relatives at home, and a miserable child.
    And if you heard anything about this book, you have probably heard that it has a magical setting. Is it really a magical setting or what a person thinks about the real world? Maybe it could be a dream. Read and find out!
    All fictional readers around the world, think about these questions. Plus if you ever read this book, you will see some words that have there first letters put in twice. Make sure you pay attention because it could be something special!!


    ...more info
  • Good but dated and overrated
    My eight-year old read the book and said it's good - liked Mrs. Whatsit the most. I read the book too. Compared to the other children's books I'm reading with my children, this one is certainly a bit more on the boring side for me.

    What's good: the plot is still interesting, although the structure is a bit loose and there was too much repetitive tone for my taste. The lesson of love is a good one.

    What's not: the classic stereotype of the 60s of what the other cultures/worlds are like slightly disturbs me. To the innocent children of today's age, they may not truly appreciate what the author meant to convey. Doesn't matter, really, since I believe today's literature for children is much fuller.

    Overall, this is an OK book for kids to read for their imagination. However, I think it would be OK if they skip it. I'm not really sure if the book deserves the "classic" status it holds. Not all rejections from publishers are wrong. ...more info