Beginner seeks advice on home video security
 

It's no secret that crime is increasing every year and is
invading what once was considered "safe communities. " As the
following FBI report shows, crime is on the rise. Crimes against
property occurs on the average of 20 times a minute with
estimated $1,000 loss for each occurrence. Burglary is a crime
of opportunity where entry is gained due to the carelessness of
homeowners.
Single family homes are twice as likely to be burglarized than
apartments. While iving a lot of publicity when it happens,
hotels and motels account for less than 3% of all burglaries The
most likely things to be stolen in a burglary are cash, small
electronic equipment, home computers, cameras, jewelry, furs,
tools and hand guns.
Few people really bother about security until something happens
to them, or a neighbor. The public's complacent attitude is
burglar's best friend, and your worst enemy. There are many
things the average person can do to make their home less of a
target. This report will get your started on the right road.
Remember the two things any burglar fears the most are being
seen, and having to take too much time to complete the crime.
While burglars typically "target" a home when no one is home, if
you surprise one in the act, your chances of being injured too
high to attempt to intervene. A sobering statistic shows many
homeowners attempting to defend themselves, family members or
their property with a weapon - end up having it turned on
themselves.
Vital statistics on Crime in the United States,
reported offenses 1985-1991
Source: Uniform Crime Reports FBI
  VIOLENT    PROPERTY    MURDER &      FORCIBLE
YEAR  CRIMES      CRIMES    MANSLAUGHTER     RAPE
------------------------------ ------------------------
1985   1,328,870   11,102,600     18,980       87,670
1986   1,489,170   11,722,700     20,610       91,460
1987   1,484,000   12,024,700     20,100       91,110
1988   1,566,220   12,356,900     20,680       92,490
1989   1,646,040   12,605,400     21,500       94,500
1990   1,820,130   12,655,500     23,440      102,560
1991   1,911,770   12,961,100     24,700      106,590
                                 LARCENY
YEAR     ROBBERY     BURGLARY    & THEFT
------------------------------ ------------
1985     497,870    3,073,300    6,926,400
1986     542,780    3,241,400    7,257,200
1987     517,700    3,236,200    7,499,900
1988     542,970    3,218,100    7,705,900
1989     578,330    3,168,200    7,872,400
1990     639,270    3,073,900    7,945,700
1991     687,730    3,157,200    8,142,200
A SECURITY SURVEY
Many local law enforcement agencies will provide a free "walk
through" of your property. The purpose is to identify all
potential trouble spots and determine what steps can be
implemented to improve the overall security of your property.
You can probably organize a "block party" and have the police
"sweep" your entire block. Because of cost-cutting many local
law enforcement agencies are stretched to the limit and there
may be a long waiting list. Sometimes off-duty police omcers
will do this kind of work for a nominal fee. A few words of
caution are in order if you have some third party security
company do a survey for you. Many of course will do a free
survey to get their foot in your door and try and sell you their
security devices. So be forewarned that a locksmith will
probably try and sell you better locks, a alarm company a
security system and so on. So use common sense.
PUT YOURSELF IN A BURGLARS'S SHOES
One thing every homeowner should do at least twice a year is
take a walk around and through your property with a close friend
or neighbor who is not too familiar with your house. Start
outside and ask yourself "how would I best break in? The purpose
of not doing it alone is your pal may spot things you'll
overlook. Return the favor and complete a survey for your friend.
Besides the obvious "lived-in" look, don't get into a habit of
only doing certain things only when you're not home. Chances are
good you can tell when your neighbor isn't home. Remember it's a
burglar's job to know the same things. Most professional
criminals can tell nobody's home at least four or five houses
away.
Several dead giveaways are always closing the drapes ONLY when
you're not home. Having no garbage cans out collection day, or
an empty can sitting at the curb, are tip-offs you're not home.
So are closing up the house as tight as a drum in the hot summer
months without the air-conditioner running. Turning on a certain
light or two and every other room is in total darkness. Ditto
for picking up all the kid's toys, taking in the dog, shutting
the garage door if you frequently leave it open, and turning off
the lawn sprinkler.
Many people before leaving turn on the "burglar light, " the
light over the kitchen sink. You might as well hang a sign on
the front door you're not home! If you use an answering machine
never leave a message that you're not home. Instead say you
can't come to the phone right now. If you don't have a machine,
turn down the volume on phones before leaving so it can't be
heard from outside - another dead giveaway nobody's home.
EFFECTIVE BURGLAR DETERRENTS
You've probably head it several times and it's true! A dog is
one of the best deterrents. Not because it's vicious, it need
not even be seen, but it has to be heard. A dog with a menacing
bark will scare away a lot of would-be burglars, not only
because they don't know what kind of dog you have and what risk
it would be to them if try tried to break in, but more likely
because a noisy dog will create a disturbance and get attention
- the last thing a burglar wants!
If you don't have a dog there's nothing stopping you from
pretending. A Beware of Dog sign on your fence, a dog house in
the back yard, even a loose dog chain or bowl can drive away a
potential burglar. Don't be fooled by companies that provide
cheap electronic "dogs" who bark none stop if a intruder trips a
relay or otherwise signals his presence. Most experienced
prowlers are familiar with these devices and won't be fooled or
scared off.
Electronic devices that are effective besides the typical whole
house alarm systems for windows and doors are infrared or motion
detectors that sense movement or the heat given off by one's
body. Anyone approaching too close will trigger any number of
attached devices. The most effective are powerful lights or
burglar horns that either flood the area with light or fill the
air with a deafening sound without notice. Just like a barking
dog, the would-be burglar will usually hightail it out of there
for fear of being discovered.
To be effective, the sensitivity of such devices much not be set
too high or stray animals will set them off too frequently which
will get you on the wrong side of your neighbors. Also be sure
such devices are high enough that they can't be easily turned
off or broken.
SECURING DOORS
Illegal entry through the front door occurs more often than all
other points of entry combined! All exterior doors should be of
solid hard wood or steel reinforced. A good door does no good if
the door frame is in bad shape or of inferior construction. Pay
special attention to the door jams. Most, even in expensive
homes are made out of cheap pine. It don't take much force to
"kick in" the door even if protected with dead bolts, if the
strike plate is attached with only a couple of 1/2 or 3/4 inch
screws.
Take a few minutes and install 2-1/2 to 3 inch stainless steel
or nickel plated screws in all your exterior door jams. Be sure
screws go at least 1-3/4 inch deep into the underlying framing
lumber. While you at it, consider getting heavy duty strike
plates or a door reinforcer kit sold in many larger home
improvement centers. Be advised you may have to chisel out more
of the door jam to install but it's worth the effort for the
greater protection provided. Another way to increase the chances
of your door holding is to further protect it from being kicked
in by installing a device on the floor that the door rests
against on inside center when shut, and swings away when the
door opens.
Any kind of sliding glass door is a favorite target. Guard
against the door being lifted up and out by installing several
screws into the door's upper track. Open and shut the door
through its entire range to allow just enough of the screw's
head protruding to allow free movement without allowing the door
to be removed. Several devices can be installed into the door's
upper or lower track that acts much like a dead bold by running
a heavy pin through the door track and deep into the frarne.
Just having a length of old broom handle at a 45 degree angle in
the door track also prevents the door from easily being forced
open and works nearly as well!
You garage door is easy pickings unless you have a electronic
door opener. Today these devices are fairly cheap (around $150)
and make it practically impossible to force open the overhead
door frorn the outside without breaking through the actual door
panels due to the high tension produced from the worm drive or
chain device that makes the openers work Yes, it is possible for
burglar to punch in the right code and gain access, but with
today's remote controls providing so many possible combinations,
the odds are very slight, and the burglar won't waste the time
trying all the possibilities.
Final bit of advice on automatic door openers. Do be sure to
change the security code from the preinstalled settings which
are almost always set to zeros. Also, if you notice your door
open and you're sure you shut it, one of your neighbors probably
set his opener to the sarne code. Take the time to change your
setting, or you're giving a potential burglar a great
opporlunity to gain free access.
SECURING WINDOWS
Burglars break windows as a last resort - or by accident. The
preferred method is cutting a access hole or slipping in a thin
stiff wire and ... misc.survivalismdf8db149d913a534">read more
Am a beginner with some Heathkit level experience.
We are about to build a custom house on one floor.  We have designed 5 camera
sites into the plans.  Object is to be able to observe: A) front door
callers; B) other sides of the house and swimming pool; C) in sequence and,
on switch command, stay on designated camera until we are satisfied with what
we see, then go back to the sequential viewing. D) Monitors with camera
switching capabilities at four locations-- # 1 inside the front door in
entrance hall, # 2 in the kitchen/breakfast room, # 3 in Study, # 4 in Main
Bedroom. E) Images may be black and white (B&W), not color, if B&W will:  (1)
substantially reduce cost of system;  (2) ensure better image capability in
low ambient outdoor light  (not starlight -- not that sort of stuff, but
capable of showing good contrast images in shadow areas during daylight and
when outside lights are on at night,  as I see in use in a local health club
-- their system , which appears to use standard industrial cameras, does a
fine job, even as evening comes on and before outside lights come on.) F)
Include 2-way intercom so front and back door visitors can identify selves
and talk with us.
G) Use wide-angle lenses and thereby avoid the complexity and cost of motor
driven, side-to-side scanning mounts for the cameras( which must be capable of
coming to a stop to continue looking at one camera view -- or doe the majority
of installations use some sort of screen "freeze" circuitry, to avoid the
complexity of motor control circuitry?)
I have tried to get a bid for this system from the folks who installed the
system at the local exercise club, without success.  The club's system has
more cameras, but only 1 monitor site.
Our local library books on such systems are out of date and minimal.
When I have talked with supposedly knowledgable people at security businesses
businesses and asked for information, the replies have always been, "Oh, we'll
send xxx (joe, Bill, etc.) out to do an estimate.  But Joe, Bill, etc. never
phone back to set up an appointment to look at our plans.
And, when I've asked about cost, and whether or not I can save money by
installing coax, etc. and/or other cabling throughout the walls as they are
built for bideo, as we have planned with respedct to TV antenna, FM signall,
Phone, computer, Hi Fi, and whatever wiring, I get no useable information
delineating what is feasible, cost-effective, and not.  And I get cost
guestimates anywhere from less than $1,000 to greater than $10,000 for the
whole setup.
My only previous attempts on the internet have located an intriguing
possibility:  The same sort of mini cameras that are regularly mounted on ski
tips of racers, helmets of auto racers and aerobatic fliers, maybe even
hockey pucks, for all I know, are being sold for around a hundred pounds
apiece, in England, along with controllers for up to 4 cameras for a couple
hundred pounds. Gee, if these are the same sensitive, rugged kind of tiny
cameras as are on skis, etc., they should work fine for home security, be
cheap to discard instead of repair, and give a wide angle, contrasty, ambient
light OK, and easy to keep relatively unknoticeable.  (They have tiny holes
for their lenses,  can be mounted in lamp stems, grates, etc. etc.  )
Where/how can I get real information as to what is needed for my situation,,
and what are the tradeoffs?
Is there an up-to-date book that I should read?
Is there a trade or consumer magazine I should read?
What are the trustworthy companies that deal in these mini setups, assuming
they are reliable, cheaper, easier to install and use than the normal
industrial camera security systems that I see all over, as I suspect is the
case?
How do I get their attention and avoid getting sold a "Cadillac" when my need
is for a "Jeep"?
Any help you folkds can give will be most appated.
  Kenora
-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own    

Louis Boyd   Jan 25 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism Louis Boyd <b...@apt2.sao.arizona.edu> - 1999/01/25 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalisme784d826d6c1c54c" Individual Message Show original ken...@jps.net wrote:
> Am a beginner with some Heathkit level experience.

That's adequate for wiring a video system from components. You generally
only have to make up coaxial cables, run 12 volt power wires and maybe
alarms for contact closure circuits.
- -> We are about to build a custom house on one floor.  We have designed 5 camera
> sites into the plans.  Object is to be able to observe: A) front door
> callers; B) other sides of the house and swimming pool; C) in sequence and,
> on switch command, stay on designated camera until we are satisfied with what
> we see, then go back to the sequential viewing. D) Monitors with camera
> switching capabilities at four locations-- # 1 inside the front door in
> entrance hall, # 2 in the kitchen/breakfast room, # 3 in Study, # 4 in Main
> Bedroom. E) Images may be black and white (B&W), not color, if B&W will:  (1)
> substantially reduce cost of system;  (2) ensure better image capability in
> low ambient outdoor light  (not starlight -- not that sort of stuff, but
> capable of showing good contrast images in shadow areas during daylight and
> when outside lights are on at night,  as I see in use in a local health club
> -- their system , which appears to use standard industrial cameras, does a
> fine job, even as evening comes on and before outside lights come on.) F)
> Include 2-way intercom so front and back door visitors can identify selves
> and talk with us.
> G) Use wide-angle lenses and thereby avoid the complexity and cost of motor
> driven, side-to-side scanning mounts for the cameras( which must be capable of
> coming to a stop to continue looking at one camera view -- or doe the majority
> of installations use some sort of screen "freeze" circuitry, to avoid the
> complexity of motor control circuitry?)

Some thoughts.  After the system has been in acouple of days you'll find
watching the monitors extremely tedious.  The chances you'll be watching
when a neighbor kid fall in your pool, there is a burglar at the side
window, etc is about zero.  Along with the cameras you need something to
trigger a bell or alarm to let you know to check the monitor.  That can
be done with a motion detector which compares the scene on the camera
with a previously stored one or a passiver infrared (PIR) motion
detector.  The latter is probably cheaper but needs a little more
wiring.
As to seeing in the dark, most cameras have some infrared ability,
particularly the very cheap black and white ones.  By adding an infrared
light source you can illuminate the area in front of the camera
continuously and "see in the dark".  The range is limited unless high
power illumination is used.  There are very low light level cameras but
they are expensive but not necessarily impractical.  I won't discuss
that here.   Another question is what do you do when your are away from
the house.  Cameras won't stop criminals but they can be helpful in
getting convictions if the person committing the crime is rded on
video tape.  It might also help ver your property.
> I have tried to get a bid for this system from the folks who installed the
> system at the local exercise club, without success.  The club's system has
> more cameras, but only 1 monitor site.

The installation of a video system is no more complex than running
wiring for a cable TV system.  If you are building your house it will be
cheapest if the cabling is done while the walls are open.  You do need
to watch cable lengths, don't bridge the coax,
provide proper terminations. etc.
> Our local library books on such systems are out of date and minimal.

Try the following web site:
http://www.supercircuits.com
The prices are what you should expect to pay.  You might find individual
items a few bucks cheaper elsewhere but I consider these to be good
prices.  Get their catalog. It shows basic hookups.
> When I have talked with supposedly knowledgable people at security businesses
> businesses and asked for information, the replies have always been, "Oh, we'll
> send xxx (joe, Bill, etc.) out to do an estimate.  But Joe, Bill, etc. never
> phone back to set up an appointment to look at our plans.

Maybe your town just doesn't have anyone suitable or you haven't called
the right
people.  Installing video systems isn't as common as alarm systems.
Some companies do both.  It's not rocket science but it is labor to
drill the holes, run the cables, and attach the connectors & power
supplies.  You will have to pay for that if you don't do it yourself.
> And, when I've asked about cost, and whether or not I can save money by
> installing coax, etc. and/or other cabling throughout the walls as they are
> built for bideo, as we have planned with respedct to TV antenna, FM signall,
> Phone, computer, Hi Fi, and whatever wiring, I get no useable information
> delineating what is feasible, cost-effective, and not.  And I get cost
> guestimates anywhere from less than $1,000 to greater than $10,000 for the
> whole setup.

You may get what you pay for or you may get less.  A simple 4 to 6
camera system with a
scanner and two B&W monitors should be under $1000 if you wire it
yourself.  If you start adding UHF remotes to show what's happening in
the barn or get into image intensifiers to see in the dark with pan &
tilt heads the $10k may not be enough.
> My only previous attempts on the internet have located an intriguing
> possibility:  The same sort of mini cameras that are regularly mounted on ski
> tips of racers, helmets of auto racers and aerobatic fliers, maybe even
> hockey pucks, for all I know, are being sold for around a hundred pounds
> apiece, in England, along with controllers for up to 4 cameras for a couple
> hundred pounds. Gee, if these are the same sensitive, rugged kind of tiny
> cameras as are on skis, etc., they should work fine for home security, be
> cheap to discard instead of repair, and give a wide angle, contrasty, ambient
> light OK, and easy to keep relatively unknoticeable.  (They have tiny holes
> for their lenses,  can be mounted in lamp stems, grates, etc. etc.  )

The tiny board level cameras give impressive performance and can be
found for under
$50 each.  Give thought to how to mount them, power them, and run the
video cables.
That's the hard part.  You probably don't need the ultra invisible
pinhole cameras. They need a little more light to provide a good image.
> Where/how can I get real information as to what is needed for my situation,,
> and what are the tradeoffs?

Read the ads from companies which sell security video equipment.  Think
about what
they say each item will do.  Don't assume it will do things which aren't
stated.  Talk to the sales rep's if you have questions on specific
capabilities.
> Is there an up-to-date book that I should read?

Probably but I've never seen one.
> Is there a trade or consumer magazine I should read?

Not that I know of but I haven't searched.  I'm an end user with a video
security system which guards my remote observatory.  It works over a UHF
radio link.  It has
infrared night vision capability.  I get to see occasional deer and
other critters. I installed it after an attemepted breakin.  No human
intruders since I put it in.
> What are the trustworthy companies that deal in these mini setups, assuming
> they are reliable, cheaper, easier to install and use than the normal
> industrial camera security systems that I see all over, as I suspect is the
> case?

I've had good luck with supercircuits.
There are some home automation companies with similar equipment at
similar prices.
They are a good place to get PIR detectors.
> How do I get their attention and avoid getting sold a "Cadillac" when my need
> is for a "Jeep"?

The same way you buy a Jeep instead of a Cadillac.  Get the
manufacturers brochures,
compare features and price.  Ask question (most have 1-800 numbers).
Think a lot about what you actually want to accomplish and how you will
use it.  You apparently already know the building blocks.  
> Any help you folkds can give will be most appated.
>   Kenora

I tried
Lou Boyd
FCSA-NRA-JPFO

Gerry Schneider   Jan 25 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism Gerry Schneider <not_h...@sympatico.ca> - 1999/01/25 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalism3efc8cac1cc4ce5d" Individual Message Show original You probably should get some help from a techie news group. Small CCD
board cameras are now cheap and very good, but watch out for the CMOS
types, which are very cheap and not very good. They're popular in toys
and so on. The two most important specs for your application are
probably resolution (380 lines or more) and sensitivity (.05 to .1 lux
is very good for low light, .2 lux is OK). Inexpensive color board
cameras usually need 1 to 2 lux, and the CMOS color cams are terrible! I
bought some at 10 lux that need sunlight for a good picture. Even good
indoor lighting is too dim. So look for CCD, 1/3 inch sensor, 380 to 400
lines, and .05 to .2 lux. That should cost less than $80 US.
- -ken...@jps.net wrote:
> Am a beginner with some Heathkit level experience.
> We are about to build a custom house on one floor.  We have designed 5 camera
> sites into the plans.  Object is to be able to observe: A) front door
> callers; B) other sides of the house and swimming pool; C) in sequence and,
> on switch command, stay on designated camera until we are satisfied with what
> we see, then go back to the sequential viewing. D) Monitors with camera
> switching capabilities at four locations-- # 1 inside the front door in
> entrance hall, # 2 in the kitchen/breakfast room, # 3 in Study, # 4 in Main
> Bedroom. E) Images may be black and white (B&W), not color, if B&W will:  (1)
> substantially reduce cost of system;  (2) ensure better image capability in
> low ambient outdoor light  (not starlight -- not that sort of stuff, but
> capable of showing good contrast images in shadow areas during daylight and
> when outside lights are on at night,  as I see in use in a local health club
> -- their system , which appears to use standard industrial cameras, does a
> fine job, even as evening comes on and before outside lights come on.) F)
> Include 2-way intercom so front and back door visitors can identify selves
> and talk with us.
> G) Use wide-angle lenses and thereby avoid the complexity and cost of motor
> driven, side-to-side scanning mounts for the cameras( which must be capable of
> coming to a stop to continue looking at one camera view -- or doe the majority
> of installations use some sort of screen "freeze" circuitry, to avoid the
> complexity of motor control circuitry?)
> I have tried to get a bid for this system from the folks who installed the
> system at the local exercise club, without success.  The club's system has
> more cameras, but only 1 monitor site.
> Our local library books on such systems are out of date and minimal.
> When I have talked with supposedly knowledgable people at security businesses
> businesses and asked for information, the replies have always been, "Oh, we'll
> send xxx (joe, Bill, etc.) out to do an estimate.  But Joe, Bill, etc. never
> phone back to set up an appointment to look at our plans.
> And, when I've asked about cost, and whether or not I can save money by
> installing coax, etc. and/or other cabling throughout the walls as they are
> built for bideo, as we have planned with respedct to TV antenna, FM signall,
> Phone, computer, Hi Fi, and whatever wiring, I get no useable information
> delineating what is feasible, cost-effective, and not.  And I get cost
> guestimates anywhere from less than $1,000 to greater than $10,000 for the
> whole setup.
> My only previous attempts on the internet have located an intriguing
> possibility:  The same sort of mini cameras that are regularly mounted on ski
> tips of racers, helmets of auto racers and aerobatic fliers, maybe even
> hockey pucks, for all I know, are being sold for around a hundred pounds
> apiece, in England, along with controllers for up to 4 cameras for a couple
> hundred pounds. Gee, if these are the same sensitive, rugged kind of tiny
> cameras as are on skis, etc., they should work fine for home security, be
> cheap to discard instead of repair, and give a wide angle, contrasty, ambient
> light OK, and easy to keep relatively unknoticeable.  (They have tiny holes
> for their lenses,  can be mounted in lamp stems, grates, etc. etc.  )
> Where/how can I get real information as to what is needed for my situation,,
> and what are the tradeoffs?
> Is there an up-to-date book that I should read?
> Is there a trade or consumer magazine I should read?
> What are the trustworthy companies that deal in these mini setups, assuming
> they are reliable, cheaper, easier to install and use than the normal
> industrial camera security systems that I see all over, as I suspect is the
> case?
> How do I get their attention and avoid getting sold a "Cadillac" when my need
> is for a "Jeep"?
> Any help you folkds can give will be most appated.
>   Kenora
> -----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
> http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own

--
Gerry
          @         Change "not_here" to "lsb"
      ##_/_\__[(
       <0_0_0>      The Hi-Tech Homestead http://www3.sympatico.ca/lsb

kelleyo   Jan 25 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism kell...@postoffice.swbell.net - 1999/01/25 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalisme9571572cd46b9f3" Individual Message Show original All the money your fixing to spend,spend it on two well trained dogs.
kelleyo
- -Louis Boyd wrote:
> ken...@jps.net wrote:
> > Am a beginner with some Heathkit level experience.
> That's adequate for wiring a video system from components. You generally
> only have to make up coaxial cables, run 12 volt power wires and maybe
> alarms for contact closure circuits.
> > We are about to build a custom house on one floor.  We have designed 5 camera
> > sites into the plans.  Object is to be able to observe: A) front door
> > callers; B) other sides of the house and swimming pool; C) in sequence and,
> > on switch command, stay on designated camera until we are satisfied with what
> > we see, then go back to the sequential viewing. D) Monitors with camera
> > switching capabilities at four locations-- # 1 inside the front door in
> > entrance hall, # 2 in the kitchen/breakfast room, # 3 in Study, # 4 in Main
> > Bedroom. E) Images may be black and white (B&W), not color, if B&W will:  (1)
> > substantially reduce cost of system;  (2) ensure better image capability in
> > low ambient outdoor light  (not starlight -- not that sort of stuff, but
> > capable of showing good contrast images in shadow areas during daylight and
> > when outside lights are on at night,  as I see in use in a local health club
> > -- their system , which appears to use standard industrial cameras, does a
> > fine job, even as evening comes on and before outside lights come on.) F)
> > Include 2-way intercom so front and back door visitors can identify selves
> > and talk with us.
> > G) Use wide-angle lenses and thereby avoid the complexity and cost of motor
> > driven, side-to-side scanning mounts for the cameras( which must be capable of
> > coming to a stop to continue looking at one camera view -- or doe the majority
> > of installations use some sort of screen "freeze" circuitry, to avoid the
> > complexity of motor control circuitry?)
> Some thoughts.  After the system has been in acouple of days you'll find
> watching the monitors extremely tedious.  The chances you'll be watching
> when a neighbor kid fall in your pool, there is a burglar at the side
> window, etc is about zero.  Along with the cameras you need something to
> trigger a bell or alarm to let you know to check the monitor.  That can
> be done with a motion detector which compares the scene on the camera
> with a previously stored one or a passiver infrared (PIR) motion
> detector.  The latter is probably cheaper but needs a little more
> wiring.
> As to seeing in the dark, most cameras have some infrared ability,
> particularly the very cheap black and white ones.  By adding an infrared
> light source you can illuminate the area in front of the camera
> continuously and "see in the dark".  The range is limited unless high
> power illumination is used.  There are very low light level cameras but
> they are expensive but not necessarily impractical.  I won't discuss
> that here.   Another question is what do you do when your are away from
> the house.  Cameras won't stop criminals but they can be helpful in
> getting convictions if the person committing the crime is rded on
> video tape.  It might also help ver your property.
> > I have tried to get a bid for this system from the folks who installed the
> > system at the local exercise club, without success.  The club's system has
> > more cameras, but only 1 monitor site.
> The installation of a video system is no more complex than running
> wiring for a cable TV system.  If you are building your house it will be
> cheapest if the cabling is done while the walls are open.  You do need
> to watch cable lengths, don't bridge the coax,
> provide proper terminations. etc.
> > Our local library books on such systems are out of date and minimal.
> Try the following web site:
> http://www.supercircuits.com
> The prices are what you should expect to pay.  You might find individual
> items a few bucks cheaper elsewhere but I consider these to be good
> prices.  Get their catalog. It shows basic hookups.
> > When I have talked with supposedly knowledgable people at security businesses
> > businesses and asked for information, the replies have always been, "Oh, we'll
> > send xxx (joe, Bill, etc.) out to do an estimate.  But Joe, Bill, etc. never
> > phone back to set up an appointment to look at our plans.
> Maybe your town just doesn't have anyone suitable or you haven't called
> the right
> people.  Installing video systems isn't as common as alarm systems.
> Some companies do both.  It's not rocket science but it is labor to
> drill the holes, run the cables, and attach the connectors & power
> supplies.  You will have to pay for that if you don't do it yourself.
> > And, when I've asked about cost, and whether or not I can save money by
> > installing coax, etc. and/or other cabling throughout the walls as they are
> > built for bideo, as we have planned with respedct to TV antenna, FM signall,
> > Phone, computer, Hi Fi, and whatever wiring, I get no useable information
> > delineating what is feasible, cost-effective, and not.  And I get cost
> > guestimates anywhere from less than $1,000 to greater than $10,000 for the
> > whole setup.
> You may get what you pay for or you may get less.  A simple 4 to 6
> camera system with a
> scanner and two B&W monitors should be under $1000 if you wire it
> yourself.  If you start adding UHF remotes to show what's happening in
> the barn or get into image intensifiers to see in the dark with pan &
> tilt heads the $10k may not be enough.
> > My only previous attempts on the internet have located an intriguing
> > possibility:  The same sort of mini cameras that are regularly mounted on ski
> > tips of racers, helmets of auto racers and aerobatic fliers, maybe even
> > hockey pucks, for all I know, are being sold for around a hundred pounds
> > apiece, in England, along with controllers for up to 4 cameras for a couple
> > hundred pounds. Gee, if these are the same sensitive, rugged kind of tiny
> > cameras as are on skis, etc., they should work fine for home security, be
> > cheap to discard instead of repair, and give a wide angle, contrasty, ambient
> > light OK, and easy to keep relatively unknoticeable.  (They have tiny holes
> > for their lenses,  can be mounted in lamp stems, grates, etc. etc.  )
> The tiny board level cameras give impressive performance and can be
> found for under
> $50 each.  Give thought to how to mount them, power them, and run the
> video cables.
> That's the hard part.  You probably don't need the ultra invisible
> pinhole cameras. They need a little more light to provide a good image.
> > Where/how can I get real information as to what is needed for my situation,,
> > and what are the tradeoffs?
> Read the ads from companies which sell security video equipment.  Think
> about what
> they say each item will do.  Don't assume it will do things which aren't
> stated.  Talk to the sales rep's if you have questions on specific
> capabilities.
> > Is there an up-to-date book that I should read?
> Probably but I've never seen one.
> > Is there a trade or consumer magazine I should read?
> Not that I know of but I haven't searched.  I'm an end user with a video
> security system which guards my remote observatory.  It works over a UHF
> radio link.  It has
> infrared night vision capability.  I get to see occasional deer and
> other critters. I installed it after an attemepted breakin.  No human
> intruders since I put it in.
> > What are the trustworthy companies that deal in these mini setups, assuming
> > they are reliable, cheaper, easier to install and use than the normal
> > industrial camera security systems that I see all over, as I suspect is the
> > case?
> I've had good luck with supercircuits.
> There are some home automation companies with similar equipment at
> similar prices.
> They are a good place to get PIR detectors.
> > How do I get their attention and avoid getting sold a "Cadillac" when my need
> > is for a "Jeep"?
> The same way you buy a Jeep instead of a Cadillac.  Get the
> manufacturers brochures,
> compare features and price.  Ask question (most have 1-800 numbers).
> Think a lot about what you actually want to accomplish and how you will
> use it.  You apparently already know the building blocks.
> > Any help you folkds can give will be most appated.
> >   Kenora
> I tried
> Lou Boyd
> FCSA-NRA-JPFO


Gerry Schneider   Jan 26 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism Gerry Schneider <not_h...@sympatico.ca> - 1999/01/26 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalisme305844f2bf31f3e" Individual Message Show original ken...@jps.net wrote:
> > You probably should get some help from a techie news group.
> Thanks much -- Which news groups do you suggest?

Best would be sci.electronics.design, sci.electronics.components,
sci.optics and comp.robotics.misc
--
- -Gerry
          @         Change "not_here" to "lsb"
      ##_/_\__[(
       <0_0_0>      The Hi-Tech Homestead http://www3.sympatico.ca/lsb


kenora   Jan 27 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism ken...@jps.net - 1999/01/27 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalismefe4933ccde769f4" Individual Message Show original <36AC3CBD.4...@sympatico.ca>,
- -  not_h...@sympatico.ca wrote:
> You probably should get some help from a techie news group. Small CCD
> board Thanks much -- Which news groups do you suggest?
kenora
> > Am a beginner with some Heathkit level experience.
> > We are about to build a custom house on one floor.  We have designed 5 camera
> > sites into the plans.  Object is to be able to observe: A) front door
> > callers; B) other sides of the house and swimming pool; C) in sequence and,
> > on switch command, stay on designated camera until we are satisfied with what
> > we see, then go back to the sequential viewing. D) Monitors with camera
> > switching capabilities at four locations-- # 1 inside the front door in
> > entrance hall, # 2 in the kitchen/breakfast room, # 3 in Study, # 4 in Main
> > Bedroom. E) Images may be black and white (B&W), not color, if B&W will:  (1)
> > substantially reduce cost of system;  (2) ensure better image capability in
> > low ambient outdoor light  (not starlight -- not that sort of stuff, but
> > capable of showing good contrast images in shadow areas during daylight and
> > when outside lights are on at night,  as I see in use in a local health club
> > -- their system , which appears to use standard industrial cameras, does a
> > fine job, even as evening comes on and before outside lights come on.) F)
> > Include 2-way intercom so front and back door visitors can identify selves
> > and talk with us.
> > G) Use wide-angle lenses and thereby avoid the complexity and cost of motor
> > driven, side-to-side scanning mounts for the cameras( which must be capable of
> > coming to a stop to continue looking at one camera view -- or doe the majority
> > of installations use some sort of screen "freeze" circuitry, to avoid the
> > complexity of motor control circuitry?)
> > I have tried to get a bid for this system from the folks who installed the
> > system at the local exercise club, without success.  The club's system has
> > more cameras, but only 1 monitor site.
> > Our local library books on such systems are out of date and minimal.
> > When I have talked with supposedly knowledgable people at security businesses
> > businesses and asked for information, the replies have always been, "Oh, we'll
> > send xxx (joe, Bill, etc.) out to do an estimate.  But Joe, Bill, etc. never
> > phone back to set up an appointment to look at our plans.
> > And, when I've asked about cost, and whether or not I can save money by
> > installing coax, etc. and/or other cabling throughout the walls as they are
> > built for bideo, as we have planned with respedct to TV antenna, FM signall,
> > Phone, computer, Hi Fi, and whatever wiring, I get no useable information
> > delineating what is feasible, cost-effective, and not.  And I get cost
> > guestimates anywhere from less than $1,000 to greater than $10,000 for the
> > whole setup.
> > My only previous attempts on the internet have located an intriguing
> > possibility:  The same sort of mini cameras that are regularly mounted on ski
> > tips of racers, helmets of auto racers and aerobatic fliers, maybe even
> > hockey pucks, for all I know, are being sold for around a hundred pounds
> > apiece, in England, along with controllers for up to 4 cameras for a couple
> > hundred pounds. Gee, if these are the same sensitive, rugged kind of tiny
> > cameras as are on skis, etc., they should work fine for home security, be
> > cheap to discard instead of repair, and give a wide angle, contrasty, ambient
> > light OK, and easy to keep relatively unknoticeable.  (They have tiny holes
> > for their lenses,  can be mounted in lamp stems, grates, etc. etc.  )
> > Where/how can I get real information as to what is needed for my situation,,
> > and what are the tradeoffs?
> > Is there an up-to-date book that I should read?
> > Is there a trade or consumer magazine I should read?
> > What are the trustworthy companies that deal in these mini setups, assuming
> > they are reliable, cheaper, easier to install and use than the normal
> > industrial camera security systems that I see all over, as I suspect is the
> > case?
> > How do I get their attention and avoid getting sold a "Cadillac" when my need
> > is for a "Jeep"?
> > Any help you folkds can give will be most appated.
> >   Kenora
> > -----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
> > http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own
> --
> Gerry
>           @         Change "not_here" to "lsb"
>       ##_/_\__[(
>        <0_0_0>      The Hi-Tech Homestead http://www3.sympatico.ca/lsb

-----------== Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own    

kenora   Jan 27 1999, 12:00 am     Newsgroups: misc.survivalism ken...@jps.net - 1999/01/27 Subject: Re: Beginner seeks advice on home video security Reply to Author Forward Print misc.survivalism7adfa0d37c2608d8" Individual Message Show original Thanks to Messrs. Schneider, Boyd, and Kelley.  You have been very h elpful.
I'll continue with our plan, now that you folks have made it clear that it is
feasible.
Our plan is to use the security to monitor guests and each other when pool
(surrounded by locked fencing,and with motion detectors and/or IR beam, as
well) is in use.  also to montor who comes to the door.
We have a dog and two cats, so will not get a guard dog.  Certainly, if we
had jewelry or were wealthy, thus good kidnapping targets,a guard dog
security system would be great, assuming we would be willing to be
well-trained, ourselves.  But our general take on security, even though I am
a crack shot with pistol and rifle (Expert in basic training a thousand years
ago), is to ally ourselves with neighbors.  To that end, we are more
concearned about such things as mutual alarm setup for fire and medical
emergency.  However, your point about aiding capture of maelfactors with
video pics is interesting -- will do so. Kenora
We appate your suggestions, knowing they come from great experience.
-----------==
- -Posted via Deja News, The Discussion Network ==----------
http://www.dejanews.com/       Search, Read, Discuss, or Start Your Own
 

  • Security camera management software
  • Forget Camera Phones, Now iPods Are A Security Risk
  • X10 wireless cameras and video source question
  • Protective Coloration, "SECURITY" jackets, and Fake ...
  • New home automation & security equipment for sale at used prices
  • Recording home security camera directly to CD-Rom
  • Wireless home security cameras
  • SECURITY CAMERA WAR DRIVING
  • home security camera system?
  • Setting up a security camera with retired Macs
  • Techdirt Wireless
  • Buy Security Camera